Redesigned Cezanne’s Carrot Resumes Publishing

by Joan Kremer on May 16, 2010 · 0 comments

in News briefs

This blog has kept me extremely busy the past few months.

“What?” you say, cialis “then where are you hiding all the posts I don’t see??”

Well, pill
not just this blog, but several other blogs, as well as all the other riches I’ve discovered in Second Life.

I can hear you now:  “Has this woman gone completely nuts??”

Not yet. But OK, that’s enough dissembling for the moment. 😀

4-23-10_rock This blog, and all things related to Second Life, have, in fact, indirectly caused my days to be filled to the brim with all the tasks related to the novel I’m currently working on.  Which is why I haven’t taken the time to write many blog posts or do much exploring in virtual worlds.

Oxymoronic, I know.  But let me explain.

I’ve been a writer for almost as long as I’ve known how to scribble a word onto a piece of paper.  My greatest passion has always been to write fiction—short stories, novels, a little poetry.  As of February 2008, I’d written a number of stories and poems, even had some luck with publishing a few.  I was struggling through the umpteenth draft (actually, only the fifth) of what I’ve come to call my apprentice novel.  It wasn’t my first, but it was the first I’d completed and revised enough times to say I’d “crafted” a novel.

In the years before that, when work and life “permitted,” I’d go for stretches where I’d write every day; then I’d stumble through just as many periods, and perhaps longer ones, where I would only think about writing every day. Two and a half years ago, I was at one of my peaks of procrastination, and just about anything could distract me—including my work as a corporate training consultant.

It was under that guise that I decided to explore Second Life.  I’d heard this virtual world was being used as a new medium for training by corporations, and I thought I should find out how I could add it to my training toolkit.

But I’ve come to learn I generally never know what anything is really about.  And SL was definitely not about expanding my training consulting practice, I quickly discovered.

It was about expanding my creative writing.

So thanks to the people I’ve met in SL—good friends, fellow writers, distinguished authors—and to all of the incredible ways Second Life supports writing and the other arts, this virtual world has sparked an acceleration in my writing career unlike anything since I learned how to make stories out of words.

4-23-10_writers

One of Second Life's pleasures--hanging out with a group of writers every Monday

Previous posts on this blog are full of the details of how that happened, and there’s no need to repeat them.  It’s the summary that I’m looking at today, the big picture of how my writing life has blossomed in the wake of discovering the SL writing community.

  • I’ve vicariously lived through the roller-coaster experience of having a novel published, thanks to my best friend in SL and writing partner in first life, Cynthia Hand, whose debut novel Unearthly has just gone into production at HarperCollins and will be released next winter.  That experience has given me an incredible education in the publishing business.
  • On average, I’ve written at least 5 days out of every week for most of the past two years, even if it was for just a few minutes.
  • In addition to the education I’ve received from observing Cynthia’s experience, I’ve learned more about the craft and business of writing from writers in SL in the past two years than in the previous ten, I’d wager.
  • I’m about two days away from finishing the third draft of my second novel, the one I hope will be published as my debut novel.

How does that explain my claim this blog has kept me very busy lately?

  1. Second Life inspired this blog.
  2. This blog inspired me to explore in even more ways how a virtual world like SL could spur my writing.
  3. SL’s writing community and the writing friendships there inspired me to write, write, write!
  4. Thus this blog has indirectly kept me too busy writing my novel to write blog posts lately.

Is that a convolutedly-good enough excuse for you?  LOL (one of my favorite SL expressions – laughing out loud).

The one thing writers can be almost as creative about as their writing, is their rational-sounding excuses for not writing. It’s ingrained, it’s a habit; I needed one of those excuses to justify working on my novel instead of this blog!  And I’ve got my fingers crossed that it will all be worth it. (I’ll report back on the outcome!)

But I’ll bet you can come up with far more imaginative reasons than that for excusing why you haven’t done something or other.  I’d love to hear them, so please add yours in the comments section and we can LOL together!

This blog has kept me extremely busy the past few months.

“What?” you say, cialis “then where are you hiding all the posts I don’t see??”

Well, pill
not just this blog, but several other blogs, as well as all the other riches I’ve discovered in Second Life.

I can hear you now:  “Has this woman gone completely nuts??”

Not yet. But OK, that’s enough dissembling for the moment. 😀

4-23-10_rock This blog, and all things related to Second Life, have, in fact, indirectly caused my days to be filled to the brim with all the tasks related to the novel I’m currently working on.  Which is why I haven’t taken the time to write many blog posts or do much exploring in virtual worlds.

Oxymoronic, I know.  But let me explain.

I’ve been a writer for almost as long as I’ve known how to scribble a word onto a piece of paper.  My greatest passion has always been to write fiction—short stories, novels, a little poetry.  As of February 2008, I’d written a number of stories and poems, even had some luck with publishing a few.  I was struggling through the umpteenth draft (actually, only the fifth) of what I’ve come to call my apprentice novel.  It wasn’t my first, but it was the first I’d completed and revised enough times to say I’d “crafted” a novel.

In the years before that, when work and life “permitted,” I’d go for stretches where I’d write every day; then I’d stumble through just as many periods, and perhaps longer ones, where I would only think about writing every day. Two and a half years ago, I was at one of my peaks of procrastination, and just about anything could distract me—including my work as a corporate training consultant.

It was under that guise that I decided to explore Second Life.  I’d heard this virtual world was being used as a new medium for training by corporations, and I thought I should find out how I could add it to my training toolkit.

But I’ve come to learn I generally never know what anything is really about.  And SL was definitely not about expanding my training consulting practice, I quickly discovered.

It was about expanding my creative writing.

So thanks to the people I’ve met in SL—good friends, fellow writers, distinguished authors—and to all of the incredible ways Second Life supports writing and the other arts, this virtual world has sparked an acceleration in my writing career unlike anything since I learned how to make stories out of words.

4-23-10_writers

One of Second Life's pleasures--hanging out with a group of writers every Monday

Previous posts on this blog are full of the details of how that happened, and there’s no need to repeat them.  It’s the summary that I’m looking at today, the big picture of how my writing life has blossomed in the wake of discovering the SL writing community.

  • I’ve vicariously lived through the roller-coaster experience of having a novel published, thanks to my best friend in SL and writing partner in first life, Cynthia Hand, whose debut novel Unearthly has just gone into production at HarperCollins and will be released next winter.  That experience has given me an incredible education in the publishing business.
  • On average, I’ve written at least 5 days out of every week for most of the past two years, even if it was for just a few minutes.
  • In addition to the education I’ve received from observing Cynthia’s experience, I’ve learned more about the craft and business of writing from writers in SL in the past two years than in the previous ten, I’d wager.
  • I’m about two days away from finishing the third draft of my second novel, the one I hope will be published as my debut novel.

How does that explain my claim this blog has kept me very busy lately?

  1. Second Life inspired this blog.
  2. This blog inspired me to explore in even more ways how a virtual world like SL could spur my writing.
  3. SL’s writing community and the writing friendships there inspired me to write, write, write!
  4. Thus this blog has indirectly kept me too busy writing my novel to write blog posts lately.

Is that a convolutedly-good enough excuse for you?  LOL (one of my favorite SL expressions – laughing out loud).

The one thing writers can be almost as creative about as their writing, is their rational-sounding excuses for not writing. It’s ingrained, it’s a habit; I needed one of those excuses to justify working on my novel instead of this blog!  And I’ve got my fingers crossed that it will all be worth it. (I’ll report back on the outcome!)

But I’ll bet you can come up with far more imaginative reasons than that for excusing why you haven’t done something or other.  I’d love to hear them, so please add yours in the comments section and we can LOL together!

This blog has kept me extremely busy the past few months.

“What?” you say, website
“then where are you hiding all the posts I don’t see??”

Well, site
not just this blog, there but several other blogs, as well as all the other riches I’ve discovered in Second Life.

I can hear you now:  “Has this woman gone completely nuts??”

Not yet. But OK, that’s enough dissembling for the moment. 😀

4-23-10_rock This blog, and all things related to Second Life, have, in fact, indirectly caused my days to be filled to the brim with all the tasks related to the novel I’m currently working on.  Which is why I haven’t taken the time to write many blog posts or do much exploring in virtual worlds.

Oxymoronic, I know.  But let me explain.

I’ve been a writer for almost as long as I’ve known how to scribble a word onto a piece of paper.  My greatest passion has always been to write fiction—short stories, novels, a little poetry.  As of February 2008, I’d written a number of stories and poems, even had some luck with publishing a few.  I was struggling through the umpteenth draft (actually, only the fifth) of what I’ve come to call my apprentice novel.  It wasn’t my first, but it was the first I’d completed and revised enough times to say I’d “crafted” a novel.

In the years before that, when work and life “permitted,” I’d go for stretches where I’d write every day; then I’d stumble through just as many periods, and perhaps longer ones, where I would only think about writing every day. Two and a half years ago, I was at one of my peaks of procrastination, and just about anything could distract me—including my work as a corporate training consultant.

It was under that guise that I decided to explore Second Life.  I’d heard this virtual world was being used as a new medium for training by corporations, and I thought I should find out how I could add it to my training toolkit.

But I’ve come to learn I generally never know what anything is really about.  And SL was definitely not about expanding my training consulting practice, I quickly discovered.

It was about expanding my creative writing.

So thanks to the people I’ve met in SL—good friends, fellow writers, distinguished authors—and to all of the incredible ways Second Life supports writing and the other arts, this virtual world has sparked an acceleration in my writing career unlike anything since I learned how to make stories out of words.

4-23-10_writers

Previous posts on this blog are full of the details of how that happened, and there’s no need to repeat them.  It’s the summary that I’m looking at today, the big picture of how my writing life has blossomed in the wake of discovering the SL writing community.

  • I’ve vicariously lived through the roller-coaster experience of having a novel published, thanks to my best friend in SL and writing partner in first life, Cynthia Hand, whose debut novel Unearthly has just gone into production at HarperCollins and will be released next winter.  That experience has given me an incredible education in the publishing business.
  • On average, I’ve written at least 5 days out of every week for most of the past two years, even if it was for just a few minutes.
  • In addition to the education I’ve received from observing Cynthia’s experience, I’ve learned more about the craft and business of writing from writers in SL in the past two years than in the previous ten, I’d wager.
  • I’m about two days away from finishing the third draft of my second novel, the one I hope will be published as my debut novel.

How does that explain my claim this blog has kept me very busy lately?

  1. Second Life inspired this blog.
  2. This blog inspired me to explore in even more ways how a virtual world like SL could spur my writing.
  3. SL’s writing community and the writing friendships there inspired me to write, write, write!
  4. Thus this blog has indirectly kept me too busy writing my novel to write blog posts lately.

Is that a convolutedly-good enough excuse for you?  LOL (one of my favorite SL expressions – laughing out loud).

The one thing writers can be almost as creative about as their writing, is their rational-sounding excuses for not writing. It’s ingrained, it’s a habit; I needed one of those excuses to justify working on my novel instead of this blog!  And I’ve got my fingers crossed that it will all be worth it. (I’ll report back on the outcome!)

But I’ll bet you can come up with far more imaginative reasons than that for excusing why you haven’t done something or other.  I’d love to hear them, so please add yours in the comments section and we can LOL together!

This blog has kept me extremely busy the past few months.

“What?” you say, cialis “then where are you hiding all the posts I don’t see??”

Well, pill
not just this blog, but several other blogs, as well as all the other riches I’ve discovered in Second Life.

I can hear you now:  “Has this woman gone completely nuts??”

Not yet. But OK, that’s enough dissembling for the moment. 😀

4-23-10_rock This blog, and all things related to Second Life, have, in fact, indirectly caused my days to be filled to the brim with all the tasks related to the novel I’m currently working on.  Which is why I haven’t taken the time to write many blog posts or do much exploring in virtual worlds.

Oxymoronic, I know.  But let me explain.

I’ve been a writer for almost as long as I’ve known how to scribble a word onto a piece of paper.  My greatest passion has always been to write fiction—short stories, novels, a little poetry.  As of February 2008, I’d written a number of stories and poems, even had some luck with publishing a few.  I was struggling through the umpteenth draft (actually, only the fifth) of what I’ve come to call my apprentice novel.  It wasn’t my first, but it was the first I’d completed and revised enough times to say I’d “crafted” a novel.

In the years before that, when work and life “permitted,” I’d go for stretches where I’d write every day; then I’d stumble through just as many periods, and perhaps longer ones, where I would only think about writing every day. Two and a half years ago, I was at one of my peaks of procrastination, and just about anything could distract me—including my work as a corporate training consultant.

It was under that guise that I decided to explore Second Life.  I’d heard this virtual world was being used as a new medium for training by corporations, and I thought I should find out how I could add it to my training toolkit.

But I’ve come to learn I generally never know what anything is really about.  And SL was definitely not about expanding my training consulting practice, I quickly discovered.

It was about expanding my creative writing.

So thanks to the people I’ve met in SL—good friends, fellow writers, distinguished authors—and to all of the incredible ways Second Life supports writing and the other arts, this virtual world has sparked an acceleration in my writing career unlike anything since I learned how to make stories out of words.

4-23-10_writers

One of Second Life's pleasures--hanging out with a group of writers every Monday

Previous posts on this blog are full of the details of how that happened, and there’s no need to repeat them.  It’s the summary that I’m looking at today, the big picture of how my writing life has blossomed in the wake of discovering the SL writing community.

  • I’ve vicariously lived through the roller-coaster experience of having a novel published, thanks to my best friend in SL and writing partner in first life, Cynthia Hand, whose debut novel Unearthly has just gone into production at HarperCollins and will be released next winter.  That experience has given me an incredible education in the publishing business.
  • On average, I’ve written at least 5 days out of every week for most of the past two years, even if it was for just a few minutes.
  • In addition to the education I’ve received from observing Cynthia’s experience, I’ve learned more about the craft and business of writing from writers in SL in the past two years than in the previous ten, I’d wager.
  • I’m about two days away from finishing the third draft of my second novel, the one I hope will be published as my debut novel.

How does that explain my claim this blog has kept me very busy lately?

  1. Second Life inspired this blog.
  2. This blog inspired me to explore in even more ways how a virtual world like SL could spur my writing.
  3. SL’s writing community and the writing friendships there inspired me to write, write, write!
  4. Thus this blog has indirectly kept me too busy writing my novel to write blog posts lately.

Is that a convolutedly-good enough excuse for you?  LOL (one of my favorite SL expressions – laughing out loud).

The one thing writers can be almost as creative about as their writing, is their rational-sounding excuses for not writing. It’s ingrained, it’s a habit; I needed one of those excuses to justify working on my novel instead of this blog!  And I’ve got my fingers crossed that it will all be worth it. (I’ll report back on the outcome!)

But I’ll bet you can come up with far more imaginative reasons than that for excusing why you haven’t done something or other.  I’d love to hear them, so please add yours in the comments section and we can LOL together!

This blog has kept me extremely busy the past few months.

“What?” you say, website
“then where are you hiding all the posts I don’t see??”

Well, site
not just this blog, there but several other blogs, as well as all the other riches I’ve discovered in Second Life.

I can hear you now:  “Has this woman gone completely nuts??”

Not yet. But OK, that’s enough dissembling for the moment. 😀

4-23-10_rock This blog, and all things related to Second Life, have, in fact, indirectly caused my days to be filled to the brim with all the tasks related to the novel I’m currently working on.  Which is why I haven’t taken the time to write many blog posts or do much exploring in virtual worlds.

Oxymoronic, I know.  But let me explain.

I’ve been a writer for almost as long as I’ve known how to scribble a word onto a piece of paper.  My greatest passion has always been to write fiction—short stories, novels, a little poetry.  As of February 2008, I’d written a number of stories and poems, even had some luck with publishing a few.  I was struggling through the umpteenth draft (actually, only the fifth) of what I’ve come to call my apprentice novel.  It wasn’t my first, but it was the first I’d completed and revised enough times to say I’d “crafted” a novel.

In the years before that, when work and life “permitted,” I’d go for stretches where I’d write every day; then I’d stumble through just as many periods, and perhaps longer ones, where I would only think about writing every day. Two and a half years ago, I was at one of my peaks of procrastination, and just about anything could distract me—including my work as a corporate training consultant.

It was under that guise that I decided to explore Second Life.  I’d heard this virtual world was being used as a new medium for training by corporations, and I thought I should find out how I could add it to my training toolkit.

But I’ve come to learn I generally never know what anything is really about.  And SL was definitely not about expanding my training consulting practice, I quickly discovered.

It was about expanding my creative writing.

So thanks to the people I’ve met in SL—good friends, fellow writers, distinguished authors—and to all of the incredible ways Second Life supports writing and the other arts, this virtual world has sparked an acceleration in my writing career unlike anything since I learned how to make stories out of words.

4-23-10_writers

Previous posts on this blog are full of the details of how that happened, and there’s no need to repeat them.  It’s the summary that I’m looking at today, the big picture of how my writing life has blossomed in the wake of discovering the SL writing community.

  • I’ve vicariously lived through the roller-coaster experience of having a novel published, thanks to my best friend in SL and writing partner in first life, Cynthia Hand, whose debut novel Unearthly has just gone into production at HarperCollins and will be released next winter.  That experience has given me an incredible education in the publishing business.
  • On average, I’ve written at least 5 days out of every week for most of the past two years, even if it was for just a few minutes.
  • In addition to the education I’ve received from observing Cynthia’s experience, I’ve learned more about the craft and business of writing from writers in SL in the past two years than in the previous ten, I’d wager.
  • I’m about two days away from finishing the third draft of my second novel, the one I hope will be published as my debut novel.

How does that explain my claim this blog has kept me very busy lately?

  1. Second Life inspired this blog.
  2. This blog inspired me to explore in even more ways how a virtual world like SL could spur my writing.
  3. SL’s writing community and the writing friendships there inspired me to write, write, write!
  4. Thus this blog has indirectly kept me too busy writing my novel to write blog posts lately.

Is that a convolutedly-good enough excuse for you?  LOL (one of my favorite SL expressions – laughing out loud).

The one thing writers can be almost as creative about as their writing, is their rational-sounding excuses for not writing. It’s ingrained, it’s a habit; I needed one of those excuses to justify working on my novel instead of this blog!  And I’ve got my fingers crossed that it will all be worth it. (I’ll report back on the outcome!)

But I’ll bet you can come up with far more imaginative reasons than that for excusing why you haven’t done something or other.  I’d love to hear them, so please add yours in the comments section and we can LOL together!

This blog has kept me extremely busy the past few months.

“What?” you say, treatment
“then where are you hiding all the posts I don’t see??”

Well, human enhancement
not just this blog, this
but several other blogs, as well as all the other riches I’ve discovered in Second Life.

I can hear you now:  “Has this woman gone completely nuts??”

Not yet.  But OK, that’s enough dissembling for the moment. 😀

4-23-10_rock This blog, and all things related to Second Life, have, in fact, indirectly caused my days to be filled to the brim with all the tasks related to the novel I’m currently working on.  Which is why I haven’t taken the time to write many blog posts or do much exploring in virtual worlds.

Oxymoronic, I know.  But let me explain.

I’ve been a writer for almost as long as I’ve known how to scribble a word onto a piece of paper.  My greatest passion has always been to write fiction—short stories, novels, a little poetry.  As of February 2008, I’d written a number of stories and poems, even had some luck with publishing a few.  I was struggling through the umpteenth draft (actually, only the fifth) of what I’ve come to call my apprentice novel.  It wasn’t my first, but it was the first I’d completed and revised enough times to say I’d “crafted” a novel.

In the years before that, when work and life “permitted,” I’d go for stretches where I’d write every day; then I’d stumble through just as many periods, and perhaps longer ones, where I would only think about writing every day. Two and a half years ago, I was at one of my peaks of procrastination, and just about anything could distract me—including my work as a corporate training consultant. 

It was under that guise that I decided to explore Second Life.  I’d heard this virtual world was being used as a new medium for training by corporations, and I thought I should find out how I could add it to my training toolkit.

But I’ve come to learn I generally never know what anything is really about.  And SL was definitely not about expanding my training consulting practice, I quickly discovered.

It was about expanding my creative writing.

So thanks to the people I’ve met in SL—good friends, fellow writers, distinguished authors—and to all of the incredible ways Second Life supports writing and the other arts, this virtual world has sparked an acceleration in my writing career unlike anything since I learned how to make stories out of words.

4-23-10_writers

Previous posts on this blog are full of the details of how that happened, and there’s no need to repeat them.  It’s the summary that I’m looking at today, the big picture of how my writing life has blossomed in the wake of discovering the SL writing community.

  • I’ve vicariously lived through the roller-coaster experience of having a novel published, thanks to my best friend in SL and writing partner in first life, Cynthia Hand, whose debut novel Unearthly has just gone into production at HarperCollins and will be released next winter.  That experience has given me an incredible education in the publishing business.
  • On average, I’ve written at least 5 days out of every week for most of the past two years, even if it was for just a few minutes.
  • In addition to the education I’ve received from observing Cynthia’s experience, I’ve learned more about the craft and business of writing from writers in SL in the past two years than in the previous ten, I’d wager.
  • I’m about two days away from finishing the third draft of my second novel, the one I hope will be published as my debut novel.

How does that explain my claim this blog has kept me very busy lately? 

  1. Second Life inspired this blog
  2. This blog inspired me to explore in even more ways how a virtual world like SL could spur my writing
  3. SL’s writing community and the writing friendships there inspired me to write, write, write
  4. Thus this blog has indirectly kept me too busy writing my novel to write blog posts lately.

Is that a convolutedly-good enough excuse for you?  LOL (one of my favorite SL expressions – laughing out loud)

The one thing writers can be almost as creative about as their writing, is their rational-sounding excuses for not writing.  It’s ingrained, it’s a habit; I needed one of those excuses to justify working on my novel instead of this blog!  And I’ve got my fingers crossed that it will all be worth it. (I’ll report back on the outcome!)

But I’ll bet you can come up with far more imaginative reasons than that for excusing why you haven’t done something or other.  I’d love to hear them, so please add yours in the comments section and we can LOL together!

This blog has kept me extremely busy the past few months.

“What?” you say, cialis “then where are you hiding all the posts I don’t see??”

Well, pill
not just this blog, but several other blogs, as well as all the other riches I’ve discovered in Second Life.

I can hear you now:  “Has this woman gone completely nuts??”

Not yet. But OK, that’s enough dissembling for the moment. 😀

4-23-10_rock This blog, and all things related to Second Life, have, in fact, indirectly caused my days to be filled to the brim with all the tasks related to the novel I’m currently working on.  Which is why I haven’t taken the time to write many blog posts or do much exploring in virtual worlds.

Oxymoronic, I know.  But let me explain.

I’ve been a writer for almost as long as I’ve known how to scribble a word onto a piece of paper.  My greatest passion has always been to write fiction—short stories, novels, a little poetry.  As of February 2008, I’d written a number of stories and poems, even had some luck with publishing a few.  I was struggling through the umpteenth draft (actually, only the fifth) of what I’ve come to call my apprentice novel.  It wasn’t my first, but it was the first I’d completed and revised enough times to say I’d “crafted” a novel.

In the years before that, when work and life “permitted,” I’d go for stretches where I’d write every day; then I’d stumble through just as many periods, and perhaps longer ones, where I would only think about writing every day. Two and a half years ago, I was at one of my peaks of procrastination, and just about anything could distract me—including my work as a corporate training consultant.

It was under that guise that I decided to explore Second Life.  I’d heard this virtual world was being used as a new medium for training by corporations, and I thought I should find out how I could add it to my training toolkit.

But I’ve come to learn I generally never know what anything is really about.  And SL was definitely not about expanding my training consulting practice, I quickly discovered.

It was about expanding my creative writing.

So thanks to the people I’ve met in SL—good friends, fellow writers, distinguished authors—and to all of the incredible ways Second Life supports writing and the other arts, this virtual world has sparked an acceleration in my writing career unlike anything since I learned how to make stories out of words.

4-23-10_writers

One of Second Life's pleasures--hanging out with a group of writers every Monday

Previous posts on this blog are full of the details of how that happened, and there’s no need to repeat them.  It’s the summary that I’m looking at today, the big picture of how my writing life has blossomed in the wake of discovering the SL writing community.

  • I’ve vicariously lived through the roller-coaster experience of having a novel published, thanks to my best friend in SL and writing partner in first life, Cynthia Hand, whose debut novel Unearthly has just gone into production at HarperCollins and will be released next winter.  That experience has given me an incredible education in the publishing business.
  • On average, I’ve written at least 5 days out of every week for most of the past two years, even if it was for just a few minutes.
  • In addition to the education I’ve received from observing Cynthia’s experience, I’ve learned more about the craft and business of writing from writers in SL in the past two years than in the previous ten, I’d wager.
  • I’m about two days away from finishing the third draft of my second novel, the one I hope will be published as my debut novel.

How does that explain my claim this blog has kept me very busy lately?

  1. Second Life inspired this blog.
  2. This blog inspired me to explore in even more ways how a virtual world like SL could spur my writing.
  3. SL’s writing community and the writing friendships there inspired me to write, write, write!
  4. Thus this blog has indirectly kept me too busy writing my novel to write blog posts lately.

Is that a convolutedly-good enough excuse for you?  LOL (one of my favorite SL expressions – laughing out loud).

The one thing writers can be almost as creative about as their writing, is their rational-sounding excuses for not writing. It’s ingrained, it’s a habit; I needed one of those excuses to justify working on my novel instead of this blog!  And I’ve got my fingers crossed that it will all be worth it. (I’ll report back on the outcome!)

But I’ll bet you can come up with far more imaginative reasons than that for excusing why you haven’t done something or other.  I’d love to hear them, so please add yours in the comments section and we can LOL together!

This blog has kept me extremely busy the past few months.

“What?” you say, website
“then where are you hiding all the posts I don’t see??”

Well, site
not just this blog, there but several other blogs, as well as all the other riches I’ve discovered in Second Life.

I can hear you now:  “Has this woman gone completely nuts??”

Not yet. But OK, that’s enough dissembling for the moment. 😀

4-23-10_rock This blog, and all things related to Second Life, have, in fact, indirectly caused my days to be filled to the brim with all the tasks related to the novel I’m currently working on.  Which is why I haven’t taken the time to write many blog posts or do much exploring in virtual worlds.

Oxymoronic, I know.  But let me explain.

I’ve been a writer for almost as long as I’ve known how to scribble a word onto a piece of paper.  My greatest passion has always been to write fiction—short stories, novels, a little poetry.  As of February 2008, I’d written a number of stories and poems, even had some luck with publishing a few.  I was struggling through the umpteenth draft (actually, only the fifth) of what I’ve come to call my apprentice novel.  It wasn’t my first, but it was the first I’d completed and revised enough times to say I’d “crafted” a novel.

In the years before that, when work and life “permitted,” I’d go for stretches where I’d write every day; then I’d stumble through just as many periods, and perhaps longer ones, where I would only think about writing every day. Two and a half years ago, I was at one of my peaks of procrastination, and just about anything could distract me—including my work as a corporate training consultant.

It was under that guise that I decided to explore Second Life.  I’d heard this virtual world was being used as a new medium for training by corporations, and I thought I should find out how I could add it to my training toolkit.

But I’ve come to learn I generally never know what anything is really about.  And SL was definitely not about expanding my training consulting practice, I quickly discovered.

It was about expanding my creative writing.

So thanks to the people I’ve met in SL—good friends, fellow writers, distinguished authors—and to all of the incredible ways Second Life supports writing and the other arts, this virtual world has sparked an acceleration in my writing career unlike anything since I learned how to make stories out of words.

4-23-10_writers

Previous posts on this blog are full of the details of how that happened, and there’s no need to repeat them.  It’s the summary that I’m looking at today, the big picture of how my writing life has blossomed in the wake of discovering the SL writing community.

  • I’ve vicariously lived through the roller-coaster experience of having a novel published, thanks to my best friend in SL and writing partner in first life, Cynthia Hand, whose debut novel Unearthly has just gone into production at HarperCollins and will be released next winter.  That experience has given me an incredible education in the publishing business.
  • On average, I’ve written at least 5 days out of every week for most of the past two years, even if it was for just a few minutes.
  • In addition to the education I’ve received from observing Cynthia’s experience, I’ve learned more about the craft and business of writing from writers in SL in the past two years than in the previous ten, I’d wager.
  • I’m about two days away from finishing the third draft of my second novel, the one I hope will be published as my debut novel.

How does that explain my claim this blog has kept me very busy lately?

  1. Second Life inspired this blog.
  2. This blog inspired me to explore in even more ways how a virtual world like SL could spur my writing.
  3. SL’s writing community and the writing friendships there inspired me to write, write, write!
  4. Thus this blog has indirectly kept me too busy writing my novel to write blog posts lately.

Is that a convolutedly-good enough excuse for you?  LOL (one of my favorite SL expressions – laughing out loud).

The one thing writers can be almost as creative about as their writing, is their rational-sounding excuses for not writing. It’s ingrained, it’s a habit; I needed one of those excuses to justify working on my novel instead of this blog!  And I’ve got my fingers crossed that it will all be worth it. (I’ll report back on the outcome!)

But I’ll bet you can come up with far more imaginative reasons than that for excusing why you haven’t done something or other.  I’d love to hear them, so please add yours in the comments section and we can LOL together!

This blog has kept me extremely busy the past few months.

“What?” you say, treatment
“then where are you hiding all the posts I don’t see??”

Well, human enhancement
not just this blog, this
but several other blogs, as well as all the other riches I’ve discovered in Second Life.

I can hear you now:  “Has this woman gone completely nuts??”

Not yet.  But OK, that’s enough dissembling for the moment. 😀

4-23-10_rock This blog, and all things related to Second Life, have, in fact, indirectly caused my days to be filled to the brim with all the tasks related to the novel I’m currently working on.  Which is why I haven’t taken the time to write many blog posts or do much exploring in virtual worlds.

Oxymoronic, I know.  But let me explain.

I’ve been a writer for almost as long as I’ve known how to scribble a word onto a piece of paper.  My greatest passion has always been to write fiction—short stories, novels, a little poetry.  As of February 2008, I’d written a number of stories and poems, even had some luck with publishing a few.  I was struggling through the umpteenth draft (actually, only the fifth) of what I’ve come to call my apprentice novel.  It wasn’t my first, but it was the first I’d completed and revised enough times to say I’d “crafted” a novel.

In the years before that, when work and life “permitted,” I’d go for stretches where I’d write every day; then I’d stumble through just as many periods, and perhaps longer ones, where I would only think about writing every day. Two and a half years ago, I was at one of my peaks of procrastination, and just about anything could distract me—including my work as a corporate training consultant. 

It was under that guise that I decided to explore Second Life.  I’d heard this virtual world was being used as a new medium for training by corporations, and I thought I should find out how I could add it to my training toolkit.

But I’ve come to learn I generally never know what anything is really about.  And SL was definitely not about expanding my training consulting practice, I quickly discovered.

It was about expanding my creative writing.

So thanks to the people I’ve met in SL—good friends, fellow writers, distinguished authors—and to all of the incredible ways Second Life supports writing and the other arts, this virtual world has sparked an acceleration in my writing career unlike anything since I learned how to make stories out of words.

4-23-10_writers

Previous posts on this blog are full of the details of how that happened, and there’s no need to repeat them.  It’s the summary that I’m looking at today, the big picture of how my writing life has blossomed in the wake of discovering the SL writing community.

  • I’ve vicariously lived through the roller-coaster experience of having a novel published, thanks to my best friend in SL and writing partner in first life, Cynthia Hand, whose debut novel Unearthly has just gone into production at HarperCollins and will be released next winter.  That experience has given me an incredible education in the publishing business.
  • On average, I’ve written at least 5 days out of every week for most of the past two years, even if it was for just a few minutes.
  • In addition to the education I’ve received from observing Cynthia’s experience, I’ve learned more about the craft and business of writing from writers in SL in the past two years than in the previous ten, I’d wager.
  • I’m about two days away from finishing the third draft of my second novel, the one I hope will be published as my debut novel.

How does that explain my claim this blog has kept me very busy lately? 

  1. Second Life inspired this blog
  2. This blog inspired me to explore in even more ways how a virtual world like SL could spur my writing
  3. SL’s writing community and the writing friendships there inspired me to write, write, write
  4. Thus this blog has indirectly kept me too busy writing my novel to write blog posts lately.

Is that a convolutedly-good enough excuse for you?  LOL (one of my favorite SL expressions – laughing out loud)

The one thing writers can be almost as creative about as their writing, is their rational-sounding excuses for not writing.  It’s ingrained, it’s a habit; I needed one of those excuses to justify working on my novel instead of this blog!  And I’ve got my fingers crossed that it will all be worth it. (I’ll report back on the outcome!)

But I’ll bet you can come up with far more imaginative reasons than that for excusing why you haven’t done something or other.  I’d love to hear them, so please add yours in the comments section and we can LOL together!

This blog has kept me extremely busy the past few months.

“What?” you say, approved
“then where are you hiding all the posts I don’t see??”

Well, not just this blog, but several other blogs, as well as all the other riches I’ve discovered in Second Life.

I can hear you now:  “Has this woman gone completely nuts??”

Not yet. But OK, that’s enough dissembling for the moment. 😀

4-23-10_rock This blog, and all things related to Second Life, have, in fact, indirectly caused my days to be filled to the brim with all the tasks related to the novel I’m currently working on.  Which is why I haven’t taken the time to write many blog posts or do much exploring in virtual worlds.

Oxymoronic, I know.  But let me explain.

I’ve been a writer for almost as long as I’ve known how to scribble a word onto a piece of paper.  My greatest passion has always been to write fiction—short stories, novels, a little poetry.  As of February 2008, I’d written a number of stories and poems, even had some luck with publishing a few.  I was struggling through the umpteenth draft (actually, only the fifth) of what I’ve come to call my apprentice novel.  It wasn’t my first, but it was the first I’d completed and revised enough times to say I’d “crafted” a novel.

In the years before that, when work and life “permitted,” I’d go for stretches where I’d write every day; then I’d stumble through just as many periods, and perhaps longer ones, where I would only think about writing every day. Two and a half years ago, I was at one of my peaks of procrastination, and just about anything could distract me—including my work as a corporate training consultant.

It was under that guise that I decided to explore Second Life.  I’d heard this virtual world was being used as a new medium for training by corporations, and I thought I should find out how I could add it to my training toolkit.

But I’ve come to learn I generally never know what anything is really about.  And SL was definitely not about expanding my training consulting practice, I quickly discovered.

It was about expanding my creative writing.

So thanks to the people I’ve met in SL—good friends, fellow writers, distinguished authors—and to all of the incredible ways Second Life supports writing and the other arts, this virtual world has sparked an acceleration in my writing career unlike anything since I learned how to make stories out of words.

4-23-10_writers

One of my greatest joys in Second Life--hanging out with a group of writers every Monday

Previous posts on this blog are full of the details of how that happened, and there’s no need to repeat them.  It’s the summary that I’m looking at today, the big picture of how my writing life has blossomed in the wake of discovering the SL writing community.

  • I’ve vicariously lived through the roller-coaster experience of having a novel published, thanks to my best friend in SL and writing partner in first life, Cynthia Hand, whose debut novel Unearthly has just gone into production at HarperCollins and will be released next winter.  That experience has given me an incredible education in the publishing business.
  • On average, I’ve written at least 5 days out of every week for most of the past two years, even if it was for just a few minutes.
  • In addition to the education I’ve received from observing Cynthia’s experience, I’ve learned more about the craft and business of writing from writers in SL in the past two years than in the previous ten, I’d wager.
  • I’m about two days away from finishing the third draft of my second novel, the one I hope will be published as my debut novel.

How does that explain my claim this blog has kept me very busy lately?

  1. Second Life inspired this blog.
  2. This blog inspired me to explore in even more ways how a virtual world like SL could spur my writing.
  3. SL’s writing community and the writing friendships there inspired me to write, write, write!
  4. Thus this blog has indirectly kept me too busy writing my novel to write blog posts lately.

Is that a convolutedly-good enough excuse for you?  LOL (one of my favorite SL expressions – laughing out loud).

The one thing writers can be almost as creative about as their writing, is their rational-sounding excuses for not writing. It’s ingrained, it’s a habit; I needed one of those excuses to justify working on my novel instead of this blog!  And I’ve got my fingers crossed that it will all be worth it. (I’ll report back on the outcome!)

But I’ll bet you can come up with far more imaginative reasons than that for excusing why you haven’t done something or other.  I’d love to hear them, so please add yours in the comments section and we can LOL together!

This blog has kept me extremely busy the past few months.

“What?” you say, cialis “then where are you hiding all the posts I don’t see??”

Well, pill
not just this blog, but several other blogs, as well as all the other riches I’ve discovered in Second Life.

I can hear you now:  “Has this woman gone completely nuts??”

Not yet. But OK, that’s enough dissembling for the moment. 😀

4-23-10_rock This blog, and all things related to Second Life, have, in fact, indirectly caused my days to be filled to the brim with all the tasks related to the novel I’m currently working on.  Which is why I haven’t taken the time to write many blog posts or do much exploring in virtual worlds.

Oxymoronic, I know.  But let me explain.

I’ve been a writer for almost as long as I’ve known how to scribble a word onto a piece of paper.  My greatest passion has always been to write fiction—short stories, novels, a little poetry.  As of February 2008, I’d written a number of stories and poems, even had some luck with publishing a few.  I was struggling through the umpteenth draft (actually, only the fifth) of what I’ve come to call my apprentice novel.  It wasn’t my first, but it was the first I’d completed and revised enough times to say I’d “crafted” a novel.

In the years before that, when work and life “permitted,” I’d go for stretches where I’d write every day; then I’d stumble through just as many periods, and perhaps longer ones, where I would only think about writing every day. Two and a half years ago, I was at one of my peaks of procrastination, and just about anything could distract me—including my work as a corporate training consultant.

It was under that guise that I decided to explore Second Life.  I’d heard this virtual world was being used as a new medium for training by corporations, and I thought I should find out how I could add it to my training toolkit.

But I’ve come to learn I generally never know what anything is really about.  And SL was definitely not about expanding my training consulting practice, I quickly discovered.

It was about expanding my creative writing.

So thanks to the people I’ve met in SL—good friends, fellow writers, distinguished authors—and to all of the incredible ways Second Life supports writing and the other arts, this virtual world has sparked an acceleration in my writing career unlike anything since I learned how to make stories out of words.

4-23-10_writers

One of Second Life's pleasures--hanging out with a group of writers every Monday

Previous posts on this blog are full of the details of how that happened, and there’s no need to repeat them.  It’s the summary that I’m looking at today, the big picture of how my writing life has blossomed in the wake of discovering the SL writing community.

  • I’ve vicariously lived through the roller-coaster experience of having a novel published, thanks to my best friend in SL and writing partner in first life, Cynthia Hand, whose debut novel Unearthly has just gone into production at HarperCollins and will be released next winter.  That experience has given me an incredible education in the publishing business.
  • On average, I’ve written at least 5 days out of every week for most of the past two years, even if it was for just a few minutes.
  • In addition to the education I’ve received from observing Cynthia’s experience, I’ve learned more about the craft and business of writing from writers in SL in the past two years than in the previous ten, I’d wager.
  • I’m about two days away from finishing the third draft of my second novel, the one I hope will be published as my debut novel.

How does that explain my claim this blog has kept me very busy lately?

  1. Second Life inspired this blog.
  2. This blog inspired me to explore in even more ways how a virtual world like SL could spur my writing.
  3. SL’s writing community and the writing friendships there inspired me to write, write, write!
  4. Thus this blog has indirectly kept me too busy writing my novel to write blog posts lately.

Is that a convolutedly-good enough excuse for you?  LOL (one of my favorite SL expressions – laughing out loud).

The one thing writers can be almost as creative about as their writing, is their rational-sounding excuses for not writing. It’s ingrained, it’s a habit; I needed one of those excuses to justify working on my novel instead of this blog!  And I’ve got my fingers crossed that it will all be worth it. (I’ll report back on the outcome!)

But I’ll bet you can come up with far more imaginative reasons than that for excusing why you haven’t done something or other.  I’d love to hear them, so please add yours in the comments section and we can LOL together!

This blog has kept me extremely busy the past few months.

“What?” you say, website
“then where are you hiding all the posts I don’t see??”

Well, site
not just this blog, there but several other blogs, as well as all the other riches I’ve discovered in Second Life.

I can hear you now:  “Has this woman gone completely nuts??”

Not yet. But OK, that’s enough dissembling for the moment. 😀

4-23-10_rock This blog, and all things related to Second Life, have, in fact, indirectly caused my days to be filled to the brim with all the tasks related to the novel I’m currently working on.  Which is why I haven’t taken the time to write many blog posts or do much exploring in virtual worlds.

Oxymoronic, I know.  But let me explain.

I’ve been a writer for almost as long as I’ve known how to scribble a word onto a piece of paper.  My greatest passion has always been to write fiction—short stories, novels, a little poetry.  As of February 2008, I’d written a number of stories and poems, even had some luck with publishing a few.  I was struggling through the umpteenth draft (actually, only the fifth) of what I’ve come to call my apprentice novel.  It wasn’t my first, but it was the first I’d completed and revised enough times to say I’d “crafted” a novel.

In the years before that, when work and life “permitted,” I’d go for stretches where I’d write every day; then I’d stumble through just as many periods, and perhaps longer ones, where I would only think about writing every day. Two and a half years ago, I was at one of my peaks of procrastination, and just about anything could distract me—including my work as a corporate training consultant.

It was under that guise that I decided to explore Second Life.  I’d heard this virtual world was being used as a new medium for training by corporations, and I thought I should find out how I could add it to my training toolkit.

But I’ve come to learn I generally never know what anything is really about.  And SL was definitely not about expanding my training consulting practice, I quickly discovered.

It was about expanding my creative writing.

So thanks to the people I’ve met in SL—good friends, fellow writers, distinguished authors—and to all of the incredible ways Second Life supports writing and the other arts, this virtual world has sparked an acceleration in my writing career unlike anything since I learned how to make stories out of words.

4-23-10_writers

Previous posts on this blog are full of the details of how that happened, and there’s no need to repeat them.  It’s the summary that I’m looking at today, the big picture of how my writing life has blossomed in the wake of discovering the SL writing community.

  • I’ve vicariously lived through the roller-coaster experience of having a novel published, thanks to my best friend in SL and writing partner in first life, Cynthia Hand, whose debut novel Unearthly has just gone into production at HarperCollins and will be released next winter.  That experience has given me an incredible education in the publishing business.
  • On average, I’ve written at least 5 days out of every week for most of the past two years, even if it was for just a few minutes.
  • In addition to the education I’ve received from observing Cynthia’s experience, I’ve learned more about the craft and business of writing from writers in SL in the past two years than in the previous ten, I’d wager.
  • I’m about two days away from finishing the third draft of my second novel, the one I hope will be published as my debut novel.

How does that explain my claim this blog has kept me very busy lately?

  1. Second Life inspired this blog.
  2. This blog inspired me to explore in even more ways how a virtual world like SL could spur my writing.
  3. SL’s writing community and the writing friendships there inspired me to write, write, write!
  4. Thus this blog has indirectly kept me too busy writing my novel to write blog posts lately.

Is that a convolutedly-good enough excuse for you?  LOL (one of my favorite SL expressions – laughing out loud).

The one thing writers can be almost as creative about as their writing, is their rational-sounding excuses for not writing. It’s ingrained, it’s a habit; I needed one of those excuses to justify working on my novel instead of this blog!  And I’ve got my fingers crossed that it will all be worth it. (I’ll report back on the outcome!)

But I’ll bet you can come up with far more imaginative reasons than that for excusing why you haven’t done something or other.  I’d love to hear them, so please add yours in the comments section and we can LOL together!

This blog has kept me extremely busy the past few months.

“What?” you say, treatment
“then where are you hiding all the posts I don’t see??”

Well, human enhancement
not just this blog, this
but several other blogs, as well as all the other riches I’ve discovered in Second Life.

I can hear you now:  “Has this woman gone completely nuts??”

Not yet.  But OK, that’s enough dissembling for the moment. 😀

4-23-10_rock This blog, and all things related to Second Life, have, in fact, indirectly caused my days to be filled to the brim with all the tasks related to the novel I’m currently working on.  Which is why I haven’t taken the time to write many blog posts or do much exploring in virtual worlds.

Oxymoronic, I know.  But let me explain.

I’ve been a writer for almost as long as I’ve known how to scribble a word onto a piece of paper.  My greatest passion has always been to write fiction—short stories, novels, a little poetry.  As of February 2008, I’d written a number of stories and poems, even had some luck with publishing a few.  I was struggling through the umpteenth draft (actually, only the fifth) of what I’ve come to call my apprentice novel.  It wasn’t my first, but it was the first I’d completed and revised enough times to say I’d “crafted” a novel.

In the years before that, when work and life “permitted,” I’d go for stretches where I’d write every day; then I’d stumble through just as many periods, and perhaps longer ones, where I would only think about writing every day. Two and a half years ago, I was at one of my peaks of procrastination, and just about anything could distract me—including my work as a corporate training consultant. 

It was under that guise that I decided to explore Second Life.  I’d heard this virtual world was being used as a new medium for training by corporations, and I thought I should find out how I could add it to my training toolkit.

But I’ve come to learn I generally never know what anything is really about.  And SL was definitely not about expanding my training consulting practice, I quickly discovered.

It was about expanding my creative writing.

So thanks to the people I’ve met in SL—good friends, fellow writers, distinguished authors—and to all of the incredible ways Second Life supports writing and the other arts, this virtual world has sparked an acceleration in my writing career unlike anything since I learned how to make stories out of words.

4-23-10_writers

Previous posts on this blog are full of the details of how that happened, and there’s no need to repeat them.  It’s the summary that I’m looking at today, the big picture of how my writing life has blossomed in the wake of discovering the SL writing community.

  • I’ve vicariously lived through the roller-coaster experience of having a novel published, thanks to my best friend in SL and writing partner in first life, Cynthia Hand, whose debut novel Unearthly has just gone into production at HarperCollins and will be released next winter.  That experience has given me an incredible education in the publishing business.
  • On average, I’ve written at least 5 days out of every week for most of the past two years, even if it was for just a few minutes.
  • In addition to the education I’ve received from observing Cynthia’s experience, I’ve learned more about the craft and business of writing from writers in SL in the past two years than in the previous ten, I’d wager.
  • I’m about two days away from finishing the third draft of my second novel, the one I hope will be published as my debut novel.

How does that explain my claim this blog has kept me very busy lately? 

  1. Second Life inspired this blog
  2. This blog inspired me to explore in even more ways how a virtual world like SL could spur my writing
  3. SL’s writing community and the writing friendships there inspired me to write, write, write
  4. Thus this blog has indirectly kept me too busy writing my novel to write blog posts lately.

Is that a convolutedly-good enough excuse for you?  LOL (one of my favorite SL expressions – laughing out loud)

The one thing writers can be almost as creative about as their writing, is their rational-sounding excuses for not writing.  It’s ingrained, it’s a habit; I needed one of those excuses to justify working on my novel instead of this blog!  And I’ve got my fingers crossed that it will all be worth it. (I’ll report back on the outcome!)

But I’ll bet you can come up with far more imaginative reasons than that for excusing why you haven’t done something or other.  I’d love to hear them, so please add yours in the comments section and we can LOL together!

This blog has kept me extremely busy the past few months.

“What?” you say, approved
“then where are you hiding all the posts I don’t see??”

Well, not just this blog, but several other blogs, as well as all the other riches I’ve discovered in Second Life.

I can hear you now:  “Has this woman gone completely nuts??”

Not yet. But OK, that’s enough dissembling for the moment. 😀

4-23-10_rock This blog, and all things related to Second Life, have, in fact, indirectly caused my days to be filled to the brim with all the tasks related to the novel I’m currently working on.  Which is why I haven’t taken the time to write many blog posts or do much exploring in virtual worlds.

Oxymoronic, I know.  But let me explain.

I’ve been a writer for almost as long as I’ve known how to scribble a word onto a piece of paper.  My greatest passion has always been to write fiction—short stories, novels, a little poetry.  As of February 2008, I’d written a number of stories and poems, even had some luck with publishing a few.  I was struggling through the umpteenth draft (actually, only the fifth) of what I’ve come to call my apprentice novel.  It wasn’t my first, but it was the first I’d completed and revised enough times to say I’d “crafted” a novel.

In the years before that, when work and life “permitted,” I’d go for stretches where I’d write every day; then I’d stumble through just as many periods, and perhaps longer ones, where I would only think about writing every day. Two and a half years ago, I was at one of my peaks of procrastination, and just about anything could distract me—including my work as a corporate training consultant.

It was under that guise that I decided to explore Second Life.  I’d heard this virtual world was being used as a new medium for training by corporations, and I thought I should find out how I could add it to my training toolkit.

But I’ve come to learn I generally never know what anything is really about.  And SL was definitely not about expanding my training consulting practice, I quickly discovered.

It was about expanding my creative writing.

So thanks to the people I’ve met in SL—good friends, fellow writers, distinguished authors—and to all of the incredible ways Second Life supports writing and the other arts, this virtual world has sparked an acceleration in my writing career unlike anything since I learned how to make stories out of words.

4-23-10_writers

One of my greatest joys in Second Life--hanging out with a group of writers every Monday

Previous posts on this blog are full of the details of how that happened, and there’s no need to repeat them.  It’s the summary that I’m looking at today, the big picture of how my writing life has blossomed in the wake of discovering the SL writing community.

  • I’ve vicariously lived through the roller-coaster experience of having a novel published, thanks to my best friend in SL and writing partner in first life, Cynthia Hand, whose debut novel Unearthly has just gone into production at HarperCollins and will be released next winter.  That experience has given me an incredible education in the publishing business.
  • On average, I’ve written at least 5 days out of every week for most of the past two years, even if it was for just a few minutes.
  • In addition to the education I’ve received from observing Cynthia’s experience, I’ve learned more about the craft and business of writing from writers in SL in the past two years than in the previous ten, I’d wager.
  • I’m about two days away from finishing the third draft of my second novel, the one I hope will be published as my debut novel.

How does that explain my claim this blog has kept me very busy lately?

  1. Second Life inspired this blog.
  2. This blog inspired me to explore in even more ways how a virtual world like SL could spur my writing.
  3. SL’s writing community and the writing friendships there inspired me to write, write, write!
  4. Thus this blog has indirectly kept me too busy writing my novel to write blog posts lately.

Is that a convolutedly-good enough excuse for you?  LOL (one of my favorite SL expressions – laughing out loud).

The one thing writers can be almost as creative about as their writing, is their rational-sounding excuses for not writing. It’s ingrained, it’s a habit; I needed one of those excuses to justify working on my novel instead of this blog!  And I’ve got my fingers crossed that it will all be worth it. (I’ll report back on the outcome!)

But I’ll bet you can come up with far more imaginative reasons than that for excusing why you haven’t done something or other.  I’d love to hear them, so please add yours in the comments section and we can LOL together!

This blog has kept me extremely busy the past few months.

“What?” you say, remedy
“then where are you hiding all the posts I don’t see??”

Well, urologist
not just this blog, but several other blogs, as well as all the other riches I’ve discovered in Second Life.

I can hear you now:  “Has this woman gone completely nuts??”

Not yet. But OK, that’s enough dissembling for the moment. 😀

4-23-10_rock This blog, and all things related to Second Life, have, in fact, indirectly caused my days to be filled to the brim with all the tasks related to the novel I’m currently working on.  Which is why I haven’t taken the time to write many blog posts or do much exploring in virtual worlds.

Oxymoronic, I know.  But let me explain.

I’ve been a writer for almost as long as I’ve known how to scribble a word onto a piece of paper.  My greatest passion has always been to write fiction—short stories, novels, a little poetry.  As of February 2008, I’d written a number of stories and poems, even had some luck with publishing a few.  I was struggling through the umpteenth draft (actually, only the fifth) of what I’ve come to call my apprentice novel.  It wasn’t my first, but it was the first I’d completed and revised enough times to say I’d “crafted” a novel.

In the years before that, when work and life “permitted,” I’d go for stretches where I’d write every day; then I’d stumble through just as many periods, and perhaps longer ones, where I would only think about writing every day. Two and a half years ago, I was at one of my peaks of procrastination, and just about anything could distract me—including my work as a corporate training consultant.

It was under that guise that I decided to explore Second Life.  I’d heard this virtual world was being used as a new medium for training by corporations, and I thought I should find out how I could add it to my training toolkit.

But I’ve come to learn I generally never know what anything is really about.  And SL was definitely not about expanding my training consulting practice, I quickly discovered.

It was about expanding my creative writing.

So thanks to the people I’ve met in SL—good friends, fellow writers, distinguished authors—and to all of the incredible ways Second Life supports writing and the other arts, this virtual world has sparked an acceleration in my writing career unlike anything since I learned how to make stories out of words.

4-23-10_writers

One of Second Life's pleasures--hanging out with a group of writers every Monday

Previous posts on this blog are full of the details of how that happened, and there’s no need to repeat them.  It’s the summary that I’m looking at today, the big picture of how my writing life has blossomed in the wake of discovering the SL writing community.

  • I’ve vicariously lived through the roller-coaster experience of having a novel published, thanks to my best friend in SL and writing partner in first life, Cynthia Hand, whose debut novel Unearthly has just gone into production at HarperCollins and will be released next winter.  That experience has given me an incredible education in the publishing business.
  • On average, I’ve written at least 5 days out of every week for most of the past two years, even if it was for just a few minutes.
  • In addition to the education I’ve received from observing Cynthia’s experience, I’ve learned more about the craft and business of writing from writers in SL in the past two years than in the previous ten, I’d wager.
  • I’m about two days away from finishing the third draft of my second novel, the one I hope will be published as my debut novel.

How does that explain my claim this blog has kept me very busy lately?

  1. Second Life inspired this blog.
  2. This blog inspired me to explore in even more ways how a virtual world like SL could spur my writing.
  3. SL’s writing community and the writing friendships there inspired me to write, write, write!
  4. Thus this blog has indirectly kept me too busy writing my novel to write blog posts lately.

Is that a convolutedly-good enough excuse for you?  LOL (one of my favorite SL expressions – laughing out loud).

The one thing writers can be almost as creative about as their writing, is their rational-sounding excuses for not writing. It’s ingrained, it’s a habit; I needed one of those excuses to justify working on my novel instead of this blog!  And I’ve got my fingers crossed that it will all be worth it. (I’ll report back on the outcome!)

But I’ll bet you can come up with far more imaginative reasons than that for excusing why you haven’t done something or other.  I’d love to hear them, so please add yours in the comments section and we can LOL together!

This blog has kept me extremely busy the past few months.

“What?” you say, cialis “then where are you hiding all the posts I don’t see??”

Well, pill
not just this blog, but several other blogs, as well as all the other riches I’ve discovered in Second Life.

I can hear you now:  “Has this woman gone completely nuts??”

Not yet. But OK, that’s enough dissembling for the moment. 😀

4-23-10_rock This blog, and all things related to Second Life, have, in fact, indirectly caused my days to be filled to the brim with all the tasks related to the novel I’m currently working on.  Which is why I haven’t taken the time to write many blog posts or do much exploring in virtual worlds.

Oxymoronic, I know.  But let me explain.

I’ve been a writer for almost as long as I’ve known how to scribble a word onto a piece of paper.  My greatest passion has always been to write fiction—short stories, novels, a little poetry.  As of February 2008, I’d written a number of stories and poems, even had some luck with publishing a few.  I was struggling through the umpteenth draft (actually, only the fifth) of what I’ve come to call my apprentice novel.  It wasn’t my first, but it was the first I’d completed and revised enough times to say I’d “crafted” a novel.

In the years before that, when work and life “permitted,” I’d go for stretches where I’d write every day; then I’d stumble through just as many periods, and perhaps longer ones, where I would only think about writing every day. Two and a half years ago, I was at one of my peaks of procrastination, and just about anything could distract me—including my work as a corporate training consultant.

It was under that guise that I decided to explore Second Life.  I’d heard this virtual world was being used as a new medium for training by corporations, and I thought I should find out how I could add it to my training toolkit.

But I’ve come to learn I generally never know what anything is really about.  And SL was definitely not about expanding my training consulting practice, I quickly discovered.

It was about expanding my creative writing.

So thanks to the people I’ve met in SL—good friends, fellow writers, distinguished authors—and to all of the incredible ways Second Life supports writing and the other arts, this virtual world has sparked an acceleration in my writing career unlike anything since I learned how to make stories out of words.

4-23-10_writers

One of Second Life's pleasures--hanging out with a group of writers every Monday

Previous posts on this blog are full of the details of how that happened, and there’s no need to repeat them.  It’s the summary that I’m looking at today, the big picture of how my writing life has blossomed in the wake of discovering the SL writing community.

  • I’ve vicariously lived through the roller-coaster experience of having a novel published, thanks to my best friend in SL and writing partner in first life, Cynthia Hand, whose debut novel Unearthly has just gone into production at HarperCollins and will be released next winter.  That experience has given me an incredible education in the publishing business.
  • On average, I’ve written at least 5 days out of every week for most of the past two years, even if it was for just a few minutes.
  • In addition to the education I’ve received from observing Cynthia’s experience, I’ve learned more about the craft and business of writing from writers in SL in the past two years than in the previous ten, I’d wager.
  • I’m about two days away from finishing the third draft of my second novel, the one I hope will be published as my debut novel.

How does that explain my claim this blog has kept me very busy lately?

  1. Second Life inspired this blog.
  2. This blog inspired me to explore in even more ways how a virtual world like SL could spur my writing.
  3. SL’s writing community and the writing friendships there inspired me to write, write, write!
  4. Thus this blog has indirectly kept me too busy writing my novel to write blog posts lately.

Is that a convolutedly-good enough excuse for you?  LOL (one of my favorite SL expressions – laughing out loud).

The one thing writers can be almost as creative about as their writing, is their rational-sounding excuses for not writing. It’s ingrained, it’s a habit; I needed one of those excuses to justify working on my novel instead of this blog!  And I’ve got my fingers crossed that it will all be worth it. (I’ll report back on the outcome!)

But I’ll bet you can come up with far more imaginative reasons than that for excusing why you haven’t done something or other.  I’d love to hear them, so please add yours in the comments section and we can LOL together!

This blog has kept me extremely busy the past few months.

“What?” you say, website
“then where are you hiding all the posts I don’t see??”

Well, site
not just this blog, there but several other blogs, as well as all the other riches I’ve discovered in Second Life.

I can hear you now:  “Has this woman gone completely nuts??”

Not yet. But OK, that’s enough dissembling for the moment. 😀

4-23-10_rock This blog, and all things related to Second Life, have, in fact, indirectly caused my days to be filled to the brim with all the tasks related to the novel I’m currently working on.  Which is why I haven’t taken the time to write many blog posts or do much exploring in virtual worlds.

Oxymoronic, I know.  But let me explain.

I’ve been a writer for almost as long as I’ve known how to scribble a word onto a piece of paper.  My greatest passion has always been to write fiction—short stories, novels, a little poetry.  As of February 2008, I’d written a number of stories and poems, even had some luck with publishing a few.  I was struggling through the umpteenth draft (actually, only the fifth) of what I’ve come to call my apprentice novel.  It wasn’t my first, but it was the first I’d completed and revised enough times to say I’d “crafted” a novel.

In the years before that, when work and life “permitted,” I’d go for stretches where I’d write every day; then I’d stumble through just as many periods, and perhaps longer ones, where I would only think about writing every day. Two and a half years ago, I was at one of my peaks of procrastination, and just about anything could distract me—including my work as a corporate training consultant.

It was under that guise that I decided to explore Second Life.  I’d heard this virtual world was being used as a new medium for training by corporations, and I thought I should find out how I could add it to my training toolkit.

But I’ve come to learn I generally never know what anything is really about.  And SL was definitely not about expanding my training consulting practice, I quickly discovered.

It was about expanding my creative writing.

So thanks to the people I’ve met in SL—good friends, fellow writers, distinguished authors—and to all of the incredible ways Second Life supports writing and the other arts, this virtual world has sparked an acceleration in my writing career unlike anything since I learned how to make stories out of words.

4-23-10_writers

Previous posts on this blog are full of the details of how that happened, and there’s no need to repeat them.  It’s the summary that I’m looking at today, the big picture of how my writing life has blossomed in the wake of discovering the SL writing community.

  • I’ve vicariously lived through the roller-coaster experience of having a novel published, thanks to my best friend in SL and writing partner in first life, Cynthia Hand, whose debut novel Unearthly has just gone into production at HarperCollins and will be released next winter.  That experience has given me an incredible education in the publishing business.
  • On average, I’ve written at least 5 days out of every week for most of the past two years, even if it was for just a few minutes.
  • In addition to the education I’ve received from observing Cynthia’s experience, I’ve learned more about the craft and business of writing from writers in SL in the past two years than in the previous ten, I’d wager.
  • I’m about two days away from finishing the third draft of my second novel, the one I hope will be published as my debut novel.

How does that explain my claim this blog has kept me very busy lately?

  1. Second Life inspired this blog.
  2. This blog inspired me to explore in even more ways how a virtual world like SL could spur my writing.
  3. SL’s writing community and the writing friendships there inspired me to write, write, write!
  4. Thus this blog has indirectly kept me too busy writing my novel to write blog posts lately.

Is that a convolutedly-good enough excuse for you?  LOL (one of my favorite SL expressions – laughing out loud).

The one thing writers can be almost as creative about as their writing, is their rational-sounding excuses for not writing. It’s ingrained, it’s a habit; I needed one of those excuses to justify working on my novel instead of this blog!  And I’ve got my fingers crossed that it will all be worth it. (I’ll report back on the outcome!)

But I’ll bet you can come up with far more imaginative reasons than that for excusing why you haven’t done something or other.  I’d love to hear them, so please add yours in the comments section and we can LOL together!

This blog has kept me extremely busy the past few months.

“What?” you say, treatment
“then where are you hiding all the posts I don’t see??”

Well, human enhancement
not just this blog, this
but several other blogs, as well as all the other riches I’ve discovered in Second Life.

I can hear you now:  “Has this woman gone completely nuts??”

Not yet.  But OK, that’s enough dissembling for the moment. 😀

4-23-10_rock This blog, and all things related to Second Life, have, in fact, indirectly caused my days to be filled to the brim with all the tasks related to the novel I’m currently working on.  Which is why I haven’t taken the time to write many blog posts or do much exploring in virtual worlds.

Oxymoronic, I know.  But let me explain.

I’ve been a writer for almost as long as I’ve known how to scribble a word onto a piece of paper.  My greatest passion has always been to write fiction—short stories, novels, a little poetry.  As of February 2008, I’d written a number of stories and poems, even had some luck with publishing a few.  I was struggling through the umpteenth draft (actually, only the fifth) of what I’ve come to call my apprentice novel.  It wasn’t my first, but it was the first I’d completed and revised enough times to say I’d “crafted” a novel.

In the years before that, when work and life “permitted,” I’d go for stretches where I’d write every day; then I’d stumble through just as many periods, and perhaps longer ones, where I would only think about writing every day. Two and a half years ago, I was at one of my peaks of procrastination, and just about anything could distract me—including my work as a corporate training consultant. 

It was under that guise that I decided to explore Second Life.  I’d heard this virtual world was being used as a new medium for training by corporations, and I thought I should find out how I could add it to my training toolkit.

But I’ve come to learn I generally never know what anything is really about.  And SL was definitely not about expanding my training consulting practice, I quickly discovered.

It was about expanding my creative writing.

So thanks to the people I’ve met in SL—good friends, fellow writers, distinguished authors—and to all of the incredible ways Second Life supports writing and the other arts, this virtual world has sparked an acceleration in my writing career unlike anything since I learned how to make stories out of words.

4-23-10_writers

Previous posts on this blog are full of the details of how that happened, and there’s no need to repeat them.  It’s the summary that I’m looking at today, the big picture of how my writing life has blossomed in the wake of discovering the SL writing community.

  • I’ve vicariously lived through the roller-coaster experience of having a novel published, thanks to my best friend in SL and writing partner in first life, Cynthia Hand, whose debut novel Unearthly has just gone into production at HarperCollins and will be released next winter.  That experience has given me an incredible education in the publishing business.
  • On average, I’ve written at least 5 days out of every week for most of the past two years, even if it was for just a few minutes.
  • In addition to the education I’ve received from observing Cynthia’s experience, I’ve learned more about the craft and business of writing from writers in SL in the past two years than in the previous ten, I’d wager.
  • I’m about two days away from finishing the third draft of my second novel, the one I hope will be published as my debut novel.

How does that explain my claim this blog has kept me very busy lately? 

  1. Second Life inspired this blog
  2. This blog inspired me to explore in even more ways how a virtual world like SL could spur my writing
  3. SL’s writing community and the writing friendships there inspired me to write, write, write
  4. Thus this blog has indirectly kept me too busy writing my novel to write blog posts lately.

Is that a convolutedly-good enough excuse for you?  LOL (one of my favorite SL expressions – laughing out loud)

The one thing writers can be almost as creative about as their writing, is their rational-sounding excuses for not writing.  It’s ingrained, it’s a habit; I needed one of those excuses to justify working on my novel instead of this blog!  And I’ve got my fingers crossed that it will all be worth it. (I’ll report back on the outcome!)

But I’ll bet you can come up with far more imaginative reasons than that for excusing why you haven’t done something or other.  I’d love to hear them, so please add yours in the comments section and we can LOL together!

This blog has kept me extremely busy the past few months.

“What?” you say, approved
“then where are you hiding all the posts I don’t see??”

Well, not just this blog, but several other blogs, as well as all the other riches I’ve discovered in Second Life.

I can hear you now:  “Has this woman gone completely nuts??”

Not yet. But OK, that’s enough dissembling for the moment. 😀

4-23-10_rock This blog, and all things related to Second Life, have, in fact, indirectly caused my days to be filled to the brim with all the tasks related to the novel I’m currently working on.  Which is why I haven’t taken the time to write many blog posts or do much exploring in virtual worlds.

Oxymoronic, I know.  But let me explain.

I’ve been a writer for almost as long as I’ve known how to scribble a word onto a piece of paper.  My greatest passion has always been to write fiction—short stories, novels, a little poetry.  As of February 2008, I’d written a number of stories and poems, even had some luck with publishing a few.  I was struggling through the umpteenth draft (actually, only the fifth) of what I’ve come to call my apprentice novel.  It wasn’t my first, but it was the first I’d completed and revised enough times to say I’d “crafted” a novel.

In the years before that, when work and life “permitted,” I’d go for stretches where I’d write every day; then I’d stumble through just as many periods, and perhaps longer ones, where I would only think about writing every day. Two and a half years ago, I was at one of my peaks of procrastination, and just about anything could distract me—including my work as a corporate training consultant.

It was under that guise that I decided to explore Second Life.  I’d heard this virtual world was being used as a new medium for training by corporations, and I thought I should find out how I could add it to my training toolkit.

But I’ve come to learn I generally never know what anything is really about.  And SL was definitely not about expanding my training consulting practice, I quickly discovered.

It was about expanding my creative writing.

So thanks to the people I’ve met in SL—good friends, fellow writers, distinguished authors—and to all of the incredible ways Second Life supports writing and the other arts, this virtual world has sparked an acceleration in my writing career unlike anything since I learned how to make stories out of words.

4-23-10_writers

One of my greatest joys in Second Life--hanging out with a group of writers every Monday

Previous posts on this blog are full of the details of how that happened, and there’s no need to repeat them.  It’s the summary that I’m looking at today, the big picture of how my writing life has blossomed in the wake of discovering the SL writing community.

  • I’ve vicariously lived through the roller-coaster experience of having a novel published, thanks to my best friend in SL and writing partner in first life, Cynthia Hand, whose debut novel Unearthly has just gone into production at HarperCollins and will be released next winter.  That experience has given me an incredible education in the publishing business.
  • On average, I’ve written at least 5 days out of every week for most of the past two years, even if it was for just a few minutes.
  • In addition to the education I’ve received from observing Cynthia’s experience, I’ve learned more about the craft and business of writing from writers in SL in the past two years than in the previous ten, I’d wager.
  • I’m about two days away from finishing the third draft of my second novel, the one I hope will be published as my debut novel.

How does that explain my claim this blog has kept me very busy lately?

  1. Second Life inspired this blog.
  2. This blog inspired me to explore in even more ways how a virtual world like SL could spur my writing.
  3. SL’s writing community and the writing friendships there inspired me to write, write, write!
  4. Thus this blog has indirectly kept me too busy writing my novel to write blog posts lately.

Is that a convolutedly-good enough excuse for you?  LOL (one of my favorite SL expressions – laughing out loud).

The one thing writers can be almost as creative about as their writing, is their rational-sounding excuses for not writing. It’s ingrained, it’s a habit; I needed one of those excuses to justify working on my novel instead of this blog!  And I’ve got my fingers crossed that it will all be worth it. (I’ll report back on the outcome!)

But I’ll bet you can come up with far more imaginative reasons than that for excusing why you haven’t done something or other.  I’d love to hear them, so please add yours in the comments section and we can LOL together!

This blog has kept me extremely busy the past few months.

“What?” you say, remedy
“then where are you hiding all the posts I don’t see??”

Well, urologist
not just this blog, but several other blogs, as well as all the other riches I’ve discovered in Second Life.

I can hear you now:  “Has this woman gone completely nuts??”

Not yet. But OK, that’s enough dissembling for the moment. 😀

4-23-10_rock This blog, and all things related to Second Life, have, in fact, indirectly caused my days to be filled to the brim with all the tasks related to the novel I’m currently working on.  Which is why I haven’t taken the time to write many blog posts or do much exploring in virtual worlds.

Oxymoronic, I know.  But let me explain.

I’ve been a writer for almost as long as I’ve known how to scribble a word onto a piece of paper.  My greatest passion has always been to write fiction—short stories, novels, a little poetry.  As of February 2008, I’d written a number of stories and poems, even had some luck with publishing a few.  I was struggling through the umpteenth draft (actually, only the fifth) of what I’ve come to call my apprentice novel.  It wasn’t my first, but it was the first I’d completed and revised enough times to say I’d “crafted” a novel.

In the years before that, when work and life “permitted,” I’d go for stretches where I’d write every day; then I’d stumble through just as many periods, and perhaps longer ones, where I would only think about writing every day. Two and a half years ago, I was at one of my peaks of procrastination, and just about anything could distract me—including my work as a corporate training consultant.

It was under that guise that I decided to explore Second Life.  I’d heard this virtual world was being used as a new medium for training by corporations, and I thought I should find out how I could add it to my training toolkit.

But I’ve come to learn I generally never know what anything is really about.  And SL was definitely not about expanding my training consulting practice, I quickly discovered.

It was about expanding my creative writing.

So thanks to the people I’ve met in SL—good friends, fellow writers, distinguished authors—and to all of the incredible ways Second Life supports writing and the other arts, this virtual world has sparked an acceleration in my writing career unlike anything since I learned how to make stories out of words.

4-23-10_writers

One of Second Life's pleasures--hanging out with a group of writers every Monday

Previous posts on this blog are full of the details of how that happened, and there’s no need to repeat them.  It’s the summary that I’m looking at today, the big picture of how my writing life has blossomed in the wake of discovering the SL writing community.

  • I’ve vicariously lived through the roller-coaster experience of having a novel published, thanks to my best friend in SL and writing partner in first life, Cynthia Hand, whose debut novel Unearthly has just gone into production at HarperCollins and will be released next winter.  That experience has given me an incredible education in the publishing business.
  • On average, I’ve written at least 5 days out of every week for most of the past two years, even if it was for just a few minutes.
  • In addition to the education I’ve received from observing Cynthia’s experience, I’ve learned more about the craft and business of writing from writers in SL in the past two years than in the previous ten, I’d wager.
  • I’m about two days away from finishing the third draft of my second novel, the one I hope will be published as my debut novel.

How does that explain my claim this blog has kept me very busy lately?

  1. Second Life inspired this blog.
  2. This blog inspired me to explore in even more ways how a virtual world like SL could spur my writing.
  3. SL’s writing community and the writing friendships there inspired me to write, write, write!
  4. Thus this blog has indirectly kept me too busy writing my novel to write blog posts lately.

Is that a convolutedly-good enough excuse for you?  LOL (one of my favorite SL expressions – laughing out loud).

The one thing writers can be almost as creative about as their writing, is their rational-sounding excuses for not writing. It’s ingrained, it’s a habit; I needed one of those excuses to justify working on my novel instead of this blog!  And I’ve got my fingers crossed that it will all be worth it. (I’ll report back on the outcome!)

But I’ll bet you can come up with far more imaginative reasons than that for excusing why you haven’t done something or other.  I’d love to hear them, so please add yours in the comments section and we can LOL together!

This blog has kept me extremely busy the past few months.

“What?” you say, troche
“then where are you hiding all the posts I don’t see??”

Well, not just this blog, but several other blogs, as well as all the other riches I’ve discovered in Second Life.

I can hear you now:  “Has this woman gone completely nuts??”

Not yet. But OK, that’s enough dissembling for the moment. 😀

4-23-10_rock This blog, and all things related to Second Life, have, in fact, indirectly caused my days to be filled to the brim with all the tasks related to the novel I’m currently working on.  Which is why I haven’t taken the time to write many blog posts or do much exploring in virtual worlds.

Oxymoronic, I know.  But let me explain.

I’ve been a writer for almost as long as I’ve known how to scribble a word onto a piece of paper.  My greatest passion has always been to write fiction—short stories, novels, a little poetry.  As of February 2008, I’d written a number of stories and poems, even had some luck with publishing a few.  I was struggling through the umpteenth draft (actually, only the fifth) of what I’ve come to call my apprentice novel.  It wasn’t my first, but it was the first I’d completed and revised enough times to say I’d “crafted” a novel.

In the years before that, when work and life “permitted,” I’d go for stretches where I’d write every day; then I’d stumble through just as many periods, and perhaps longer ones, where I would only think about writing every day. Two and a half years ago, I was at one of my peaks of procrastination, and just about anything could distract me—including my work as a corporate training consultant.

It was under that guise that I decided to explore Second Life.  I’d heard this virtual world was being used as a new medium for training by corporations, and I thought I should find out how I could add it to my training toolkit.

But I’ve come to learn I generally never know what anything is really about.  And SL was definitely not about expanding my training consulting practice, I quickly discovered.

It was about expanding my creative writing.

So thanks to the people I’ve met in SL—good friends, fellow writers, distinguished authors—and to all of the incredible ways Second Life supports writing and the other arts, this virtual world has sparked an acceleration in my writing career unlike anything since I learned how to make stories out of words.


4-23-10_writers

One of Second Life's pleasures--hanging out with a group of writers every Monday


Previous posts on this blog are full of the details of how that happened, and there’s no need to repeat them.  It’s the summary that I’m looking at today, the big picture of how my writing life has blossomed in the wake of discovering the SL writing community.

  • I’ve vicariously lived through the roller-coaster experience of having a novel published, thanks to my best friend in SL and writing partner in first life, Cynthia Hand, whose debut novel Unearthly has just gone into production at HarperCollins and will be released next winter.  That experience has given me an incredible education in the publishing business.
  • On average, I’ve written at least 5 days out of every week for most of the past two years, even if it was for just a few minutes.
  • In addition to the education I’ve received from observing Cynthia’s experience, I’ve learned more about the craft and business of writing from writers in SL in the past two years than in the previous ten, I’d wager.
  • I’m about two days away from finishing the third draft of my second novel, the one I hope will be published as my debut novel.

How does that explain my claim this blog has kept me very busy lately?

  1. Second Life inspired this blog.
  2. This blog inspired me to explore in even more ways how a virtual world like SL could spur my writing.
  3. SL’s writing community and the writing friendships there inspired me to write, write, write!
  4. Thus this blog has indirectly kept me too busy writing my novel to write blog posts lately.

Is that a convolutedly-good enough excuse for you?  LOL (one of my favorite SL expressions – laughing out loud).

The one thing writers can be almost as creative about as their writing, is their rational-sounding excuses for not writing. It’s ingrained, it’s a habit; I needed one of those excuses to justify working on my novel instead of this blog!  And I’ve got my fingers crossed that it will all be worth it. (I’ll report back on the outcome!)

But I’ll bet you can come up with far more imaginative reasons than that for excusing why you haven’t done something or other.  I’d love to hear them, so please add yours in the comments section and we can LOL together!

This blog has kept me extremely busy the past few months.

“What?” you say, cialis “then where are you hiding all the posts I don’t see??”

Well, pill
not just this blog, but several other blogs, as well as all the other riches I’ve discovered in Second Life.

I can hear you now:  “Has this woman gone completely nuts??”

Not yet. But OK, that’s enough dissembling for the moment. 😀

4-23-10_rock This blog, and all things related to Second Life, have, in fact, indirectly caused my days to be filled to the brim with all the tasks related to the novel I’m currently working on.  Which is why I haven’t taken the time to write many blog posts or do much exploring in virtual worlds.

Oxymoronic, I know.  But let me explain.

I’ve been a writer for almost as long as I’ve known how to scribble a word onto a piece of paper.  My greatest passion has always been to write fiction—short stories, novels, a little poetry.  As of February 2008, I’d written a number of stories and poems, even had some luck with publishing a few.  I was struggling through the umpteenth draft (actually, only the fifth) of what I’ve come to call my apprentice novel.  It wasn’t my first, but it was the first I’d completed and revised enough times to say I’d “crafted” a novel.

In the years before that, when work and life “permitted,” I’d go for stretches where I’d write every day; then I’d stumble through just as many periods, and perhaps longer ones, where I would only think about writing every day. Two and a half years ago, I was at one of my peaks of procrastination, and just about anything could distract me—including my work as a corporate training consultant.

It was under that guise that I decided to explore Second Life.  I’d heard this virtual world was being used as a new medium for training by corporations, and I thought I should find out how I could add it to my training toolkit.

But I’ve come to learn I generally never know what anything is really about.  And SL was definitely not about expanding my training consulting practice, I quickly discovered.

It was about expanding my creative writing.

So thanks to the people I’ve met in SL—good friends, fellow writers, distinguished authors—and to all of the incredible ways Second Life supports writing and the other arts, this virtual world has sparked an acceleration in my writing career unlike anything since I learned how to make stories out of words.

4-23-10_writers

One of Second Life's pleasures--hanging out with a group of writers every Monday

Previous posts on this blog are full of the details of how that happened, and there’s no need to repeat them.  It’s the summary that I’m looking at today, the big picture of how my writing life has blossomed in the wake of discovering the SL writing community.

  • I’ve vicariously lived through the roller-coaster experience of having a novel published, thanks to my best friend in SL and writing partner in first life, Cynthia Hand, whose debut novel Unearthly has just gone into production at HarperCollins and will be released next winter.  That experience has given me an incredible education in the publishing business.
  • On average, I’ve written at least 5 days out of every week for most of the past two years, even if it was for just a few minutes.
  • In addition to the education I’ve received from observing Cynthia’s experience, I’ve learned more about the craft and business of writing from writers in SL in the past two years than in the previous ten, I’d wager.
  • I’m about two days away from finishing the third draft of my second novel, the one I hope will be published as my debut novel.

How does that explain my claim this blog has kept me very busy lately?

  1. Second Life inspired this blog.
  2. This blog inspired me to explore in even more ways how a virtual world like SL could spur my writing.
  3. SL’s writing community and the writing friendships there inspired me to write, write, write!
  4. Thus this blog has indirectly kept me too busy writing my novel to write blog posts lately.

Is that a convolutedly-good enough excuse for you?  LOL (one of my favorite SL expressions – laughing out loud).

The one thing writers can be almost as creative about as their writing, is their rational-sounding excuses for not writing. It’s ingrained, it’s a habit; I needed one of those excuses to justify working on my novel instead of this blog!  And I’ve got my fingers crossed that it will all be worth it. (I’ll report back on the outcome!)

But I’ll bet you can come up with far more imaginative reasons than that for excusing why you haven’t done something or other.  I’d love to hear them, so please add yours in the comments section and we can LOL together!

This blog has kept me extremely busy the past few months.

“What?” you say, website
“then where are you hiding all the posts I don’t see??”

Well, site
not just this blog, there but several other blogs, as well as all the other riches I’ve discovered in Second Life.

I can hear you now:  “Has this woman gone completely nuts??”

Not yet. But OK, that’s enough dissembling for the moment. 😀

4-23-10_rock This blog, and all things related to Second Life, have, in fact, indirectly caused my days to be filled to the brim with all the tasks related to the novel I’m currently working on.  Which is why I haven’t taken the time to write many blog posts or do much exploring in virtual worlds.

Oxymoronic, I know.  But let me explain.

I’ve been a writer for almost as long as I’ve known how to scribble a word onto a piece of paper.  My greatest passion has always been to write fiction—short stories, novels, a little poetry.  As of February 2008, I’d written a number of stories and poems, even had some luck with publishing a few.  I was struggling through the umpteenth draft (actually, only the fifth) of what I’ve come to call my apprentice novel.  It wasn’t my first, but it was the first I’d completed and revised enough times to say I’d “crafted” a novel.

In the years before that, when work and life “permitted,” I’d go for stretches where I’d write every day; then I’d stumble through just as many periods, and perhaps longer ones, where I would only think about writing every day. Two and a half years ago, I was at one of my peaks of procrastination, and just about anything could distract me—including my work as a corporate training consultant.

It was under that guise that I decided to explore Second Life.  I’d heard this virtual world was being used as a new medium for training by corporations, and I thought I should find out how I could add it to my training toolkit.

But I’ve come to learn I generally never know what anything is really about.  And SL was definitely not about expanding my training consulting practice, I quickly discovered.

It was about expanding my creative writing.

So thanks to the people I’ve met in SL—good friends, fellow writers, distinguished authors—and to all of the incredible ways Second Life supports writing and the other arts, this virtual world has sparked an acceleration in my writing career unlike anything since I learned how to make stories out of words.

4-23-10_writers

Previous posts on this blog are full of the details of how that happened, and there’s no need to repeat them.  It’s the summary that I’m looking at today, the big picture of how my writing life has blossomed in the wake of discovering the SL writing community.

  • I’ve vicariously lived through the roller-coaster experience of having a novel published, thanks to my best friend in SL and writing partner in first life, Cynthia Hand, whose debut novel Unearthly has just gone into production at HarperCollins and will be released next winter.  That experience has given me an incredible education in the publishing business.
  • On average, I’ve written at least 5 days out of every week for most of the past two years, even if it was for just a few minutes.
  • In addition to the education I’ve received from observing Cynthia’s experience, I’ve learned more about the craft and business of writing from writers in SL in the past two years than in the previous ten, I’d wager.
  • I’m about two days away from finishing the third draft of my second novel, the one I hope will be published as my debut novel.

How does that explain my claim this blog has kept me very busy lately?

  1. Second Life inspired this blog.
  2. This blog inspired me to explore in even more ways how a virtual world like SL could spur my writing.
  3. SL’s writing community and the writing friendships there inspired me to write, write, write!
  4. Thus this blog has indirectly kept me too busy writing my novel to write blog posts lately.

Is that a convolutedly-good enough excuse for you?  LOL (one of my favorite SL expressions – laughing out loud).

The one thing writers can be almost as creative about as their writing, is their rational-sounding excuses for not writing. It’s ingrained, it’s a habit; I needed one of those excuses to justify working on my novel instead of this blog!  And I’ve got my fingers crossed that it will all be worth it. (I’ll report back on the outcome!)

But I’ll bet you can come up with far more imaginative reasons than that for excusing why you haven’t done something or other.  I’d love to hear them, so please add yours in the comments section and we can LOL together!

This blog has kept me extremely busy the past few months.

“What?” you say, treatment
“then where are you hiding all the posts I don’t see??”

Well, human enhancement
not just this blog, this
but several other blogs, as well as all the other riches I’ve discovered in Second Life.

I can hear you now:  “Has this woman gone completely nuts??”

Not yet.  But OK, that’s enough dissembling for the moment. 😀

4-23-10_rock This blog, and all things related to Second Life, have, in fact, indirectly caused my days to be filled to the brim with all the tasks related to the novel I’m currently working on.  Which is why I haven’t taken the time to write many blog posts or do much exploring in virtual worlds.

Oxymoronic, I know.  But let me explain.

I’ve been a writer for almost as long as I’ve known how to scribble a word onto a piece of paper.  My greatest passion has always been to write fiction—short stories, novels, a little poetry.  As of February 2008, I’d written a number of stories and poems, even had some luck with publishing a few.  I was struggling through the umpteenth draft (actually, only the fifth) of what I’ve come to call my apprentice novel.  It wasn’t my first, but it was the first I’d completed and revised enough times to say I’d “crafted” a novel.

In the years before that, when work and life “permitted,” I’d go for stretches where I’d write every day; then I’d stumble through just as many periods, and perhaps longer ones, where I would only think about writing every day. Two and a half years ago, I was at one of my peaks of procrastination, and just about anything could distract me—including my work as a corporate training consultant. 

It was under that guise that I decided to explore Second Life.  I’d heard this virtual world was being used as a new medium for training by corporations, and I thought I should find out how I could add it to my training toolkit.

But I’ve come to learn I generally never know what anything is really about.  And SL was definitely not about expanding my training consulting practice, I quickly discovered.

It was about expanding my creative writing.

So thanks to the people I’ve met in SL—good friends, fellow writers, distinguished authors—and to all of the incredible ways Second Life supports writing and the other arts, this virtual world has sparked an acceleration in my writing career unlike anything since I learned how to make stories out of words.

4-23-10_writers

Previous posts on this blog are full of the details of how that happened, and there’s no need to repeat them.  It’s the summary that I’m looking at today, the big picture of how my writing life has blossomed in the wake of discovering the SL writing community.

  • I’ve vicariously lived through the roller-coaster experience of having a novel published, thanks to my best friend in SL and writing partner in first life, Cynthia Hand, whose debut novel Unearthly has just gone into production at HarperCollins and will be released next winter.  That experience has given me an incredible education in the publishing business.
  • On average, I’ve written at least 5 days out of every week for most of the past two years, even if it was for just a few minutes.
  • In addition to the education I’ve received from observing Cynthia’s experience, I’ve learned more about the craft and business of writing from writers in SL in the past two years than in the previous ten, I’d wager.
  • I’m about two days away from finishing the third draft of my second novel, the one I hope will be published as my debut novel.

How does that explain my claim this blog has kept me very busy lately? 

  1. Second Life inspired this blog
  2. This blog inspired me to explore in even more ways how a virtual world like SL could spur my writing
  3. SL’s writing community and the writing friendships there inspired me to write, write, write
  4. Thus this blog has indirectly kept me too busy writing my novel to write blog posts lately.

Is that a convolutedly-good enough excuse for you?  LOL (one of my favorite SL expressions – laughing out loud)

The one thing writers can be almost as creative about as their writing, is their rational-sounding excuses for not writing.  It’s ingrained, it’s a habit; I needed one of those excuses to justify working on my novel instead of this blog!  And I’ve got my fingers crossed that it will all be worth it. (I’ll report back on the outcome!)

But I’ll bet you can come up with far more imaginative reasons than that for excusing why you haven’t done something or other.  I’d love to hear them, so please add yours in the comments section and we can LOL together!

This blog has kept me extremely busy the past few months.

“What?” you say, approved
“then where are you hiding all the posts I don’t see??”

Well, not just this blog, but several other blogs, as well as all the other riches I’ve discovered in Second Life.

I can hear you now:  “Has this woman gone completely nuts??”

Not yet. But OK, that’s enough dissembling for the moment. 😀

4-23-10_rock This blog, and all things related to Second Life, have, in fact, indirectly caused my days to be filled to the brim with all the tasks related to the novel I’m currently working on.  Which is why I haven’t taken the time to write many blog posts or do much exploring in virtual worlds.

Oxymoronic, I know.  But let me explain.

I’ve been a writer for almost as long as I’ve known how to scribble a word onto a piece of paper.  My greatest passion has always been to write fiction—short stories, novels, a little poetry.  As of February 2008, I’d written a number of stories and poems, even had some luck with publishing a few.  I was struggling through the umpteenth draft (actually, only the fifth) of what I’ve come to call my apprentice novel.  It wasn’t my first, but it was the first I’d completed and revised enough times to say I’d “crafted” a novel.

In the years before that, when work and life “permitted,” I’d go for stretches where I’d write every day; then I’d stumble through just as many periods, and perhaps longer ones, where I would only think about writing every day. Two and a half years ago, I was at one of my peaks of procrastination, and just about anything could distract me—including my work as a corporate training consultant.

It was under that guise that I decided to explore Second Life.  I’d heard this virtual world was being used as a new medium for training by corporations, and I thought I should find out how I could add it to my training toolkit.

But I’ve come to learn I generally never know what anything is really about.  And SL was definitely not about expanding my training consulting practice, I quickly discovered.

It was about expanding my creative writing.

So thanks to the people I’ve met in SL—good friends, fellow writers, distinguished authors—and to all of the incredible ways Second Life supports writing and the other arts, this virtual world has sparked an acceleration in my writing career unlike anything since I learned how to make stories out of words.

4-23-10_writers

One of my greatest joys in Second Life--hanging out with a group of writers every Monday

Previous posts on this blog are full of the details of how that happened, and there’s no need to repeat them.  It’s the summary that I’m looking at today, the big picture of how my writing life has blossomed in the wake of discovering the SL writing community.

  • I’ve vicariously lived through the roller-coaster experience of having a novel published, thanks to my best friend in SL and writing partner in first life, Cynthia Hand, whose debut novel Unearthly has just gone into production at HarperCollins and will be released next winter.  That experience has given me an incredible education in the publishing business.
  • On average, I’ve written at least 5 days out of every week for most of the past two years, even if it was for just a few minutes.
  • In addition to the education I’ve received from observing Cynthia’s experience, I’ve learned more about the craft and business of writing from writers in SL in the past two years than in the previous ten, I’d wager.
  • I’m about two days away from finishing the third draft of my second novel, the one I hope will be published as my debut novel.

How does that explain my claim this blog has kept me very busy lately?

  1. Second Life inspired this blog.
  2. This blog inspired me to explore in even more ways how a virtual world like SL could spur my writing.
  3. SL’s writing community and the writing friendships there inspired me to write, write, write!
  4. Thus this blog has indirectly kept me too busy writing my novel to write blog posts lately.

Is that a convolutedly-good enough excuse for you?  LOL (one of my favorite SL expressions – laughing out loud).

The one thing writers can be almost as creative about as their writing, is their rational-sounding excuses for not writing. It’s ingrained, it’s a habit; I needed one of those excuses to justify working on my novel instead of this blog!  And I’ve got my fingers crossed that it will all be worth it. (I’ll report back on the outcome!)

But I’ll bet you can come up with far more imaginative reasons than that for excusing why you haven’t done something or other.  I’d love to hear them, so please add yours in the comments section and we can LOL together!

This blog has kept me extremely busy the past few months.

“What?” you say, remedy
“then where are you hiding all the posts I don’t see??”

Well, urologist
not just this blog, but several other blogs, as well as all the other riches I’ve discovered in Second Life.

I can hear you now:  “Has this woman gone completely nuts??”

Not yet. But OK, that’s enough dissembling for the moment. 😀

4-23-10_rock This blog, and all things related to Second Life, have, in fact, indirectly caused my days to be filled to the brim with all the tasks related to the novel I’m currently working on.  Which is why I haven’t taken the time to write many blog posts or do much exploring in virtual worlds.

Oxymoronic, I know.  But let me explain.

I’ve been a writer for almost as long as I’ve known how to scribble a word onto a piece of paper.  My greatest passion has always been to write fiction—short stories, novels, a little poetry.  As of February 2008, I’d written a number of stories and poems, even had some luck with publishing a few.  I was struggling through the umpteenth draft (actually, only the fifth) of what I’ve come to call my apprentice novel.  It wasn’t my first, but it was the first I’d completed and revised enough times to say I’d “crafted” a novel.

In the years before that, when work and life “permitted,” I’d go for stretches where I’d write every day; then I’d stumble through just as many periods, and perhaps longer ones, where I would only think about writing every day. Two and a half years ago, I was at one of my peaks of procrastination, and just about anything could distract me—including my work as a corporate training consultant.

It was under that guise that I decided to explore Second Life.  I’d heard this virtual world was being used as a new medium for training by corporations, and I thought I should find out how I could add it to my training toolkit.

But I’ve come to learn I generally never know what anything is really about.  And SL was definitely not about expanding my training consulting practice, I quickly discovered.

It was about expanding my creative writing.

So thanks to the people I’ve met in SL—good friends, fellow writers, distinguished authors—and to all of the incredible ways Second Life supports writing and the other arts, this virtual world has sparked an acceleration in my writing career unlike anything since I learned how to make stories out of words.

4-23-10_writers

One of Second Life's pleasures--hanging out with a group of writers every Monday

Previous posts on this blog are full of the details of how that happened, and there’s no need to repeat them.  It’s the summary that I’m looking at today, the big picture of how my writing life has blossomed in the wake of discovering the SL writing community.

  • I’ve vicariously lived through the roller-coaster experience of having a novel published, thanks to my best friend in SL and writing partner in first life, Cynthia Hand, whose debut novel Unearthly has just gone into production at HarperCollins and will be released next winter.  That experience has given me an incredible education in the publishing business.
  • On average, I’ve written at least 5 days out of every week for most of the past two years, even if it was for just a few minutes.
  • In addition to the education I’ve received from observing Cynthia’s experience, I’ve learned more about the craft and business of writing from writers in SL in the past two years than in the previous ten, I’d wager.
  • I’m about two days away from finishing the third draft of my second novel, the one I hope will be published as my debut novel.

How does that explain my claim this blog has kept me very busy lately?

  1. Second Life inspired this blog.
  2. This blog inspired me to explore in even more ways how a virtual world like SL could spur my writing.
  3. SL’s writing community and the writing friendships there inspired me to write, write, write!
  4. Thus this blog has indirectly kept me too busy writing my novel to write blog posts lately.

Is that a convolutedly-good enough excuse for you?  LOL (one of my favorite SL expressions – laughing out loud).

The one thing writers can be almost as creative about as their writing, is their rational-sounding excuses for not writing. It’s ingrained, it’s a habit; I needed one of those excuses to justify working on my novel instead of this blog!  And I’ve got my fingers crossed that it will all be worth it. (I’ll report back on the outcome!)

But I’ll bet you can come up with far more imaginative reasons than that for excusing why you haven’t done something or other.  I’d love to hear them, so please add yours in the comments section and we can LOL together!

This blog has kept me extremely busy the past few months.

“What?” you say, troche
“then where are you hiding all the posts I don’t see??”

Well, not just this blog, but several other blogs, as well as all the other riches I’ve discovered in Second Life.

I can hear you now:  “Has this woman gone completely nuts??”

Not yet. But OK, that’s enough dissembling for the moment. 😀

4-23-10_rock This blog, and all things related to Second Life, have, in fact, indirectly caused my days to be filled to the brim with all the tasks related to the novel I’m currently working on.  Which is why I haven’t taken the time to write many blog posts or do much exploring in virtual worlds.

Oxymoronic, I know.  But let me explain.

I’ve been a writer for almost as long as I’ve known how to scribble a word onto a piece of paper.  My greatest passion has always been to write fiction—short stories, novels, a little poetry.  As of February 2008, I’d written a number of stories and poems, even had some luck with publishing a few.  I was struggling through the umpteenth draft (actually, only the fifth) of what I’ve come to call my apprentice novel.  It wasn’t my first, but it was the first I’d completed and revised enough times to say I’d “crafted” a novel.

In the years before that, when work and life “permitted,” I’d go for stretches where I’d write every day; then I’d stumble through just as many periods, and perhaps longer ones, where I would only think about writing every day. Two and a half years ago, I was at one of my peaks of procrastination, and just about anything could distract me—including my work as a corporate training consultant.

It was under that guise that I decided to explore Second Life.  I’d heard this virtual world was being used as a new medium for training by corporations, and I thought I should find out how I could add it to my training toolkit.

But I’ve come to learn I generally never know what anything is really about.  And SL was definitely not about expanding my training consulting practice, I quickly discovered.

It was about expanding my creative writing.

So thanks to the people I’ve met in SL—good friends, fellow writers, distinguished authors—and to all of the incredible ways Second Life supports writing and the other arts, this virtual world has sparked an acceleration in my writing career unlike anything since I learned how to make stories out of words.


4-23-10_writers

One of Second Life's pleasures--hanging out with a group of writers every Monday


Previous posts on this blog are full of the details of how that happened, and there’s no need to repeat them.  It’s the summary that I’m looking at today, the big picture of how my writing life has blossomed in the wake of discovering the SL writing community.

  • I’ve vicariously lived through the roller-coaster experience of having a novel published, thanks to my best friend in SL and writing partner in first life, Cynthia Hand, whose debut novel Unearthly has just gone into production at HarperCollins and will be released next winter.  That experience has given me an incredible education in the publishing business.
  • On average, I’ve written at least 5 days out of every week for most of the past two years, even if it was for just a few minutes.
  • In addition to the education I’ve received from observing Cynthia’s experience, I’ve learned more about the craft and business of writing from writers in SL in the past two years than in the previous ten, I’d wager.
  • I’m about two days away from finishing the third draft of my second novel, the one I hope will be published as my debut novel.

How does that explain my claim this blog has kept me very busy lately?

  1. Second Life inspired this blog.
  2. This blog inspired me to explore in even more ways how a virtual world like SL could spur my writing.
  3. SL’s writing community and the writing friendships there inspired me to write, write, write!
  4. Thus this blog has indirectly kept me too busy writing my novel to write blog posts lately.

Is that a convolutedly-good enough excuse for you?  LOL (one of my favorite SL expressions – laughing out loud).

The one thing writers can be almost as creative about as their writing, is their rational-sounding excuses for not writing. It’s ingrained, it’s a habit; I needed one of those excuses to justify working on my novel instead of this blog!  And I’ve got my fingers crossed that it will all be worth it. (I’ll report back on the outcome!)

But I’ll bet you can come up with far more imaginative reasons than that for excusing why you haven’t done something or other.  I’d love to hear them, so please add yours in the comments section and we can LOL together!

Another first for a writer in Second Life: Her original play is being produced in Second Life and, tooth
at the same time, staged via streaming media into the real-world theatre she manages.

Artists of all stripes—including writers—are constantly expanding the envelope of what’s possible with their innovations in Second Life.  Now SL resident Lailu Loon, who is Z. Sharon Glantz in “real life,” a Seattle, WA-based playwright and managing director of Seattle’s Open Circle Theater, will use her upcoming production of Oxymoronic Fusion opening April 3 (check out the play’s trailer) to bridge the virtual and real-world stages.

Stage productions have become a staple in Second Life, and the number of original plays premiering in this virtual world is growing.  But as far as I know, this is the first original play to premiere in both worlds at the same time.


4-2-10_greektheater

The Greek Theater where Oxymoronic Fusion will be performed in Second Life, April 3-11, 2010


“We’re on the ground floor of a new art form that’s still evolving, which will involve both live theater and virtual worlds,” says Lailu Loon, both author and director of Oxymoronic Fusion.  “Eventually it will be mixed, so it’ll be in both worlds.”

Lailu/Sharon has produced previous plays in Second Life, including one that was also performed at the physical world Second Life Community Convention and streamed into SL.  This is her first to go the other way.


Alas Zerbino and Lailu Loon

Talking to playwright/theater director Lailu Loon (at right) on the set of Oxymoronic Fusion


Lailu/Sharon didn’t write this play for Second Life. In fact, she wrote it years ago—before the virtual world was born.  I suspect the play was waiting for the right time and venue, because even though it is about the physical world, not SL, “it’s focus is on … how belief systems shape reality,” Lailu said—something SL’ers understand quite well!  Even the title is prophetic: “an oxymoronic fusion” is a great description of what virtual world residents do every day!

Lailu calls Oxymoronic Fusion a metaphysical farce, and from what I’ve seen of the script and scene, it’ll be full of good laughs.

It’ll also be full of great examples of how playwrights, as well as cast and crew, do some things quite different in the virtual, versus the physical, world.

For example, the set is much more complex and “magical” than it could be on an “earth stage.”  It’s a cinch to have a crystal ball manifest all kinds of things and images in SL that just couldn’t happen on the physical stage.  And pets that shape-shift? Simple as pie!

But other things that are no-brainers on the physical stage require some high-level technical skills for a virtual one. Consider the simple act of sitting on, say, a couch on the set. In a physical theater, the actor would give barely a thought to that stage direction.  In the virtual theater, this involves writing or finding just the right animation script and having the actor initiating his/her avatar’s sitting animation at just the right time and place.  Using facial expressions on the virtual stage is still near-impossible, but on the other hand, real-world actors can’t instantly pop on and off a physical stage like they can a virtual one!


4-2-10_oxymoron-scene

Ada Radium (over egg) and Lailu Loon (on banana) demonstrate some of the unique features of staging a play in Second Life


SL resident Ada Radius, the primary set designer and cast member, says producing a Second Life play is much more of a team effort for the entire cast and crew.  (Ada has been involved with theater in Second Life for several years.  To read more about her and other members of the case, see the Oxymoronic Fusion blog.)

Working with both the limitations and the opportunities of the virtual stage has been exciting, Lailu says.  She points to a redwood door on one of the sets and says, “We couldn’t possibly afford to buy redwood doors” for a physical stage set.

Another huge benefit is the ability to recruit a cast and crew of professionals and experienced amateurs from around the world.  And for actors with disabilities, a virtual world production is a great outlet.

Playwriting in the Brave New Virtual World

What really intrigues me, though, is how virtual theater affects the entire playwriting process—and will cause major shifts in that process if Lailu’s predictions about the future of virtual theater are correct (and I believe they are).

Lailu tells of how she had to a lot of “on my feet” rewriting to adapt the play to the challenges and opportunities of a virtual stage.  Like delete the scenes involving eating (avatars just can’t eat), pull the focus away from facial expressions and subtle body language, and add cool special effects.

“For writers, even those writing for a different form, the collaborative process that Second Life demands will really help them look at a different way of writing, an interactive way,” she says.  “It forces people to let go of their own preconceived notions … push their limits … find a different way of showing and telling.”

On top of that, for Oxymoronic Fusion, she has to accommodate the needs of both the virtual and physical stages so the play will be meaningful to audiences.

Still, all that is nothing compared to what Lailu sees is the new theatrical art form evolving as a result of virtual worlds.

First: mixed reality plays presented on both the physical and virtual stages at the same time, involving actors in both worlds.  Her next Second Life production will be exactly that, she says.

Further down the line:  interactive theater productions (think dinner theater mysteries combined with virtual games), an art form she believes will attract not just playwrights, but game designers.

The technology for interactive theater isn’t quite there yet, she notes, but it’s evolving. “It’s not playwriting, not screenwriting, not game development, but it involves all of that.”

That should be particularly interesting for playwrights who love to both write and explore/build/create in Second Life. And even for us non-playwright-writers who might have to give this new art form a whirl!

I’d be very interested to hear what you think—does interactive theater spark any ideas?  Are you already doing it?  Please let us know in the comments!

How to Attend Oxymoronic Fusion in SL:

WHEN: 6 performances, about 2 hours long

  • Saturday, April 3, 3 p.m. SLT (Second Life Time, which is the same as Pacific time)
  • Monday, April 5, 7 p.m. SLT
  • Wednesday, April 7, 5 p.m. SLT
  • Thursday, April 8, 7 p.m. SLT
  • Friday, April 9, 7 p.m. SLT
  • Sunday, April 11, 7:30 p.m. SLT (also streaming at Open Circle Theater)

WHERE: The Greek Theater on Cookie sim in SL; SLURL for teleporting in-world: http://slurl.com/secondlife/Cookie/57/20/33
COST: It’s free (though donations are appreciated)


This blog has kept me extremely busy the past few months.

“What?” you say, cialis “then where are you hiding all the posts I don’t see??”

Well, pill
not just this blog, but several other blogs, as well as all the other riches I’ve discovered in Second Life.

I can hear you now:  “Has this woman gone completely nuts??”

Not yet. But OK, that’s enough dissembling for the moment. 😀

4-23-10_rock This blog, and all things related to Second Life, have, in fact, indirectly caused my days to be filled to the brim with all the tasks related to the novel I’m currently working on.  Which is why I haven’t taken the time to write many blog posts or do much exploring in virtual worlds.

Oxymoronic, I know.  But let me explain.

I’ve been a writer for almost as long as I’ve known how to scribble a word onto a piece of paper.  My greatest passion has always been to write fiction—short stories, novels, a little poetry.  As of February 2008, I’d written a number of stories and poems, even had some luck with publishing a few.  I was struggling through the umpteenth draft (actually, only the fifth) of what I’ve come to call my apprentice novel.  It wasn’t my first, but it was the first I’d completed and revised enough times to say I’d “crafted” a novel.

In the years before that, when work and life “permitted,” I’d go for stretches where I’d write every day; then I’d stumble through just as many periods, and perhaps longer ones, where I would only think about writing every day. Two and a half years ago, I was at one of my peaks of procrastination, and just about anything could distract me—including my work as a corporate training consultant.

It was under that guise that I decided to explore Second Life.  I’d heard this virtual world was being used as a new medium for training by corporations, and I thought I should find out how I could add it to my training toolkit.

But I’ve come to learn I generally never know what anything is really about.  And SL was definitely not about expanding my training consulting practice, I quickly discovered.

It was about expanding my creative writing.

So thanks to the people I’ve met in SL—good friends, fellow writers, distinguished authors—and to all of the incredible ways Second Life supports writing and the other arts, this virtual world has sparked an acceleration in my writing career unlike anything since I learned how to make stories out of words.

4-23-10_writers

One of Second Life's pleasures--hanging out with a group of writers every Monday

Previous posts on this blog are full of the details of how that happened, and there’s no need to repeat them.  It’s the summary that I’m looking at today, the big picture of how my writing life has blossomed in the wake of discovering the SL writing community.

  • I’ve vicariously lived through the roller-coaster experience of having a novel published, thanks to my best friend in SL and writing partner in first life, Cynthia Hand, whose debut novel Unearthly has just gone into production at HarperCollins and will be released next winter.  That experience has given me an incredible education in the publishing business.
  • On average, I’ve written at least 5 days out of every week for most of the past two years, even if it was for just a few minutes.
  • In addition to the education I’ve received from observing Cynthia’s experience, I’ve learned more about the craft and business of writing from writers in SL in the past two years than in the previous ten, I’d wager.
  • I’m about two days away from finishing the third draft of my second novel, the one I hope will be published as my debut novel.

How does that explain my claim this blog has kept me very busy lately?

  1. Second Life inspired this blog.
  2. This blog inspired me to explore in even more ways how a virtual world like SL could spur my writing.
  3. SL’s writing community and the writing friendships there inspired me to write, write, write!
  4. Thus this blog has indirectly kept me too busy writing my novel to write blog posts lately.

Is that a convolutedly-good enough excuse for you?  LOL (one of my favorite SL expressions – laughing out loud).

The one thing writers can be almost as creative about as their writing, is their rational-sounding excuses for not writing. It’s ingrained, it’s a habit; I needed one of those excuses to justify working on my novel instead of this blog!  And I’ve got my fingers crossed that it will all be worth it. (I’ll report back on the outcome!)

But I’ll bet you can come up with far more imaginative reasons than that for excusing why you haven’t done something or other.  I’d love to hear them, so please add yours in the comments section and we can LOL together!

This blog has kept me extremely busy the past few months.

“What?” you say, website
“then where are you hiding all the posts I don’t see??”

Well, site
not just this blog, there but several other blogs, as well as all the other riches I’ve discovered in Second Life.

I can hear you now:  “Has this woman gone completely nuts??”

Not yet. But OK, that’s enough dissembling for the moment. 😀

4-23-10_rock This blog, and all things related to Second Life, have, in fact, indirectly caused my days to be filled to the brim with all the tasks related to the novel I’m currently working on.  Which is why I haven’t taken the time to write many blog posts or do much exploring in virtual worlds.

Oxymoronic, I know.  But let me explain.

I’ve been a writer for almost as long as I’ve known how to scribble a word onto a piece of paper.  My greatest passion has always been to write fiction—short stories, novels, a little poetry.  As of February 2008, I’d written a number of stories and poems, even had some luck with publishing a few.  I was struggling through the umpteenth draft (actually, only the fifth) of what I’ve come to call my apprentice novel.  It wasn’t my first, but it was the first I’d completed and revised enough times to say I’d “crafted” a novel.

In the years before that, when work and life “permitted,” I’d go for stretches where I’d write every day; then I’d stumble through just as many periods, and perhaps longer ones, where I would only think about writing every day. Two and a half years ago, I was at one of my peaks of procrastination, and just about anything could distract me—including my work as a corporate training consultant.

It was under that guise that I decided to explore Second Life.  I’d heard this virtual world was being used as a new medium for training by corporations, and I thought I should find out how I could add it to my training toolkit.

But I’ve come to learn I generally never know what anything is really about.  And SL was definitely not about expanding my training consulting practice, I quickly discovered.

It was about expanding my creative writing.

So thanks to the people I’ve met in SL—good friends, fellow writers, distinguished authors—and to all of the incredible ways Second Life supports writing and the other arts, this virtual world has sparked an acceleration in my writing career unlike anything since I learned how to make stories out of words.

4-23-10_writers

Previous posts on this blog are full of the details of how that happened, and there’s no need to repeat them.  It’s the summary that I’m looking at today, the big picture of how my writing life has blossomed in the wake of discovering the SL writing community.

  • I’ve vicariously lived through the roller-coaster experience of having a novel published, thanks to my best friend in SL and writing partner in first life, Cynthia Hand, whose debut novel Unearthly has just gone into production at HarperCollins and will be released next winter.  That experience has given me an incredible education in the publishing business.
  • On average, I’ve written at least 5 days out of every week for most of the past two years, even if it was for just a few minutes.
  • In addition to the education I’ve received from observing Cynthia’s experience, I’ve learned more about the craft and business of writing from writers in SL in the past two years than in the previous ten, I’d wager.
  • I’m about two days away from finishing the third draft of my second novel, the one I hope will be published as my debut novel.

How does that explain my claim this blog has kept me very busy lately?

  1. Second Life inspired this blog.
  2. This blog inspired me to explore in even more ways how a virtual world like SL could spur my writing.
  3. SL’s writing community and the writing friendships there inspired me to write, write, write!
  4. Thus this blog has indirectly kept me too busy writing my novel to write blog posts lately.

Is that a convolutedly-good enough excuse for you?  LOL (one of my favorite SL expressions – laughing out loud).

The one thing writers can be almost as creative about as their writing, is their rational-sounding excuses for not writing. It’s ingrained, it’s a habit; I needed one of those excuses to justify working on my novel instead of this blog!  And I’ve got my fingers crossed that it will all be worth it. (I’ll report back on the outcome!)

But I’ll bet you can come up with far more imaginative reasons than that for excusing why you haven’t done something or other.  I’d love to hear them, so please add yours in the comments section and we can LOL together!

This blog has kept me extremely busy the past few months.

“What?” you say, treatment
“then where are you hiding all the posts I don’t see??”

Well, human enhancement
not just this blog, this
but several other blogs, as well as all the other riches I’ve discovered in Second Life.

I can hear you now:  “Has this woman gone completely nuts??”

Not yet.  But OK, that’s enough dissembling for the moment. 😀

4-23-10_rock This blog, and all things related to Second Life, have, in fact, indirectly caused my days to be filled to the brim with all the tasks related to the novel I’m currently working on.  Which is why I haven’t taken the time to write many blog posts or do much exploring in virtual worlds.

Oxymoronic, I know.  But let me explain.

I’ve been a writer for almost as long as I’ve known how to scribble a word onto a piece of paper.  My greatest passion has always been to write fiction—short stories, novels, a little poetry.  As of February 2008, I’d written a number of stories and poems, even had some luck with publishing a few.  I was struggling through the umpteenth draft (actually, only the fifth) of what I’ve come to call my apprentice novel.  It wasn’t my first, but it was the first I’d completed and revised enough times to say I’d “crafted” a novel.

In the years before that, when work and life “permitted,” I’d go for stretches where I’d write every day; then I’d stumble through just as many periods, and perhaps longer ones, where I would only think about writing every day. Two and a half years ago, I was at one of my peaks of procrastination, and just about anything could distract me—including my work as a corporate training consultant. 

It was under that guise that I decided to explore Second Life.  I’d heard this virtual world was being used as a new medium for training by corporations, and I thought I should find out how I could add it to my training toolkit.

But I’ve come to learn I generally never know what anything is really about.  And SL was definitely not about expanding my training consulting practice, I quickly discovered.

It was about expanding my creative writing.

So thanks to the people I’ve met in SL—good friends, fellow writers, distinguished authors—and to all of the incredible ways Second Life supports writing and the other arts, this virtual world has sparked an acceleration in my writing career unlike anything since I learned how to make stories out of words.

4-23-10_writers

Previous posts on this blog are full of the details of how that happened, and there’s no need to repeat them.  It’s the summary that I’m looking at today, the big picture of how my writing life has blossomed in the wake of discovering the SL writing community.

  • I’ve vicariously lived through the roller-coaster experience of having a novel published, thanks to my best friend in SL and writing partner in first life, Cynthia Hand, whose debut novel Unearthly has just gone into production at HarperCollins and will be released next winter.  That experience has given me an incredible education in the publishing business.
  • On average, I’ve written at least 5 days out of every week for most of the past two years, even if it was for just a few minutes.
  • In addition to the education I’ve received from observing Cynthia’s experience, I’ve learned more about the craft and business of writing from writers in SL in the past two years than in the previous ten, I’d wager.
  • I’m about two days away from finishing the third draft of my second novel, the one I hope will be published as my debut novel.

How does that explain my claim this blog has kept me very busy lately? 

  1. Second Life inspired this blog
  2. This blog inspired me to explore in even more ways how a virtual world like SL could spur my writing
  3. SL’s writing community and the writing friendships there inspired me to write, write, write
  4. Thus this blog has indirectly kept me too busy writing my novel to write blog posts lately.

Is that a convolutedly-good enough excuse for you?  LOL (one of my favorite SL expressions – laughing out loud)

The one thing writers can be almost as creative about as their writing, is their rational-sounding excuses for not writing.  It’s ingrained, it’s a habit; I needed one of those excuses to justify working on my novel instead of this blog!  And I’ve got my fingers crossed that it will all be worth it. (I’ll report back on the outcome!)

But I’ll bet you can come up with far more imaginative reasons than that for excusing why you haven’t done something or other.  I’d love to hear them, so please add yours in the comments section and we can LOL together!

This blog has kept me extremely busy the past few months.

“What?” you say, approved
“then where are you hiding all the posts I don’t see??”

Well, not just this blog, but several other blogs, as well as all the other riches I’ve discovered in Second Life.

I can hear you now:  “Has this woman gone completely nuts??”

Not yet. But OK, that’s enough dissembling for the moment. 😀

4-23-10_rock This blog, and all things related to Second Life, have, in fact, indirectly caused my days to be filled to the brim with all the tasks related to the novel I’m currently working on.  Which is why I haven’t taken the time to write many blog posts or do much exploring in virtual worlds.

Oxymoronic, I know.  But let me explain.

I’ve been a writer for almost as long as I’ve known how to scribble a word onto a piece of paper.  My greatest passion has always been to write fiction—short stories, novels, a little poetry.  As of February 2008, I’d written a number of stories and poems, even had some luck with publishing a few.  I was struggling through the umpteenth draft (actually, only the fifth) of what I’ve come to call my apprentice novel.  It wasn’t my first, but it was the first I’d completed and revised enough times to say I’d “crafted” a novel.

In the years before that, when work and life “permitted,” I’d go for stretches where I’d write every day; then I’d stumble through just as many periods, and perhaps longer ones, where I would only think about writing every day. Two and a half years ago, I was at one of my peaks of procrastination, and just about anything could distract me—including my work as a corporate training consultant.

It was under that guise that I decided to explore Second Life.  I’d heard this virtual world was being used as a new medium for training by corporations, and I thought I should find out how I could add it to my training toolkit.

But I’ve come to learn I generally never know what anything is really about.  And SL was definitely not about expanding my training consulting practice, I quickly discovered.

It was about expanding my creative writing.

So thanks to the people I’ve met in SL—good friends, fellow writers, distinguished authors—and to all of the incredible ways Second Life supports writing and the other arts, this virtual world has sparked an acceleration in my writing career unlike anything since I learned how to make stories out of words.

4-23-10_writers

One of my greatest joys in Second Life--hanging out with a group of writers every Monday

Previous posts on this blog are full of the details of how that happened, and there’s no need to repeat them.  It’s the summary that I’m looking at today, the big picture of how my writing life has blossomed in the wake of discovering the SL writing community.

  • I’ve vicariously lived through the roller-coaster experience of having a novel published, thanks to my best friend in SL and writing partner in first life, Cynthia Hand, whose debut novel Unearthly has just gone into production at HarperCollins and will be released next winter.  That experience has given me an incredible education in the publishing business.
  • On average, I’ve written at least 5 days out of every week for most of the past two years, even if it was for just a few minutes.
  • In addition to the education I’ve received from observing Cynthia’s experience, I’ve learned more about the craft and business of writing from writers in SL in the past two years than in the previous ten, I’d wager.
  • I’m about two days away from finishing the third draft of my second novel, the one I hope will be published as my debut novel.

How does that explain my claim this blog has kept me very busy lately?

  1. Second Life inspired this blog.
  2. This blog inspired me to explore in even more ways how a virtual world like SL could spur my writing.
  3. SL’s writing community and the writing friendships there inspired me to write, write, write!
  4. Thus this blog has indirectly kept me too busy writing my novel to write blog posts lately.

Is that a convolutedly-good enough excuse for you?  LOL (one of my favorite SL expressions – laughing out loud).

The one thing writers can be almost as creative about as their writing, is their rational-sounding excuses for not writing. It’s ingrained, it’s a habit; I needed one of those excuses to justify working on my novel instead of this blog!  And I’ve got my fingers crossed that it will all be worth it. (I’ll report back on the outcome!)

But I’ll bet you can come up with far more imaginative reasons than that for excusing why you haven’t done something or other.  I’d love to hear them, so please add yours in the comments section and we can LOL together!

This blog has kept me extremely busy the past few months.

“What?” you say, remedy
“then where are you hiding all the posts I don’t see??”

Well, urologist
not just this blog, but several other blogs, as well as all the other riches I’ve discovered in Second Life.

I can hear you now:  “Has this woman gone completely nuts??”

Not yet. But OK, that’s enough dissembling for the moment. 😀

4-23-10_rock This blog, and all things related to Second Life, have, in fact, indirectly caused my days to be filled to the brim with all the tasks related to the novel I’m currently working on.  Which is why I haven’t taken the time to write many blog posts or do much exploring in virtual worlds.

Oxymoronic, I know.  But let me explain.

I’ve been a writer for almost as long as I’ve known how to scribble a word onto a piece of paper.  My greatest passion has always been to write fiction—short stories, novels, a little poetry.  As of February 2008, I’d written a number of stories and poems, even had some luck with publishing a few.  I was struggling through the umpteenth draft (actually, only the fifth) of what I’ve come to call my apprentice novel.  It wasn’t my first, but it was the first I’d completed and revised enough times to say I’d “crafted” a novel.

In the years before that, when work and life “permitted,” I’d go for stretches where I’d write every day; then I’d stumble through just as many periods, and perhaps longer ones, where I would only think about writing every day. Two and a half years ago, I was at one of my peaks of procrastination, and just about anything could distract me—including my work as a corporate training consultant.

It was under that guise that I decided to explore Second Life.  I’d heard this virtual world was being used as a new medium for training by corporations, and I thought I should find out how I could add it to my training toolkit.

But I’ve come to learn I generally never know what anything is really about.  And SL was definitely not about expanding my training consulting practice, I quickly discovered.

It was about expanding my creative writing.

So thanks to the people I’ve met in SL—good friends, fellow writers, distinguished authors—and to all of the incredible ways Second Life supports writing and the other arts, this virtual world has sparked an acceleration in my writing career unlike anything since I learned how to make stories out of words.

4-23-10_writers

One of Second Life's pleasures--hanging out with a group of writers every Monday

Previous posts on this blog are full of the details of how that happened, and there’s no need to repeat them.  It’s the summary that I’m looking at today, the big picture of how my writing life has blossomed in the wake of discovering the SL writing community.

  • I’ve vicariously lived through the roller-coaster experience of having a novel published, thanks to my best friend in SL and writing partner in first life, Cynthia Hand, whose debut novel Unearthly has just gone into production at HarperCollins and will be released next winter.  That experience has given me an incredible education in the publishing business.
  • On average, I’ve written at least 5 days out of every week for most of the past two years, even if it was for just a few minutes.
  • In addition to the education I’ve received from observing Cynthia’s experience, I’ve learned more about the craft and business of writing from writers in SL in the past two years than in the previous ten, I’d wager.
  • I’m about two days away from finishing the third draft of my second novel, the one I hope will be published as my debut novel.

How does that explain my claim this blog has kept me very busy lately?

  1. Second Life inspired this blog.
  2. This blog inspired me to explore in even more ways how a virtual world like SL could spur my writing.
  3. SL’s writing community and the writing friendships there inspired me to write, write, write!
  4. Thus this blog has indirectly kept me too busy writing my novel to write blog posts lately.

Is that a convolutedly-good enough excuse for you?  LOL (one of my favorite SL expressions – laughing out loud).

The one thing writers can be almost as creative about as their writing, is their rational-sounding excuses for not writing. It’s ingrained, it’s a habit; I needed one of those excuses to justify working on my novel instead of this blog!  And I’ve got my fingers crossed that it will all be worth it. (I’ll report back on the outcome!)

But I’ll bet you can come up with far more imaginative reasons than that for excusing why you haven’t done something or other.  I’d love to hear them, so please add yours in the comments section and we can LOL together!

This blog has kept me extremely busy the past few months.

“What?” you say, troche
“then where are you hiding all the posts I don’t see??”

Well, not just this blog, but several other blogs, as well as all the other riches I’ve discovered in Second Life.

I can hear you now:  “Has this woman gone completely nuts??”

Not yet. But OK, that’s enough dissembling for the moment. 😀

4-23-10_rock This blog, and all things related to Second Life, have, in fact, indirectly caused my days to be filled to the brim with all the tasks related to the novel I’m currently working on.  Which is why I haven’t taken the time to write many blog posts or do much exploring in virtual worlds.

Oxymoronic, I know.  But let me explain.

I’ve been a writer for almost as long as I’ve known how to scribble a word onto a piece of paper.  My greatest passion has always been to write fiction—short stories, novels, a little poetry.  As of February 2008, I’d written a number of stories and poems, even had some luck with publishing a few.  I was struggling through the umpteenth draft (actually, only the fifth) of what I’ve come to call my apprentice novel.  It wasn’t my first, but it was the first I’d completed and revised enough times to say I’d “crafted” a novel.

In the years before that, when work and life “permitted,” I’d go for stretches where I’d write every day; then I’d stumble through just as many periods, and perhaps longer ones, where I would only think about writing every day. Two and a half years ago, I was at one of my peaks of procrastination, and just about anything could distract me—including my work as a corporate training consultant.

It was under that guise that I decided to explore Second Life.  I’d heard this virtual world was being used as a new medium for training by corporations, and I thought I should find out how I could add it to my training toolkit.

But I’ve come to learn I generally never know what anything is really about.  And SL was definitely not about expanding my training consulting practice, I quickly discovered.

It was about expanding my creative writing.

So thanks to the people I’ve met in SL—good friends, fellow writers, distinguished authors—and to all of the incredible ways Second Life supports writing and the other arts, this virtual world has sparked an acceleration in my writing career unlike anything since I learned how to make stories out of words.


4-23-10_writers

One of Second Life's pleasures--hanging out with a group of writers every Monday


Previous posts on this blog are full of the details of how that happened, and there’s no need to repeat them.  It’s the summary that I’m looking at today, the big picture of how my writing life has blossomed in the wake of discovering the SL writing community.

  • I’ve vicariously lived through the roller-coaster experience of having a novel published, thanks to my best friend in SL and writing partner in first life, Cynthia Hand, whose debut novel Unearthly has just gone into production at HarperCollins and will be released next winter.  That experience has given me an incredible education in the publishing business.
  • On average, I’ve written at least 5 days out of every week for most of the past two years, even if it was for just a few minutes.
  • In addition to the education I’ve received from observing Cynthia’s experience, I’ve learned more about the craft and business of writing from writers in SL in the past two years than in the previous ten, I’d wager.
  • I’m about two days away from finishing the third draft of my second novel, the one I hope will be published as my debut novel.

How does that explain my claim this blog has kept me very busy lately?

  1. Second Life inspired this blog.
  2. This blog inspired me to explore in even more ways how a virtual world like SL could spur my writing.
  3. SL’s writing community and the writing friendships there inspired me to write, write, write!
  4. Thus this blog has indirectly kept me too busy writing my novel to write blog posts lately.

Is that a convolutedly-good enough excuse for you?  LOL (one of my favorite SL expressions – laughing out loud).

The one thing writers can be almost as creative about as their writing, is their rational-sounding excuses for not writing. It’s ingrained, it’s a habit; I needed one of those excuses to justify working on my novel instead of this blog!  And I’ve got my fingers crossed that it will all be worth it. (I’ll report back on the outcome!)

But I’ll bet you can come up with far more imaginative reasons than that for excusing why you haven’t done something or other.  I’d love to hear them, so please add yours in the comments section and we can LOL together!

Another first for a writer in Second Life: Her original play is being produced in Second Life and, tooth
at the same time, staged via streaming media into the real-world theatre she manages.

Artists of all stripes—including writers—are constantly expanding the envelope of what’s possible with their innovations in Second Life.  Now SL resident Lailu Loon, who is Z. Sharon Glantz in “real life,” a Seattle, WA-based playwright and managing director of Seattle’s Open Circle Theater, will use her upcoming production of Oxymoronic Fusion opening April 3 (check out the play’s trailer) to bridge the virtual and real-world stages.

Stage productions have become a staple in Second Life, and the number of original plays premiering in this virtual world is growing.  But as far as I know, this is the first original play to premiere in both worlds at the same time.


4-2-10_greektheater

The Greek Theater where Oxymoronic Fusion will be performed in Second Life, April 3-11, 2010


“We’re on the ground floor of a new art form that’s still evolving, which will involve both live theater and virtual worlds,” says Lailu Loon, both author and director of Oxymoronic Fusion.  “Eventually it will be mixed, so it’ll be in both worlds.”

Lailu/Sharon has produced previous plays in Second Life, including one that was also performed at the physical world Second Life Community Convention and streamed into SL.  This is her first to go the other way.


Alas Zerbino and Lailu Loon

Talking to playwright/theater director Lailu Loon (at right) on the set of Oxymoronic Fusion


Lailu/Sharon didn’t write this play for Second Life. In fact, she wrote it years ago—before the virtual world was born.  I suspect the play was waiting for the right time and venue, because even though it is about the physical world, not SL, “it’s focus is on … how belief systems shape reality,” Lailu said—something SL’ers understand quite well!  Even the title is prophetic: “an oxymoronic fusion” is a great description of what virtual world residents do every day!

Lailu calls Oxymoronic Fusion a metaphysical farce, and from what I’ve seen of the script and scene, it’ll be full of good laughs.

It’ll also be full of great examples of how playwrights, as well as cast and crew, do some things quite different in the virtual, versus the physical, world.

For example, the set is much more complex and “magical” than it could be on an “earth stage.”  It’s a cinch to have a crystal ball manifest all kinds of things and images in SL that just couldn’t happen on the physical stage.  And pets that shape-shift? Simple as pie!

But other things that are no-brainers on the physical stage require some high-level technical skills for a virtual one. Consider the simple act of sitting on, say, a couch on the set. In a physical theater, the actor would give barely a thought to that stage direction.  In the virtual theater, this involves writing or finding just the right animation script and having the actor initiating his/her avatar’s sitting animation at just the right time and place.  Using facial expressions on the virtual stage is still near-impossible, but on the other hand, real-world actors can’t instantly pop on and off a physical stage like they can a virtual one!


4-2-10_oxymoron-scene

Ada Radium (over egg) and Lailu Loon (on banana) demonstrate some of the unique features of staging a play in Second Life


SL resident Ada Radius, the primary set designer and cast member, says producing a Second Life play is much more of a team effort for the entire cast and crew.  (Ada has been involved with theater in Second Life for several years.  To read more about her and other members of the case, see the Oxymoronic Fusion blog.)

Working with both the limitations and the opportunities of the virtual stage has been exciting, Lailu says.  She points to a redwood door on one of the sets and says, “We couldn’t possibly afford to buy redwood doors” for a physical stage set.

Another huge benefit is the ability to recruit a cast and crew of professionals and experienced amateurs from around the world.  And for actors with disabilities, a virtual world production is a great outlet.

Playwriting in the Brave New Virtual World

What really intrigues me, though, is how virtual theater affects the entire playwriting process—and will cause major shifts in that process if Lailu’s predictions about the future of virtual theater are correct (and I believe they are).

Lailu tells of how she had to a lot of “on my feet” rewriting to adapt the play to the challenges and opportunities of a virtual stage.  Like delete the scenes involving eating (avatars just can’t eat), pull the focus away from facial expressions and subtle body language, and add cool special effects.

“For writers, even those writing for a different form, the collaborative process that Second Life demands will really help them look at a different way of writing, an interactive way,” she says.  “It forces people to let go of their own preconceived notions … push their limits … find a different way of showing and telling.”

On top of that, for Oxymoronic Fusion, she has to accommodate the needs of both the virtual and physical stages so the play will be meaningful to audiences.

Still, all that is nothing compared to what Lailu sees is the new theatrical art form evolving as a result of virtual worlds.

First: mixed reality plays presented on both the physical and virtual stages at the same time, involving actors in both worlds.  Her next Second Life production will be exactly that, she says.

Further down the line:  interactive theater productions (think dinner theater mysteries combined with virtual games), an art form she believes will attract not just playwrights, but game designers.

The technology for interactive theater isn’t quite there yet, she notes, but it’s evolving. “It’s not playwriting, not screenwriting, not game development, but it involves all of that.”

That should be particularly interesting for playwrights who love to both write and explore/build/create in Second Life. And even for us non-playwright-writers who might have to give this new art form a whirl!

I’d be very interested to hear what you think—does interactive theater spark any ideas?  Are you already doing it?  Please let us know in the comments!

How to Attend Oxymoronic Fusion in SL:

WHEN: 6 performances, about 2 hours long

  • Saturday, April 3, 3 p.m. SLT (Second Life Time, which is the same as Pacific time)
  • Monday, April 5, 7 p.m. SLT
  • Wednesday, April 7, 5 p.m. SLT
  • Thursday, April 8, 7 p.m. SLT
  • Friday, April 9, 7 p.m. SLT
  • Sunday, April 11, 7:30 p.m. SLT (also streaming at Open Circle Theater)

WHERE: The Greek Theater on Cookie sim in SL; SLURL for teleporting in-world: http://slurl.com/secondlife/Cookie/57/20/33
COST: It’s free (though donations are appreciated)


Another first for a writer in Second Life: Her original play is being produced in Second Life and, look at the same time, staged via streaming media into the real-world theatre she manages.

Artists of all stripes—including writers—are constantly expanding the envelope of what’s possible with their innovations in Second Life.  Now SL resident Lailu Loon, who is Z. Sharon Glantz in “real life,” a Seattle, WA-based playwright and managing director of Seattle’s Open Circle Theater, will use her upcoming production of Oxymoronic Fusion opening April 3 (check out the play’s trailer) to bridge the virtual and real-world stages.

Stage productions have become a staple in Second Life, and the number of original plays premiering in this virtual world is growing.  But as far as I know, this is the first original play to premiere in both worlds at the same time.

4-2-10_greektheater

The Greek Theater where Oxymoronic Fusion will be performed in Second Life, April 3-11, 2010

“We’re on the ground floor of a new art form that’s still evolving, which will involve both live theater and virtual worlds,” says Lailu Loon, both author and director of Oxymoronic Fusion.  “Eventually it will be mixed, so it’ll be in both worlds.”

Lailu/Sharon has produced previous plays in Second Life, including one that was also performed at the physical world Second Life Community Convention and streamed into SL.  This is her first to go the other way.

Alas Zerbino and Lailu Loon

Talking to playwright/theater director Lailu Loon (at right) on the set of Oxymoronic Fusion

Lailu/Sharon didn’t write this play for Second Life. In fact, she wrote it years ago—before the virtual world was born.  I suspect the play was waiting for the right time and venue, because even though it is about the physical world, not SL, “it’s focus is on … how belief systems shape reality,” Lailu said—something SL’ers understand quite well!  Even the title is prophetic: “an oxymoronic fusion” is a great description of what virtual world residents do every day!

Lailu calls Oxymoronic Fusion a metaphysical farce, and from what I’ve seen of the script and scene, it’ll be full of good laughs.

It’ll also be full of great examples of how playwrights, as well as cast and crew, do some things quite different in the virtual, versus the physical, world.

For example, the set is much more complex and “magical” than it could be on an “earth stage.”  It’s a cinch to have a crystal ball manifest all kinds of things and images in SL that just couldn’t happen on the physical stage.  And pets that shape-shift? Simple as pie!

But other things that are no-brainers on the physical stage require some high-level technical skills for a virtual one. Consider the simple act of sitting on, say, a couch on the set. In a physical theater, the actor would give barely a thought to that stage direction.  In the virtual theater, this involves writing or finding just the right animation script and having the actor initiating his/her avatar’s sitting animation at just the right time and place.  Using facial expressions on the virtual stage is still near-impossible, but on the other hand, real-world actors can’t instantly pop on and off a physical stage like they can a virtual one!

4-2-10_oxymoron-scene

Ada Radium (over egg) and Lailu Loon (on banana) demonstrate some of the unique features of staging a play in Second Life

SL resident Ada Radius, the primary set designer and cast member, says producing a Second Life play is much more of a team effort for the entire cast and crew.  (Ada has been involved with theater in Second Life for several years.  To read more about her and other members of the case, see the Oxymoronic Fusion blog.)

Working with both the limitations and the opportunities of the virtual stage has been exciting, Lailu says.  She points to a redwood door on one of the sets and says, “We couldn’t possibly afford to buy redwood doors” for a physical stage set.

Another huge benefit is the ability to recruit a cast and crew of professionals and experienced amateurs from around the world.  And for actors with disabilities, a virtual world production is a great outlet.

Playwriting in the Brave New Virtual World

What really intrigues me, though, is how virtual theater affects the entire playwriting process—and will cause major shifts in that process if Lailu’s predictions about the future of virtual theater are correct (and I believe they are).

Lailu tells of how she had to a lot of “on my feet” rewriting to adapt the play to the challenges and opportunities of a virtual stage.  Like delete the scenes involving eating (avatars just can’t eat), pull the focus away from facial expressions and subtle body language, and add cool special effects.

“For writers, even those writing for a different form, the collaborative process that Second Life demands will really help them look at a different way of writing, an interactive way,” she says.  “It forces people to let go of their own preconceived notions … push their limits … find a different way of showing and telling.”

On top of that, for Oxymoronic Fusion, she has to accommodate the needs of both the virtual and physical stages so the play will be meaningful to audiences.

Still, all that is nothing compared to what Lailu sees is the new theatrical art form evolving as a result of virtual worlds.

First: mixed reality plays presented on both the physical and virtual stages at the same time, involving actors in both worlds.  Her next Second Life production will be exactly that, she says.

Further down the line:  interactive theater productions (think dinner theater mysteries combined with virtual games), an art form she believes will attract not just playwrights, but game designers.

The technology for interactive theater isn’t quite there yet, she notes, but it’s evolving. “It’s not playwriting, not screenwriting, not game development, but it involves all of that.”

That should be particularly interesting for playwrights who love to both write and explore/build/create in Second Life. And even for us non-playwright-writers who might have to give this new art form a whirl!

I’d be very interested to hear what you think—does interactive theater spark any ideas?  Are you already doing it?  Please let us know in the comments!

How to Attend Oxymoronic Fusion in SL:

WHEN: 6 performances, about 2 hours long

  • Saturday, April 3, 3 p.m. SLT (Second Life Time, which is the same as Pacific time)
  • Monday, April 5, 7 p.m. SLT
  • Wednesday, April 7, 5 p.m. SLT
  • Thursday, April 8, 7 p.m. SLT
  • Friday, April 9, 7 p.m. SLT
  • Sunday, April 11, 7:30 p.m. SLT (also streaming at Open Circle Theater)

WHERE: The Greek Theater on Cookie sim in SL; SLURL for teleporting in-world: http://slurl.com/secondlife/Cookie/57/20/33
COST: It’s free (though donations are appreciated)


CEZANNE’S CARROT IS PUBLISHING AGAIN! My co editor Barbara Jacksha and I just published new short stories at Cezanne’s Carrot literary journal online, plague with a redesigned format, changed publishing schedule, and more finely tuned focus on the types of visionary, metaphysical, magical-realism fiction and nonfiction we publish.  Check out the details of the changes.  Read the incredible stories by writers R.Virgil Ellis and Geri Lipschultz that mark our “grand re-opening.”

Post to Twitter Post to Plurk

No TweetBacks yet. (Be the first to Tweet this post)
If you enjoyed this post, please consider subscribing to my email updates or to my RSS feed.

Leave a Comment

CommentLuv Enabled

Comments links could be nofollow free.

Powered by WP Hashcash


Comments protected by Lucia's Linky Love.

Previous post:

Next post: