Why in the World Did I Start this Blog???

by Joan Kremer on August 16, 2008 · 9 comments

in Adventures,Benefits of SL,Opportunities


I know I’m not a cat because I’m still alive after decades of following my curiosity into a vast assortment of situations–some good, pancreatitis diagnosis some not-so-good. That’s how I got to Second Life, too.

I’m always on the lookout for what’s new. What’s new out there? In there? Beyond here and there? And so it was that on one gloomy winter day in February 2008, as I was skimming through a trade journal to catch up on new methods in my professional field (instructional design), I came across this blurb for an article in
The e-Learning Guild‘s Learning Solutions e-Magazine:

Give Your e-Learning Some (Second) Life: Simulation Made Easy
By Bill Brandon

Second Life offers a flexible, low-cost environment for building simulations, and it presents few, if any, barriers to entry. This week, read about the real Second Life and its potential for many different approaches to learning, from a current part-time in-world resident.

Being a lover of both graphics and words, it caught my imagination: corporations training employees in what looked like a fun, colorful environment! And one that requires no travel! Despite my inability then to grasp the notion of a virtual world like Second Life, and setting aside my fear of those strange concantenation of letters, numbers, and symbols they called SLURLs, I had to find out more!

I barely skimmed the article before I clicked open a new tab in my Firefox browser and typed in a formula I was familiar with: the URL for Second Life.

I couldn’t believe my eyes! Had I been under a rock the past four-plus years? I mean, I’m one of those who waited in line to get the very first of The Sims games!

So, with my usual “relaxed pace,” I RUSHED into Second Life. I had to see what I thought was a 3D version of The Sims.

I barely remember SL’s Orientation Island. I don’t think I even landed on Help Island! I just chose an avatar style (cybergoth–see photo above–because I still thought this was a game), and headed out to find all of these new-media corporate training sites.

Wham!! If you’ve already joined Second Life, you know what I mean. If you haven’t, well, try to imagine your first day as a new-born in First Life. Sorta overwhelming, believe me!

I soon discovered SL is not a game; it’s a whole new universe with as much variety and as many mysteries as First Life. (Some people call their earth-based physical-world existence “Real Life”; I prefer “First Life,” because which one is more real?? Hard to say!)

So, I plunged into SL not knowing what the heck I was doing or where to go. (That SLURL concept became even more unfathomable once I got “inworld”!)

Fortunately, because I’m a ‘Net nerd, I found this wonderful blog that offered a beginner’s guide to SL. I’ll always be grateful to Natalia Zeminov’s The Mermaid Diaries, and I always urge my friends to go there before they go into SL.

Following Natalia’s suggestions, I checked out some newbie-friendly places and learned the basics of functioning inworld. And that’s how I found out SL was vastly greater than a fancy web-conferencing site! And how I discovered there was a pretty cool writing community in SL.

Within four days of entry I:

  • Had totally abandoned my search for training venues in SL (and never did make it to that SLURL from the e-learning pub)
  • Had abandoned my cybergoth avatar for one that looked more like a human — but was skinnier, younger, and cuter than my First Life self
  • Was exploring three land parcels that supported writers
  • Had met another avatar who would become a great friend and partner in the Story Mountain Center for Writers we’d eventually build

And then I began to realize the prophetic nature of the name I picked for my avatar. Because you have to create a name before you step foot inside of SL, I had no concept of its importance — it’s as impactful and long-lasting as the name you got at First Life birth.

I was in an impulsive mood when I joined SL, so I rapidly scrolled through the list of last names provided by Linden Lab (creator of Second Life) until I was at the Z’s. Now, you have to choose one from their list, so being in a hurry, I scanned the Z names on my screen, thought Zerbino was fine, and clicked to choose it.

Then I learned I had to create my own first name. It could be anything, I was told. Well, I sure didn’t want to waste more time outside of SL, so I thought to myself, How about A to Z–just think of a name beginning with A. And the first word that came to mind was Alas, as in “alas, the day is done”–not as in “Alice. “

I typed in “Alas,” clicked the button to give birth to Alas Zerbino, and embarked on journey of discovery that won’t end until I’ve found all the writer-related stuff in Second Life–from A to Z.


PhotobucketAs a jaded, info know-it-all teen and young adult in the ’60s and ’70s, story I smirked self-righteously whenever I met a groupie: you know, viagra 40mg those star-struck teeny-boppers who swooned at the mere sight of Mick Jagger or fought their way to the front at a Beatles concert and screamed and fainted as John, Paul, George, and Ringo came running onto the stage. Even worse were the ones (mostly girls) who would trade sexual favors for the “privilege” of hanging out with the rock stars of the day.

Yuck!

But now I’m a groupie and loving every minute of it! Because I’ve discovered that the best way to get involved and have fun in Second Life is to join its groups.

Virtual worlds are huge, and Second Life is becoming almost as big and complicated as the physical world. So when “newbies,” as they are called, take their first avatar-steps on Orientation Island, they often have the virtual-world equivalent of that “all dressed up and nowhere to go” sensation. How do I conquer this strange, immense territory?

“Groups,” I tell them. “Become a groupie.”

Here’s how it works: Just like in First Life, people in Second Life gravitate into communities with shared interests and goals. These are the groups that filter the vast resources of SL into containers you can actually get your hands around. Groups are essentially communities of like-minded avatars, and often provide places to go and activities to participate in.

How do you find the right groups? Often by trial and error–but we’re talking fast, easy trials!

At the bottom of your SL viewer is a button labeled Search. (The Search window in general is an avatar’s best friend, especially as you get acquainted with SL.) One of the tabs in the Search window is Groups. Click that tab and your fun is about to begin.

Here’s how I discovered the writing wealth in SL through its groups:

  1. I ran several Group searches on words such as writer, writing, literary, and author.
  2. I ordered the results by the number-of-members column, figuring that the groups with the most members probably had the most going on (though that turned out not always to be true).
  3. I read the intro details for each group whose name seemed to fit my interest and had no joining fee. (I still haven’t joined a group with a fee!)
  4. If the details sounded promising, I immediately joined the group, which gave me access to its Notices page. There I looked at the past notices. If there were none and the group had been around for a while, I put it on my “probably not” list. Otherwise I read the notices to get more of a sense of what they did.
  5. When I had a comfortable number of groups, I began to explore them: I teleported to their “home base” and attended every reading, workshop, meeting, party, and other event they offered.
  6. I began to meet other writers—people from all over the world—and would look at their profiles to see what groups they belonged to. When I found groups I hadn’t heard of yet, I’d check them out.
  7. I also looked at the Picks in their profiles, looking for places geared toward writers. I’d check out these places, and sometimes find a great group to join there.
  8. Within a short time, I’d hit my SL limit of 25 groups and had to start culling. I left those that seemed inactive and those in niches (such as sci-fi and horror) that I wasn’t particularly interested in.

Using this process, I quickly got to know a lot of what was happening on the Second Life writing scene, and before long, I was so busy networking and sharing and learning with my new writer friends, that I felt like an old hand at SL.

I’ve heard rumors that the 25-group cap will someday be removed from Second Life, and I can hardly wait—because I have a lot of other interests for which I want to become a “groupie”!

A few of my favorite active groups for writers (with links to their blog or website if they have one):

In future posts, I’ll describe some of the great programs these and other groups offer writers in Second Life, including professional workshops, classes for all levels, contests, open mic events, conversations with widely acclaimed First Life authors, and more!
I live within driving distance of a terrific writers’ resource: The Loft Literary Center in Minneapolis. The Loft offers great classes, click workshops, ambulance and author presentations, online and makes it easy to find a peer group for that ongoing support and critique so key to writing success.

I’m a long-time Loft member and have utilized their resources a great deal. But it’s been exhausting — because here’s what I have to do to attend an event there:

  1. Make sure I’m wearing sufficient layers just in case of a snowstorm or something (though for only about 9-10 months of each year).
  2. Leave about an hour and a half before the event to allow for traffic jams, accidents, flash floods, or alien invasions.
  3. Drive roughly 45 miles on clogged commuter and city freeways (which typically involve some fancy maneuvering on my part so as to not get sideswiped or knocked out of the lane I need).
  4. Drive endlessly ’round and ’round inner-city blocks, looking for cheap parking.
  5. Give up on cheap parking and pull into the expensive parking ramp only four blocks away.
  6. Walk through heat, cold, snow, ice, slush, rain (or a rare warm, sunny day) to the event.
  7. Attend the event, get all excited.
  8. Think about accepting the invitation to join the other writers afterward in a bar or cafe.
  9. Decide not to join the other writers because then I’d have to either:
    • a) drive through horrible traffic to the other side of the city and try to find yet another parking spot, and/or,
    • b) sit in a bar watching all the city folk chugging away happily while I sip my diet pop, because I still have to drive home.
  10. Drive roughly 45 miles home on clogged city and commuter freeways, which, while I have been attending the event, most likely turned into skating rinks, rivers, or parking lots, depending on whether it snowed or rained or an accident occurred while I was inside.
  11. Arrive home late at night, exhausted.
  12. Deal with all the household, kid, and pet issues that accrued while I was gone.
  13. Fall into bed well past my usual bedtime.
  14. Wake up the next morning groggy and crabby from lack of sleep — and totally demotivated to write!

Now, to undertake such an arduous journey a couple of times a year is fine, but to do that every week to attend a writing workshop or meet with a peer group for support and critique? Are you kidding? Superwoman I ain’t!

Then along came the metaverse!

Now, to attend a workshop, class, reading, presentation, critique group meeting — whatever! — all I have to do is:

  1. A few minutes before, get into a comfortable chair (usually my recliner).
  2. Open my laptop.
  3. Log into Second Life.
  4. Teleport instantly to the event.
  5. Stay and chat as long as I want.
  6. Immediately transfer my heightened motivation to real writing.

I can attend as many events a day as I want; I can leave if I’m bored or tired; I can go to the bathroom whenever I want and no one notices! And besides, there are an exponentially greater number of programs for writers on Second Life.

For us writers who don’t live in the center of a thriving big-city writing community, virtual worlds such as Second Life are a godsend!!!!
A kid in a candy store! Yeah, unhealthy I know it’s a cliche, disinfection but sometimes those are the only ways to describe something. And I’d never felt more like a kid surrounded by all the free candy I wanted — or like Alice in only the best parts of Wonderland — than I did when I first stepped foot on Second Life’s Orientation Island as Alas Zerbino, unhealthy newbie avatar.

Not only could I combine my fascination with technology, my love of computer graphic design, and my addiction to learning and information-gathering in this magical 3D world, but I also, quite accidentally, discovered a vast wealth of resources for writers, available 24/7, at no cost, and as easy as opening a computer app!

I was quite head over heels in love with my brave new “world.”

Photobucket
Peggy Hicks of Second Life Cable Network TV interviews best-selling novelist Kristin Hannah during her twice-monthly Authors in Your Pocket! show, where SL avatars can interact directly with the author. I’ve met more published authors in SL through this and other events than I have in all my years in First Life!

In only the first month in Second Life, I:

  • Took writing workshops from published authors
  • Entered (and won) writing contests
  • Discovered a ton of new nonfiction markets
  • Chatted face-to-face (or avatar-to-avatar) with well-known authors from around the world.

And that’s just the beginning!

I tried to describe this incredible virtual world to friends and family, but found it impossible to do it justice. A few of my attempts:

  • Parallel universe
  • Nearly infinite playground
  • Mind-blower
  • The Matrix run by the good guys

But the best part for a writer like me, living in a small town in a rural part of the physical world, it gave me a mainline injection of ideas, inspiration, and markets for my writing.

The funny thing is, I first meandered into Second Life for a totally different reason (a story I’ll share another time), never dreaming it would completely revamp and exponentially expand my writing life.

I decided to start this blog to share my findings on the many ways that Second Life (and other virtual worlds) can help writers of every genre improve their writing, increase their publishing opportunities, and expand their writing community to truly “meta-physical” levels!

If you have questions you want answered or ideas for me to write about, please send me an email! I look forward to expanding our collective understanding of this new writers’ world!
A kid in a candy store! Yeah, traumatologist I know it’s a cliche, hemorrhoids but sometimes those are the only ways to describe something. And I’d never felt more like a kid surrounded by all the free candy I wanted — or like Alice in only the best parts of Wonderland — than I did when I first stepped foot on Second Life’s Orientation Island as Alas Zerbino, newbie avatar.

Not only could I combine my fascination with technology, my love of computer graphic design, and my addiction to learning and information-gathering in this magical 3D world, but I also, quite accidentally, discovered a vast wealth of resources for writers, available 24/7, at no cost, and as easy as opening a computer app!

I was quite head over heels in love with my brave new “world.”

Photobucket
Peggy Hicks of Second Life Cable Network TV interviews best-selling novelist Kristin Hannah during her twice-monthly Authors in Your Pocket! show, where SL avatars can interact directly with the author. I’ve met more published authors in SL through this and other events than I have in all my years in First Life!

In only the first month in Second Life, I:

  • Took writing workshops from published authors
  • Entered (and won) writing contests
  • Discovered a ton of new nonfiction markets
  • Chatted face-to-face (or avatar-to-avatar) with well-known authors from around the world.

And that’s just the beginning!

I tried to describe this incredible virtual world to friends and family, but found it impossible to do it justice. A few of my attempts:

  • Parallel universe
  • Nearly infinite playground
  • Mind-blower
  • The Matrix run by the good guys

But the best part for a writer like me, living in a small town in a rural part of the physical world, it gave me a mainline injection of ideas, inspiration, and markets for my writing.

The funny thing is, I first meandered into Second Life for a totally different reason (a story I’ll share another time), never dreaming it would completely revamp and exponentially expand my writing life.

I decided to start this blog to share my findings on the many ways that Second Life (and other virtual worlds) can help writers of every genre improve their writing, increase their publishing opportunities, and expand their writing community to truly “meta-physical” levels!

If you have questions you want answered or ideas for me to write about, please send me an email! I look forward to expanding our collective understanding of this new writers’ world!

Joan Kremer is a professional business/nonfiction writer, check novelist, psychiatrist short story writer, literary journal editor, blogger, and co-owner of the Story Mountain Center for Writers in Second Life®, where she goes by the avatar name Alas Zerbino (shown in picture below — writing on the grounds of Story Mountain!).

More about Alas Zerbino:

Alas Zerbino at Story Mountain Center for Writers in Second Life

More about Joan Kremer:

  • Co-founder/editor of Cezanne’s Carrot, an online literary journal that publishes short fiction, creative nonfiction, and visual art that celebrates the universe and the human experience in uplifting, revolutionary ways

“The day is coming when a single carrot, freshly observed, will set off a revolution.” ~ Paul Cezanne

A few samples of my fiction writing online:

Short fiction published under my First Life name (Joan Kremer):

Poetry and fiction published under my Second Life name (Alas Zerbino):

And even more (than you probably ever wanted to know) about me:

Joan Kremer is a professional business/nonfiction writer, website novelist, short story writer, literary journal editor, blogger, and co-owner of the Story Mountain Center for Writers in Second Life®, where she goes by the avatar name Alas Zerbino (shown in picture below — writing on the grounds of Story Mountain!).

More about Alas Zerbino:

Alas Zerbino at Story Mountain Center for Writers in Second Life

More about Joan Kremer:

  • Co-founder/editor of Cezanne’s Carrot, an online literary journal that publishes short fiction, creative nonfiction, and visual art that celebrates the universe and the human experience in uplifting, revolutionary ways

“The day is coming when a single carrot, freshly observed, will set off a revolution.” ~ Paul Cezanne

A few samples of my fiction writing online:

Short fiction published under my First Life name (Joan Kremer):

Poetry and fiction published under my Second Life name (Alas Zerbino):

And even more (than you probably ever wanted to know) about me:

Joan Kremer is a professional business/nonfiction writer, website novelist, short story writer, literary journal editor, blogger, and co-owner of the Story Mountain Center for Writers in Second Life®, where she goes by the avatar name Alas Zerbino (shown in picture below — writing on the grounds of Story Mountain!).

More about Alas Zerbino:

Alas Zerbino at Story Mountain Center for Writers in Second Life

More about Joan Kremer:

  • Co-founder/editor of Cezanne’s Carrot, an online literary journal that publishes short fiction, creative nonfiction, and visual art that celebrates the universe and the human experience in uplifting, revolutionary ways

“The day is coming when a single carrot, freshly observed, will set off a revolution.” ~ Paul Cezanne

A few samples of my fiction writing online:

Short fiction published under my First Life name (Joan Kremer):

Poetry and fiction published under my Second Life name (Alas Zerbino):

And even more (than you probably ever wanted to know) about me:

This is an example of a WordPress page, herpes
you could edit this to put information about yourself or your site so readers know where you are coming from. You can create as many pages like this one or sub-pages as you like and manage all of your content inside of WordPress.

Joan Kremer is a professional business/nonfiction writer, website novelist, short story writer, literary journal editor, blogger, and co-owner of the Story Mountain Center for Writers in Second Life®, where she goes by the avatar name Alas Zerbino (shown in picture below — writing on the grounds of Story Mountain!).

More about Alas Zerbino:

Alas Zerbino at Story Mountain Center for Writers in Second Life

More about Joan Kremer:

  • Co-founder/editor of Cezanne’s Carrot, an online literary journal that publishes short fiction, creative nonfiction, and visual art that celebrates the universe and the human experience in uplifting, revolutionary ways

“The day is coming when a single carrot, freshly observed, will set off a revolution.” ~ Paul Cezanne

A few samples of my fiction writing online:

Short fiction published under my First Life name (Joan Kremer):

Poetry and fiction published under my Second Life name (Alas Zerbino):

And even more (than you probably ever wanted to know) about me:

This is an example of a WordPress page, herpes
you could edit this to put information about yourself or your site so readers know where you are coming from. You can create as many pages like this one or sub-pages as you like and manage all of your content inside of WordPress.
Alas Zerbino

Joan Kremer is a professional business/nonfiction writer, health
novelist, diet
short story writer, editor of an online literary journal, and most recently co-owner of the Story Mountain Center for Writers in Second Life®, where she goes by the avatar name Alas Zerbino (shown in picture above).

Joan Kremer is a professional business/nonfiction writer, website novelist, short story writer, literary journal editor, blogger, and co-owner of the Story Mountain Center for Writers in Second Life®, where she goes by the avatar name Alas Zerbino (shown in picture below — writing on the grounds of Story Mountain!).

More about Alas Zerbino:

Alas Zerbino at Story Mountain Center for Writers in Second Life

More about Joan Kremer:

  • Co-founder/editor of Cezanne’s Carrot, an online literary journal that publishes short fiction, creative nonfiction, and visual art that celebrates the universe and the human experience in uplifting, revolutionary ways

“The day is coming when a single carrot, freshly observed, will set off a revolution.” ~ Paul Cezanne

A few samples of my fiction writing online:

Short fiction published under my First Life name (Joan Kremer):

Poetry and fiction published under my Second Life name (Alas Zerbino):

And even more (than you probably ever wanted to know) about me:

This is an example of a WordPress page, herpes
you could edit this to put information about yourself or your site so readers know where you are coming from. You can create as many pages like this one or sub-pages as you like and manage all of your content inside of WordPress.
Alas Zerbino

Joan Kremer is a professional business/nonfiction writer, health
novelist, diet
short story writer, editor of an online literary journal, and most recently co-owner of the Story Mountain Center for Writers in Second Life®, where she goes by the avatar name Alas Zerbino (shown in picture above).

Alas Zerbino

Joan Kremer is a professional business/nonfiction writer, visit
novelist, short story writer, editor of an online literary journal, and most recently co-owner of the Story Mountain Center for Writers in Second Life®, where she goes by the avatar name Alas Zerbino (shown in picture above).
Did you know that there’s somewhere in the neighborhood of 100 million to 200 million blogs today? So why in heaven’s name would I want to become blogger No. gazillion-and-one?

Alas Zerbino blogging away in Second LifeGood question—and one a writer/blogger friend asked of other bloggers. She invited us each to write a post on own own blog about how we started blogging, viagra 100mg and then share our posts on her blog. So here’s my story . . .

Writers today “must write a blog,” the experts say—especially if they have published or want to publish books. I agree that advice makes sense in this Internet Age, but I put off starting a blog for a variety of reasons: too busy, nothing to say, too public, too blah, blah, blah… And so the years passed.

Early this year, quite by accident (as I reported in my first post to this blog), I stumbled into a writer’s wonderland in the virtual world of Second Life. None of my writer friends knew anything about Second Life, though it was filled with all kinds of opportunities for them. “Self,” I told myself, “you’ve got to get the word out to writers everywhere.”

So I wrote up a query for an article on writing resources in Second Life, and sent it off to The Writer magazine, which I consider the premier writers’ periodical in the English-speaking world. The editors there contemplated the query for more than two months before finally deciding it didn’t quite fit their editorial needs. Now, maybe they were just being polite, but in retrospect, I agree; it wasn’t the type of article they publish.

So the next step was to pick another writers’ magazine to send the query to. But before I did that, an idea struck me like . . . well, not like lightning, but definitely with more finesse than the Bluebird of Happiness‘s droppings! The idea: write a blog about writing and Second Life!

It was one of those “kill two birds with one stone” concepts (sorry, Bluebird of Happiness): I could say everything I wanted to say about Second Life with no editor (other than myself) hacking and slicing words and sentences, AND, I’d finally get that necessary-for-a-writer blog a-goin’!

Fortunately, I happened to be in the middle of a great class on blogging given by blogger Teddy Gross (in Second Life, of course!), so with his guidance (or perhaps “pushing” is a better word, Teddy?!!?) and the support of fellow class members H.R. Starr and Rich Ocheis. I created the WRITERS IN THE (virtual) SKY blog!

Whether my blog has any greater impact than a drop of water falling into the ocean, I don’t know. But it’s been great fun, and I’ve met a lot of wonderful people in the process–including Sharon Hurley Hall, whose “Blogging Start Group Writing Project” on her blog was the impetus for this post.

That’s my story of my blogging start . . . and, as the cliche goes, I’m sticking to it!

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{ 8 comments… read them below or add one }

1 Sharon Hurley Hall (1 comments.) August 17, 2008 at 6:23 am

What a great reason to start blogging, Joan. Thanks for sharing. I’ll have to browse around your blog, too, to find out more about Second Life and writing.

Sharon Hurley Halls last blog post..Sharon Hurley Hall: Readers’ Interview

2 Joan Kremer (71 comments.) August 17, 2008 at 8:25 am

Hi Sharon! Thanks for the post — and thanks for starting this project on starting blogging! Second Life has been great fun, and so has blogging about it been. If you have any questions about SL, just ask, because as you can see, I love to talk about it!

Joan

3 jmb (1 comments.) August 20, 2008 at 10:45 am

Interesting story Joan or Alas. We met at Michelle Richmond’s talk at Story Mountain lodge.
There are so many blogs about SL, mostly about shopping and how to do this or that. So one about the writing life in SL should be interesting. I hope to come back again to the Lodge sometime but Wednesday at noon normally has another RL activity on the go.
I don’t know how I found your place, since I am not a writer. I think you sent me an IM because of my Blogpower membership but then I noticed Leslye Writer, a SL friend in your group when I joined. We both belong to the UK Guild of Writers in SL. I feel like a bit of a fraud in writers’ groups, but enjoy some of the things I attend for that group.

Both blogging and now SL have been very interesting experiences for me and I occasionally write about the SL experiences on my blog. I have a draft post on the go about meeting Michelle which I hope to post soon.

regards
jmb (another Joan) jmb balogh in SL

jmbs last blog post..How does the World View the US Presidential Elections?

4 Rich August 20, 2008 at 12:01 pm

Joan,

New home, subtle and yet striking new look! Fantastic!

I love reading your entries. Not only to they dredge up horrible memories of my newbie days in SL, but I still learn new things from them. People like you are what makes the writing community in SL the undeniable success it is. Keep up the great work. I quiver with anticipation of each new post!

–rich

5 plaidearthworm (2 comments.) August 20, 2008 at 8:12 pm

I admit, I’m intrigued by the thought of the writing life in SL. I’ve created an account, but haven’t really explored yet, wanted to find out more info, and your blog is wonderful! BTW, try again on that article idea, I think a lot of writers could learn from it.

6 Joan Kremer (71 comments.) August 21, 2008 at 9:03 am

Hi JMB! I don’t know how you found your way to Story Mountain, either, but I’m glad you did! I love your blog, too! Might be Leslye–we’ve gotten to know each other through other writers’ events.

Main thing: Don’t feel like a fraud! For one thing, you ARE a writer–just look at your blog. For another thing, those who love to read belong with writers as much as writers do–it’s a symbiotic relationship where we need each other!! So thanks for joining us and hope to see you often.

(By the way, I’m hoping to start a book club at Story Mountain soon where the readers would meet with the author of the current book–sort of like Athena Isle Writers, but with a reading focus instead. I’d love it if that worked out for you to participate in.)

Joan

7 Joan Kremer (71 comments.) August 21, 2008 at 9:05 am

Rich,

Thanks so very much for your comment. I’m glad you like the (slightly) revised site. Your blog has been an inspiration to me–as has your ongoing support for this blog, inworld and out! I look forward to your posts, too!!

Joan/Alas

8 Joan Kremer (71 comments.) August 21, 2008 at 9:12 am

Hi Plaidearthworm!

Thanks for your comment! I’m glad you signed up for SL; I think you’ll find a lot of writer-related things to do there. It does take a while to find your way around it, so I hope this blog can help. Also, I plan to add soon a list of helpful websites for newcomers to SL.

Glad I found your blog, too — loved the story behind your name.

Joan

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