Poets: A Wealth of Open Mics Await You in Second Life (1st in a series)

by Joan Kremer on September 29, 2008 · 1 comment

in Benefits of SL,Events,Places for writers

What writer’s toolbox does NOT include that basic implement we call the writing prompt?  For many of us, viagra buy ask a writing prompt is equivalent to the common hammer or screwdriver.  It’s ubiquitous, ailment useful for just about any construction or repair job, otolaryngologist and often works better than a bucket-load of more sophisticated tools.

INKsters Daily Writing Competition

Second Life headquarters for INKsters and the group’s daily writing prompts.

So of course the writer’s prompt has made it into Second Life.  But one SL group, INKsters, is particularly great at getting us sometimes slacker writers to pick up that tool and actually pound out a few paragraphs on a regular basis.

How?  By making it fun, easy, and financially rewarding!

INKsters Competitive Writing Group is the brainchild of the writer behind the hilariously named ItsNaughtKnotty Cannned avatar (note the three capital letter in the first name spell INK).  She speaks for a lot of us writers in Second Life when she says she’s “positively intoxicated by the literary community in Second Life.” The daily writing prompts/competition is one way she spreads the “high” around.

As ItsNaughtKnotty herself explains it:

“The INKsters give you a mechanism, loads of encouragement, and maybe a hint of guilt now and again, all in an attempt to spur you on to becoming a successful writer. I started this group . . . because I wanted to force myself to write everyday and hoped a few people wanted to try to do the same thing. Since then hundreds of people have thought the idea made a lot of sense and I’ve published more fiction than in the rest of my life combined.”

INKsters was one of the first writing groups I discovered in Second Life, and ever since, I’ve been encouraged, guilted, and humored into markedly increasing my daily writing output, thanks to their daily writing prompts.

Second Life headquarters for INKsters and the group’s daily writing prompts.Second Life home of ItsNaughtKnotty Canned, founder of INKsters daily writing competition

The prompts range all over tarnation and back, as you might expect.  ItsNaughtKnotty, with the help of others in the gang, comes up with a month’s worth of prompts at a time–sometimes centered around a theme; other times not.  But it doesn’t matter, because the point is to get you writing–about anything you can.

“They’re designed to expand your mind and suggest a possible direction for you today. Please think divergently and create something beautiful, funny, poignant, interesting or informative,” says ItsNaughtKnotty.

The really cool and motivating aspect of the INKsters daily writing prompts is this:  You know whatever you submit will be actually read by someone (ItsNaughtKnotty herself), and if she picks your submission as the day’s winning entry, you will be paid real money.

(Well, truthfully, it’s not a lot of real money–somewhere in the neighborhood of about a penny in US currency–but it’s 25 Linden Dollars, which is a large enough amount to look very nice in one’s Second Life bank account.)  Plus, INKsters publishes all entries (with winners’ appropriately noted) in a monthly Second Life equivalent of a photocopied ‘zine that’s sent to all INKsters group members and made available to all Second Life residents.

Because of INKsters, I’ve been wielding the writing-prompt tool a lot this year–and have a lot more creative writing to show for it.  Even though I only enter the contest a fraction of the time (usually because I can’t get my piece down to the 500-word limit, or I forget to submit before the 11:59 p.m. cutoff).

Plus, I’ve grabbed the brass ring three times in the few months I’ve been tracking the contest. (Of course, two of those three wins were shared with everyone else who submitted that day, because ItsNaughtKnotty liked them all, but still, she liked mine, too!)

Yet even when I don’t win the daily contest, I feel like winner just because I’ve spent that much more time focused on my writing.  And it never hurts to re-read what ItsNaughtKnotty says about the “vagaries of competition”:

“Sometimes your most beautiful work ever is overlooked in the judging process, and sometimes a total piece of poop wins, and those of us who’ve been writers for a long time are so used to this, we don’t even notice it anymore. We hope you understand completing and submitting your writing makes you a champion. The competition is a motivational tactic to help all of us feel a sense of urgency to create something beautiful from nothingness every day.”

How can you not want to write every day with a cheerleader like that on your side?

To get the aid of the writing prompts, you don’t even have to have a Second Life account.  Each day’s prompts are posted on the INKsters blog.

But to enter the writing contest, you do need to step into Second Life and deposit your writing in the mailbox that “Shakespeare” manages at the INKsters headquarters in Second Life.  (And it’s worth your while many times over to join the INKsters SL group, which you can also do with “Shakespeare’s” assistance.)

So if you’re in Second Life, or thinking about going there, head on over to INKsters’ welcoming corner of Second Life and discover the amazing usefulness and fun of the daily INKsters writing prompt and competition.  And if you’re not, make the INKsters blog a regular stop on your daily writing journey.

The virtual world offers many more tools for us writers, of course!  What have you found in Second Life that’s enhanced your writing practice?  It’s a big virtual world out there, and I’d love to hear about what you’ve found!



What writer’s toolbox does NOT include that basic implement we call the writing prompt?  For many of us, see a writing prompt is equivalent to the common hammer or screwdriver.  It’s ubiquitous, caries useful for just about any construction or repair job, and often works better than a bucket-load of more sophisticated tools.

INKsters Daily Writing Competition

Second Life headquarters for INKsters and the group’s daily writing prompts. The blue mailbox on the left is where you submit your prompt.

So of course the writer’s prompt has made it into Second Life.  But one SL group, INKsters, is particularly great at getting us sometimes slacker writers to pick up that tool and actually pound out a few paragraphs on a regular basis.

How?  By making it fun, easy, and financially rewarding!

INKsters Competitive Writing Group is the brainchild of the writer behind the hilariously named ItsNaughtKnotty Cannned avatar (note the three capital letter in the first name spell INK).  She speaks for a lot of us writers in Second Life when she says she’s “positively intoxicated by the literary community in Second Life.” The daily writing prompts/competition is one way she spreads the “high” around.

As ItsNaughtKnotty herself explains it:

“The INKsters give you a mechanism, loads of encouragement, and maybe a hint of guilt now and again, all in an attempt to spur you on to becoming a successful writer. I started this group . . . because I wanted to force myself to write everyday and hoped a few people wanted to try to do the same thing. Since then hundreds of people have thought the idea made a lot of sense and I’ve published more fiction than in the rest of my life combined.”

INKsters was one of the first writing groups I discovered in Second Life, and ever since, I’ve been encouraged, guilted, and humored into markedly increasing my daily writing output, thanks to their daily writing prompts.

Below is the Second Life home of ItsNaughtKnotty Canned, founder of INKsters daily writing competition.Second Life home of ItsNaughtKnotty Canned, founder of INKsters daily writing competition

The prompts range all over tarnation and back, as you might expect.  ItsNaughtKnotty, with the help of others in the gang, comes up with a month’s worth of prompts at a time–sometimes centered around a theme; other times not.  But it doesn’t matter, because the point is to get you writing–about anything you can.

“They’re designed to expand your mind and suggest a possible direction for you today. Please think divergently and create something beautiful, funny, poignant, interesting or informative,” says ItsNaughtKnotty.

The really cool and motivating aspect of the INKsters daily writing prompts is this:  You know whatever you submit will be actually read by someone (ItsNaughtKnotty herself), and if she picks your submission as the day’s winning entry, you will be paid real money.

(Well, truthfully, it’s not a lot of real money–somewhere in the neighborhood of about a penny in US currency–but it’s 25 Linden Dollars, which is a large enough amount to look very nice in one’s Second Life bank account.)  Plus, INKsters publishes all entries (with winners’ appropriately noted) in a monthly Second Life equivalent of a photocopied ‘zine that’s sent to all INKsters group members and made available to all Second Life residents.

Because of INKsters, I’ve been wielding the writing-prompt tool a lot this year–and have a lot more creative writing to show for it.  Even though I only enter the contest a fraction of the time (usually because I can’t get my piece down to the 500-word limit, or I forget to submit before the 11:59 p.m. cutoff).

Plus, I’ve grabbed the brass ring three times in the few months I’ve been tracking the contest. (Of course, two of those three wins were shared with everyone else who submitted that day, because ItsNaughtKnotty liked them all, but still, she liked mine, too!)

Yet even when I don’t win the daily contest, I feel like winner just because I’ve spent that much more time focused on my writing.  And it never hurts to re-read what ItsNaughtKnotty says about the “vagaries of competition”:

“Sometimes your most beautiful work ever is overlooked in the judging process, and sometimes a total piece of poop wins, and those of us who’ve been writers for a long time are so used to this, we don’t even notice it anymore. We hope you understand completing and submitting your writing makes you a champion. The competition is a motivational tactic to help all of us feel a sense of urgency to create something beautiful from nothingness every day.”

How can you not want to write every day with a cheerleader like that on your side?

To get the aid of the writing prompts, you don’t even have to have a Second Life account.  Each day’s prompts are posted on the INKsters blog.

But to enter the writing contest, you do need to step into Second Life and deposit your writing in the mailbox that “Shakespeare” manages at the INKsters headquarters in Second Life.  (And it’s worth your while many times over to join the INKsters SL group, which you can also do with “Shakespeare’s” assistance.)

So if you’re in Second Life, or thinking about going there, head on over to INKsters’ welcoming corner of Second Life and discover the amazing usefulness and fun of the daily INKsters writing prompt and competition.  And if you’re not, make the INKsters blog a regular stop on your daily writing journey.

The virtual world offers many more tools for us writers, of course!  What have you found in Second Life that’s enhanced your writing practice?  It’s a big virtual world out there, and I’d love to hear about what you’ve found!



What writer’s toolbox does NOT include that basic implement we call the writing prompt?  For many of us, buy a writing prompt is equivalent to the common hammer or screwdriver.  It’s ubiquitous, useful for just about any construction or repair job, and often works better than a bucket-load of more sophisticated tools.

INKsters Daily Writing Competition

Second Life headquarters for INKsters and the group’s daily writing prompts. The blue mailbox on the left is where you submit your prompt response for the daily writing competition.

So of course the writer’s prompt has made it into Second Life.  But one SL group, INKsters, is particularly great at getting us sometimes slacker writers to pick up that tool and actually pound out a few paragraphs on a regular basis.

How?  By making it fun, easy, and financially rewarding!

INKsters Competitive Writing Group is the brainchild of the writer behind the hilariously named ItsNaughtKnotty Cannned avatar (note the three capital letter in the first name spell INK).  She speaks for a lot of us writers in Second Life when she says she’s “positively intoxicated by the literary community in Second Life.” The daily writing prompts/competition is one way she spreads the “high” around.

As ItsNaughtKnotty herself explains it:

“The INKsters give you a mechanism, loads of encouragement, and maybe a hint of guilt now and again, all in an attempt to spur you on to becoming a successful writer. I started this group . . . because I wanted to force myself to write everyday and hoped a few people wanted to try to do the same thing. Since then hundreds of people have thought the idea made a lot of sense and I’ve published more fiction than in the rest of my life combined.”

INKsters was one of the first writing groups I discovered in Second Life, and ever since, I’ve been encouraged, guilted, and humored into markedly increasing my daily writing output, thanks to their daily writing prompts.

Below is the Second Life home of ItsNaughtKnotty Canned, founder of INKsters daily writing competition.Second Life home of ItsNaughtKnotty Canned, founder of INKsters daily writing competition

The prompts range all over tarnation and back, as you might expect.  ItsNaughtKnotty, with the help of others in the gang, comes up with a month’s worth of prompts at a time–sometimes centered around a theme; other times not.  But it doesn’t matter, because the point is to get you writing–about anything you can.

“They’re designed to expand your mind and suggest a possible direction for you today. Please think divergently and create something beautiful, funny, poignant, interesting or informative,” says ItsNaughtKnotty.

The really cool and motivating aspect of the INKsters daily writing prompts is this:  You know whatever you submit will be actually read by someone (ItsNaughtKnotty herself), and if she picks your submission as the day’s winning entry, you will be paid real money.

(Well, truthfully, it’s not a lot of real money–somewhere in the neighborhood of about a penny in US currency–but it’s 25 Linden Dollars, which is a large enough amount to look very nice in one’s Second Life bank account.)  Plus, INKsters publishes all entries (with winners’ appropriately noted) in a monthly Second Life equivalent of a photocopied ‘zine that’s sent to all INKsters group members and made available to all Second Life residents.

Because of INKsters, I’ve been wielding the writing-prompt tool a lot this year–and have a lot more creative writing to show for it.  Even though I only enter the contest a fraction of the time (usually because I can’t get my piece down to the 500-word limit, or I forget to submit before the 11:59 p.m. cutoff).

INKsters anthologies in Second Life

Plus, I’ve grabbed the brass ring three times in the few months I’ve been tracking the contest. (Of course, two of those three wins were shared with everyone else who submitted that day, because ItsNaughtKnotty liked them all, but still, she liked mine, too!)

Yet even when I don’t win the daily contest, I feel like winner just because I’ve spent that much more time focused on my writing.  And it never hurts to re-read what ItsNaughtKnotty says about the “vagaries of competition”:

“Sometimes your most beautiful work ever is overlooked in the judging process, and sometimes a total piece of poop wins, and those of us who’ve been writers for a long time are so used to this, we don’t even notice it anymore. We hope you understand completing and submitting your writing makes you a champion. The competition is a motivational tactic to help all of us feel a sense of urgency to create something beautiful from nothingness every day.”

How can you not want to write every day with a cheerleader like that on your side?

Entrance to the headquarters of INKsters in Second Life virtual world

Entrance to the headquarters of INKsters on the writer-friendly Cookie Island in Second Life.

To get the aid of the writing prompts, you don’t even have to have a Second Life account.  Each day’s prompts are posted on the INKsters blog.

But to enter the writing contest, you do need to step into Second Life and deposit your writing in the mailbox that “Shakespeare” manages at the INKsters headquarters in Second Life.  (And it’s worth your while many times over to join the INKsters SL group, which you can also do with “Shakespeare’s” assistance.)

So if you’re in Second Life, or thinking about going there, head on over to INKsters’ welcoming corner of Second Life and discover the amazing usefulness and fun of the daily INKsters writing prompt and competition.  And if you’re not, make the INKsters blog a regular stop on your daily writing journey.

The virtual world offers many more tools for us writers, of course!  What have you found in Second Life that’s enhanced your writing practice?  It’s a big virtual world out there, and I’d love to hear about what you’ve found!



What writer’s toolbox does NOT include that basic implement we call the writing prompt?  For many of us, patient a writing prompt is equivalent to the common hammer or screwdriver.  It’s ubiquitous, salve useful for just about any construction or repair job, buy more about and often works better than a bucket-load of more sophisticated tools.

INKsters Daily Writing Competition

Second Life headquarters for INKsters and the group’s daily writing prompts. The blue mailbox on the left is where you submit your prompt response for the daily writing competition.

So of course the writer’s prompt has made it into Second Life.  But one SL group, INKsters, is particularly great at getting us sometimes slacker writers to pick up that tool and actually pound out a few paragraphs on a regular basis.

How?  By making it fun, easy, and financially rewarding!

INKsters Competitive Writing Group is the brainchild of the writer behind the hilariously named ItsNaughtKnotty Cannned avatar (note the three capital letter in the first name spell INK).  She speaks for a lot of us writers in Second Life when she says she’s “positively intoxicated by the literary community in Second Life.” The daily writing prompts/competition is one way she spreads the “high” around.

As ItsNaughtKnotty herself explains it:

“The INKsters give you a mechanism, loads of encouragement, and maybe a hint of guilt now and again, all in an attempt to spur you on to becoming a successful writer. I started this group . . . because I wanted to force myself to write everyday and hoped a few people wanted to try to do the same thing. Since then hundreds of people have thought the idea made a lot of sense and I’ve published more fiction than in the rest of my life combined.”


Below is the Second Life home of ItsNaughtKnotty Canned, founder of INKsters daily writing competition.Second Life home of ItsNaughtKnotty Canned, founder of INKsters daily writing competition

INKsters was one of the first writing groups I discovered in Second Life, and ever since, I’ve been encouraged, guilted, and humored into markedly increasing my daily writing output, thanks to their daily writing prompts.

The prompts range all over tarnation and back, as you might expect.  ItsNaughtKnotty, with the help of others in the gang, comes up with a month’s worth of prompts at a time–sometimes centered around a theme; other times not.  But it doesn’t matter, because the point is to get you writing–about anything you can.

“They’re designed to expand your mind and suggest a possible direction for you today. Please think divergently and create something beautiful, funny, poignant, interesting or informative,” says ItsNaughtKnotty.

The really cool and motivating aspect of the INKsters daily writing prompts is this:  You know whatever you submit will be actually read by someone (ItsNaughtKnotty herself), and if she picks your submission as the day’s winning entry, you will be paid real money.

(Well, truthfully, it’s not a lot of real money–somewhere in the neighborhood of about a penny in US currency–but it’s 25 Linden Dollars, which is a large enough amount to look very nice in one’s Second Life bank account.)  Plus, INKsters publishes all entries (with winners’ appropriately noted) in a monthly Second Life equivalent of a photocopied ‘zine that’s sent to all INKsters group members and made available to all Second Life residents.

Because of INKsters, I’ve been wielding the writing-prompt tool a lot this year–and have a lot more creative writing to show for it.  Even though I only enter the contest a fraction of the time (usually because I can’t get my piece down to the 500-word limit, or I forget to submit before the 11:59 p.m. cutoff).

INKsters anthologies in Second Life

Any Second.

Plus, I’ve grabbed the brass ring three times in the few months I’ve been tracking the contest. (Of course, two of those three wins were shared with everyone else who submitted that day, because ItsNaughtKnotty liked them all, but still, she liked mine, too!)

Yet even when I don’t win the daily contest, I feel like winner just because I’ve spent that much more time focused on my writing.  And it never hurts to re-read what ItsNaughtKnotty says about the “vagaries of competition”:

“Sometimes your most beautiful work ever is overlooked in the judging process, and sometimes a total piece of poop wins, and those of us who’ve been writers for a long time are so used to this, we don’t even notice it anymore. We hope you understand completing and submitting your writing makes you a champion. The competition is a motivational tactic to help all of us feel a sense of urgency to create something beautiful from nothingness every day.”

How can you not want to write every day with a cheerleader like that on your side?

To get the aid of the writing prompts, you don’t even have to have a Second Life account.  Each day’s prompts are posted on the INKsters blog.

Entrance to the headquarters of INKsters in Second Life virtual world

Entrance to the headquarters of INKsters on the writer-friendly Cookie Island in Second Life.

But to enter the writing contest, you do need to step into Second Life and deposit your writing in the mailbox that “Shakespeare” manages at the INKsters headquarters in Second Life.  (And it’s worth your while many times over to join the INKsters SL group, which you can also do with “Shakespeare’s” assistance.)

So if you’re in Second Life, or thinking about going there, head on over to INKsters’ welcoming corner of Second Life and discover the amazing usefulness and fun of the daily INKsters writing prompt and competition.  And if you’re not, make the INKsters blog a regular stop on your daily writing journey.

The virtual world offers many more tools for us writers, of course!  What have you found in Second Life that’s enhanced your writing practice?  It’s a big virtual world out there, and I’d love to hear about what you’ve found!



What writer’s toolbox does NOT include that basic implement we call the writing prompt?  For many of us, approved a writing prompt is equivalent to the common hammer or screwdriver.  It’s ubiquitous, remedy useful for just about any construction or repair job, find and often works better than a bucket-load of more sophisticated tools.

INKsters Daily Writing Competition

Second Life headquarters for INKsters and the group’s daily writing prompts. The blue mailbox on the left is where you submit your prompt response for the daily writing competition.

So of course the writer’s prompt has made it into Second Life.  But one SL group, INKsters, is particularly great at getting us sometimes slacker writers to pick up that tool and actually pound out a few paragraphs on a regular basis.

How?  By making it fun, easy, and financially rewarding!

INKsters Competitive Writing Group is the brainchild of the writer behind the hilariously named ItsNaughtKnotty Cannned avatar (note the three capital letter in the first name spell INK).  She speaks for a lot of us writers in Second Life when she says she’s “positively intoxicated by the literary community in Second Life.” The daily writing prompts/competition is one way she spreads the “high” around.

As ItsNaughtKnotty herself explains it:

“The INKsters give you a mechanism, loads of encouragement, and maybe a hint of guilt now and again, all in an attempt to spur you on to becoming a successful writer. I started this group . . . because I wanted to force myself to write everyday and hoped a few people wanted to try to do the same thing. Since then hundreds of people have thought the idea made a lot of sense and I’ve published more fiction than in the rest of my life combined.”

Below is the Second Life home of ItsNaughtKnotty Canned, founder of INKsters daily writing competition.

Second Life home of ItsNaughtKnotty Canned, founder of INKsters daily writing competition

INKsters was one of the first writing groups I discovered in Second Life, and ever since, I’ve been encouraged, guilted, and humored into markedly increasing my daily writing output, thanks to their daily writing prompts.

The prompts range all over tarnation and back, as you might expect.  ItsNaughtKnotty, with the help of others in the gang, comes up with a month’s worth of prompts at a time–sometimes centered around a theme; other times not.  But it doesn’t matter, because the point is to get you writing–about anything you can.

“They’re designed to expand your mind and suggest a possible direction for you today. Please think divergently and create something beautiful, funny, poignant, interesting or informative,” says ItsNaughtKnotty.

The really cool and motivating aspect of the INKsters daily writing prompts is this:  You know whatever you submit will be actually read by someone (ItsNaughtKnotty herself), and if she picks your submission as the day’s winning entry, you will be paid real money.

(Well, truthfully, it’s not a lot of real money–somewhere in the neighborhood of about a penny in US currency–but it’s 25 Linden Dollars, which is a large enough amount to look very nice in one’s Second Life bank account.)  Plus, INKsters publishes all entries (with winners’ appropriately noted) in a monthly Second Life equivalent of a photocopied ‘zine that’s sent to all INKsters group members and made available to all Second Life residents.

Because of INKsters, I’ve been wielding the writing-prompt tool a lot this year–and have a lot more creative writing to show for it.  Even though I only enter the contest a fraction of the time (usually because I can’t get my piece down to the 500-word limit, or I forget to submit before the 11:59 p.m. cutoff).

INKsters anthologies in Second Life

All entries submitted to the daily writing competition are published in monthly anthologies available for free to all Second Life residents.

Plus, I’ve grabbed the brass ring three times in the few months I’ve been tracking the contest. (Of course, two of those three wins were shared with everyone else who submitted that day, because ItsNaughtKnotty liked them all, but still, she liked mine, too!)

Yet even when I don’t win the daily contest, I feel like winner just because I’ve spent that much more time focused on my writing.  And it never hurts to re-read what ItsNaughtKnotty says about the “vagaries of competition”:

“Sometimes your most beautiful work ever is overlooked in the judging process, and sometimes a total piece of poop wins, and those of us who’ve been writers for a long time are so used to this, we don’t even notice it anymore. We hope you understand completing and submitting your writing makes you a champion. The competition is a motivational tactic to help all of us feel a sense of urgency to create something beautiful from nothingness every day.”

How can you not want to write every day with a cheerleader like that on your side?

To get the aid of the writing prompts, you don’t even have to have a Second Life account.  Each day’s prompts are posted on the INKsters blog.

Entrance to the headquarters of INKsters in Second Life virtual world

Entrance to the headquarters of INKsters on the writer-friendly Cookie Island in Second Life.

But to enter the writing contest, you do need to step into Second Life and deposit your writing in the mailbox that “Shakespeare” manages at the INKsters headquarters in Second Life.  (And it’s worth your while many times over to join the INKsters SL group, which you can also do with “Shakespeare’s” assistance.)

So if you’re in Second Life, or thinking about going there, head on over to INKsters’ welcoming corner of Second Life and discover the amazing usefulness and fun of the daily INKsters writing prompt and competition.  And if you’re not, make the INKsters blog a regular stop on your daily writing journey.

The virtual world offers many more tools for us writers, of course!  What have you found in Second Life that’s enhanced your writing practice?  It’s a big virtual world out there, and I’d love to hear about what you’ve found!



What writer’s toolbox does NOT include that basic implement we call the writing prompt?  For many of us, more about a writing prompt is equivalent to the common hammer or screwdriver.  It’s ubiquitous, surgeon useful for just about any construction or repair job, and often works better than a bucket-load of more sophisticated tools.

INKsters Daily Writing Competition

Second Life headquarters for INKsters and the group’s daily writing prompts. The blue mailbox on the left is where you submit your prompt response for the daily writing competition.

So of course the writer’s prompt has made it into Second Life.  But one SL group, INKsters, is particularly great at getting us sometimes slacker writers to pick up that tool and actually pound out a few paragraphs on a regular basis.

How?  By making it fun, easy, and financially rewarding!

INKsters Competitive Writing Group is the brainchild of the writer behind the hilariously named ItsNaughtKnotty Cannned avatar (note the three capital letter in the first name spell INK).  She speaks for a lot of us writers in Second Life when she says she’s “positively intoxicated by the literary community in Second Life.” The daily writing prompts/competition is one way she spreads the “high” around.

As ItsNaughtKnotty herself explains it:

“The INKsters give you a mechanism, loads of encouragement, and maybe a hint of guilt now and again, all in an attempt to spur you on to becoming a successful writer. I started this group . . . because I wanted to force myself to write everyday and hoped a few people wanted to try to do the same thing. Since then hundreds of people have thought the idea made a lot of sense and I’ve published more fiction than in the rest of my life combined.”

Below is the Second Life home of ItsNaughtKnotty Canned, founder of INKsters daily writing competition.

Second Life home of ItsNaughtKnotty Canned, founder of INKsters daily writing competition


INKsters was one of the first writing groups I discovered in Second Life, and ever since, I’ve been encouraged, guilted, and humored into markedly increasing my daily writing output, thanks to their daily writing prompts.

The prompts range all over tarnation and back, as you might expect.  ItsNaughtKnotty, with the help of others in the gang, comes up with a month’s worth of prompts at a time–sometimes centered around a theme; other times not.  But it doesn’t matter, because the point is to get you writing–about anything you can.

“They’re designed to expand your mind and suggest a possible direction for you today. Please think divergently and create something beautiful, funny, poignant, interesting or informative,” says ItsNaughtKnotty.

The really cool and motivating aspect of the INKsters daily writing prompts is this:  You know whatever you submit will be actually read by someone (ItsNaughtKnotty herself), and if she picks your submission as the day’s winning entry, you will be paid real money.

(Well, truthfully, it’s not a lot of real money–somewhere in the neighborhood of about a penny in US currency–but it’s 25 Linden Dollars, which is a large enough amount to look very nice in one’s Second Life bank account.)  Plus, INKsters publishes all entries (with winners’ appropriately noted) in a monthly Second Life equivalent of a photocopied ‘zine that’s sent to all INKsters group members and made available to all Second Life residents.

Because of INKsters, I’ve been wielding the writing-prompt tool a lot this year–and have a lot more creative writing to show for it.  Even though I only enter the contest a fraction of the time (usually because I can’t get my piece down to the 500-word limit, or I forget to submit before the 11:59 p.m. cutoff).

INKsters anthologies in Second Life

All entries submitted to the daily writing competition are published in monthly anthologies available for free to all Second Life residents.

Plus, I’ve grabbed the brass ring three times in the few months I’ve been tracking the contest. (Of course, two of those three wins were shared with everyone else who submitted that day, because ItsNaughtKnotty liked them all, but still, she liked mine, too!)

Yet even when I don’t win the daily contest, I feel like winner just because I’ve spent that much more time focused on my writing.  And it never hurts to re-read what ItsNaughtKnotty says about the “vagaries of competition”:

“Sometimes your most beautiful work ever is overlooked in the judging process, and sometimes a total piece of poop wins, and those of us who’ve been writers for a long time are so used to this, we don’t even notice it anymore. We hope you understand completing and submitting your writing makes you a champion. The competition is a motivational tactic to help all of us feel a sense of urgency to create something beautiful from nothingness every day.”

How can you not want to write every day with a cheerleader like that on your side?

To get the aid of the writing prompts, you don’t even have to have a Second Life account.  Each day’s prompts are posted on the INKsters blog.

Entrance to the headquarters of INKsters in Second Life virtual world

Entrance to the headquarters of INKsters on the writer-friendly Cookie Island in Second Life.

But to enter the writing contest, you do need to step into Second Life and deposit your writing in the mailbox that “Shakespeare” manages at the INKsters headquarters in Second Life.  (And it’s worth your while many times over to join the INKsters SL group, which you can also do with “Shakespeare’s” assistance.)

So if you’re in Second Life, or thinking about going there, head on over to INKsters’ welcoming corner of Second Life and discover the amazing usefulness and fun of the daily INKsters writing prompt and competition.  And if you’re not, make the INKsters blog a regular stop on your daily writing journey.

The virtual world offers many more tools for us writers, of course!  What have you found in Second Life that’s enhanced your writing practice?  It’s a big virtual world out there, and I’d love to hear about what you’ve found!

What writer’s toolbox does NOT include that basic implement we call the writing prompt?  For many of us, adiposity a writing prompt is equivalent to the common hammer or screwdriver.  It’s ubiquitous, check useful for just about any construction or repair job, erectile and often works better than a bucket-load of more sophisticated tools.

INKsters Daily Writing Competition

Second Life headquarters for INKsters and the group’s daily writing prompts. The blue mailbox on the left is where you submit your prompt response for the daily writing competition.

So of course the writer’s prompt has made it into Second Life.  But one SL group, INKsters, is particularly great at getting us sometimes slacker writers to pick up that tool and actually pound out a few paragraphs on a regular basis.

How?  By making it fun, easy, and financially rewarding!

INKsters Competitive Writing Group is the brainchild of the writer behind the hilariously named ItsNaughtKnotty Cannned avatar (note the three capital letter in the first name spell INK).  She speaks for a lot of us writers in Second Life when she says she’s “positively intoxicated by the literary community in Second Life.” The daily writing prompts/competition is one way she spreads the “high” around.

As ItsNaughtKnotty herself explains it:

“The INKsters give you a mechanism, loads of encouragement, and maybe a hint of guilt now and again, all in an attempt to spur you on to becoming a successful writer. I started this group . . . because I wanted to force myself to write everyday and hoped a few people wanted to try to do the same thing. Since then hundreds of people have thought the idea made a lot of sense and I’ve published more fiction than in the rest of my life combined.”

Below is the Second Life home of ItsNaughtKnotty Canned, founder of INKsters daily writing competition.Second Life home of ItsNaughtKnotty Canned, founder of INKsters daily writing competition


INKsters was one of the first writing groups I discovered in Second Life, and ever since, I’ve been encouraged, guilted, and humored into markedly increasing my daily writing output, thanks to their daily writing prompts.

The prompts range all over tarnation and back, as you might expect.  ItsNaughtKnotty, with the help of others in the gang, comes up with a month’s worth of prompts at a time–sometimes centered around a theme; other times not.  But it doesn’t matter, because the point is to get you writing–about anything you can.

“They’re designed to expand your mind and suggest a possible direction for you today. Please think divergently and create something beautiful, funny, poignant, interesting or informative,” says ItsNaughtKnotty.

The really cool and motivating aspect of the INKsters daily writing prompts is this:  You know whatever you submit will be actually read by someone (ItsNaughtKnotty herself), and if she picks your submission as the day’s winning entry, you will be paid real money.

(Well, truthfully, it’s not a lot of real money–somewhere in the neighborhood of about a penny in US currency–but it’s 25 Linden Dollars, which is a large enough amount to look very nice in one’s Second Life bank account.)  Plus, INKsters publishes all entries (with winners’ appropriately noted) in a monthly Second Life equivalent of a photocopied ‘zine that’s sent to all INKsters group members and made available to all Second Life residents.

Because of INKsters, I’ve been wielding the writing-prompt tool a lot this year–and have a lot more creative writing to show for it.  Even though I only enter the contest a fraction of the time (usually because I can’t get my piece down to the 500-word limit, or I forget to submit before the 11:59 p.m. cutoff).

INKsters anthologies in Second Life

All entries submitted to the daily writing competition are published in monthly anthologies available for free to all Second Life residents.

Plus, I’ve grabbed the brass ring three times in the few months I’ve been tracking the contest. (Of course, two of those three wins were shared with everyone else who submitted that day, because ItsNaughtKnotty liked them all, but still, she liked mine, too!)

Yet even when I don’t win the daily contest, I feel like winner just because I’ve spent that much more time focused on my writing.  And it never hurts to re-read what ItsNaughtKnotty says about the “vagaries of competition”:

“Sometimes your most beautiful work ever is overlooked in the judging process, and sometimes a total piece of poop wins, and those of us who’ve been writers for a long time are so used to this, we don’t even notice it anymore. We hope you understand completing and submitting your writing makes you a champion. The competition is a motivational tactic to help all of us feel a sense of urgency to create something beautiful from nothingness every day.”

How can you not want to write every day with a cheerleader like that on your side?

To get the aid of the writing prompts, you don’t even have to have a Second Life account.  Each day’s prompts are posted on the INKsters blog.

Entrance to the headquarters of INKsters in Second Life virtual world

Entrance to the headquarters of INKsters on the writer-friendly Cookie Island in Second Life.

But to enter the writing contest, you do need to step into Second Life and deposit your writing in the mailbox that “Shakespeare” manages at the INKsters headquarters in Second Life.  (And it’s worth your while many times over to join the INKsters SL group, which you can also do with “Shakespeare’s” assistance.)

So if you’re in Second Life, or thinking about going there, head on over to INKsters’ welcoming corner of Second Life and discover the amazing usefulness and fun of the daily INKsters writing prompt and competition.  And if you’re not, make the INKsters blog a regular stop on your daily writing journey.

The virtual world offers many more tools for us writers, of course!  What have you found in Second Life that’s enhanced your writing practice?  It’s a big virtual world out there, and I’d love to hear about what you’ve found!

What writer’s toolbox does NOT include that basic implement we call the writing prompt?  For many of us, anesthetist a writing prompt is equivalent to the common hammer or screwdriver.  It’s ubiquitous, viagra order useful for just about any construction or repair job, health and often works better than a bucket-load of more sophisticated tools.

INKsters Daily Writing Competition

Second Life headquarters for INKsters and the group’s daily writing prompts. The blue mailbox on the left is where you submit your prompt response for the daily writing competition.

So of course the writer’s prompt has made it into Second LifeBut one SL group, INKsters, is particularly great at getting us sometimes-slacker writers to pick up that tool and actually pound out a few paragraphs on a regular basis.

How?  By making it fun, easy, and financially rewarding!

INKsters Competitive Writing Group is the brainchild of the writer behind the hilariously named ItsNaughtKnotty Cannned avatar (note the three capital letter in the first name spell INK).  She speaks for a lot of us writers in Second Life when she says she’s “positively intoxicated by the literary community in Second Life.” The daily writing prompts/competition is one way she spreads the “high” around.

As ItsNaughtKnotty herself explains it:

“The INKsters give you a mechanism, loads of encouragement, and maybe a hint of guilt now and again, all in an attempt to spur you on to becoming a successful writer. I started this group . . . because I wanted to force myself to write everyday and hoped a few people wanted to try to do the same thing. Since then hundreds of people have thought the idea made a lot of sense and I’ve published more fiction than in the rest of my life combined.”

Below is the Second Life home of ItsNaughtKnotty Canned, founder of INKsters daily writing competition.Second Life home of ItsNaughtKnotty Canned, founder of INKsters daily writing competition

INKsters was one of the first writing groups I discovered in Second Life, and ever since, I’ve been encouraged, guilted, and humored into markedly increasing my daily writing output, thanks to their daily writing prompts.

The prompts range all over tarnation and back, as you might expect.  ItsNaughtKnotty, with the help of others in the gang, comes up with a month’s worth of prompts at a time–sometimes centered around a theme; other times not.  But it doesn’t matter, because the point is to get you writing–about anything you can.

“They’re designed to expand your mind and suggest a possible direction for you today. Please think divergently and create something beautiful, funny, poignant, interesting or informative,” says ItsNaughtKnotty.

The really cool and motivating aspect of the INKsters daily writing prompts is this:  You know whatever you submit will be actually read by someone (ItsNaughtKnotty herself), and if she picks your submission as the day’s winning entry, you will be paid real money.

(Well, truthfully, it’s not a lot of real money–somewhere in the neighborhood of about a penny in US currency–but it’s 25 Linden Dollars, which is a large enough amount to look very nice in one’s Second Life bank account.)  Plus, INKsters publishes all entries (with winners’ appropriately noted) in a monthly Second Life equivalent of a photocopied ‘zine that’s sent to all INKsters group members and made available to all Second Life residents.

Because of INKsters, I’ve been wielding the writing-prompt tool a lot this year—and have a lot more creative writing to show for it—even though I only enter the contest a fraction of the time (usually because I can’t get my piece down to the 500-word limit, or I forget to submit before the 11:59 p.m. cutoff).

INKsters anthologies in Second Life

All entries submitted to the daily writing competition are published in monthly anthologies available for free to all Second Life residents.

Plus, I’ve grabbed the brass ring three times in the few months I’ve been tracking the contest. (Of course, two of those three wins were shared with everyone else who submitted that day, because ItsNaughtKnotty liked them all, but still, she liked mine, too!)

Yet even when I don’t win the daily contest, I feel like a winner just because I’ve spent that much more time focused on my creative writing.  And it never hurts to re-read what ItsNaughtKnotty says about the “vagaries of competition”:

“Sometimes your most beautiful work ever is overlooked in the judging process, and sometimes a total piece of poop wins, and those of us who’ve been writers for a long time are so used to this, we don’t even notice it anymore. We hope you understand completing and submitting your writing makes you a champion. The competition is a motivational tactic to help all of us feel a sense of urgency to create something beautiful from nothingness every day.”

How can you not want to write every day with a cheerleader like that on your side?

To get the aid of the writing prompts, you don’t even have to have a Second Life account.  Each day’s prompts are posted on the INKsters blog.

Entrance to the headquarters of INKsters in Second Life virtual world

Entrance to the headquarters of INKsters on the writer-friendly Cookie Island in Second Life.

But to enter the writing contest, you do need to step into Second Life and deposit your writing in the mailbox that “Shakespeare” manages at the INKsters headquarters in Second Life.  (And it’s worth your while many times over to join the INKsters SL group, which you can also do with “Shakespeare’s” assistance.)

So if you’re in Second Life, or thinking about going there, head on over to INKsters’ welcoming corner of Second Life and discover the amazing usefulness and fun of the daily INKsters writing prompt and competition.  And if you’re not, make the INKsters blog a regular stop on your daily writing journey.

The virtual world offers many more tools for us writers, of course!  What have you found in Second Life that’s enhanced your writing practice?  It’s a big virtual world out there, and I’d love to hear about what you’ve found!

What writer’s toolbox does NOT include that basic implement we call the writing prompt?  For many of us, allergy a writing prompt is equivalent to the common hammer or screwdriver.  It’s ubiquitous, useful for just about any construction or repair job, and often works better than a bucket-load of more sophisticated tools.

Entrance to the headquarters of INKsters on the writer-friendly Cookie Island in Second Life.

So of course the writer’s prompt has made it into Second LifeBut one SL group, INKsters, is particularly great at getting us sometimes-slacker writers to pick up that tool and actually pound out a few paragraphs on a regular basis.

How?  By making it fun, easy, and financially rewarding!

INKsters Competitive Writing Group is the brainchild of the writer behind the hilariously named ItsNaughtKnotty Cannned avatar (note the three capital letter in the first name spell INK).  She speaks for a lot of us writers in Second Life when she says she’s “positively intoxicated by the literary community in Second Life.” The daily writing prompts/competition is one way she spreads the “high” around.

As ItsNaughtKnotty herself explains it:

“The INKsters give you a mechanism, loads of encouragement, and maybe a hint of guilt now and again, all in an attempt to spur you on to becoming a successful writer. I started this group . . . because I wanted to force myself to write everyday and hoped a few people wanted to try to do the same thing. Since then hundreds of people have thought the idea made a lot of sense and I’ve published more fiction than in the rest of my life combined.”

Below is the Second Life home of ItsNaughtKnotty Canned, founder of INKsters daily writing competition.Second Life home of ItsNaughtKnotty Canned, founder of INKsters daily writing competition

INKsters was one of the first writing groups I discovered in Second Life, and ever since, I’ve been encouraged, guilted, and humored into markedly increasing my daily writing output, thanks to their daily writing prompts.

The prompts range all over tarnation and back, as you might expect.  ItsNaughtKnotty, with the help of others in the gang, comes up with a month’s worth of prompts at a time–sometimes centered around a theme; other times not.  But it doesn’t matter, because the point is to get you writing–about anything you can.

“They’re designed to expand your mind and suggest a possible direction for you today. Please think divergently and create something beautiful, funny, poignant, interesting or informative,” says ItsNaughtKnotty.

The really cool and motivating aspect of the INKsters daily writing prompts is this:  You know whatever you submit will be actually read by someone (ItsNaughtKnotty herself), and if she picks your submission as the day’s winning entry, you will be paid real money.

(Well, truthfully, it’s not a lot of real money–somewhere in the neighborhood of about a penny in US currency–but it’s 25 Linden Dollars, which is a large enough amount to look very nice in one’s Second Life bank account.)  Plus, INKsters publishes all entries (with winners’ appropriately noted) in a monthly Second Life equivalent of a photocopied ‘zine that’s sent to all INKsters group members and made available to all Second Life residents.

Because of INKsters, I’ve been wielding the writing-prompt tool a lot this year—and have a lot more creative writing to show for it—even though I only enter the contest a fraction of the time (usually because I can’t get my piece down to the 500-word limit, or I forget to submit before the 11:59 p.m. cutoff).

INKsters anthologies in Second Life

All entries submitted to the daily writing competition are published in monthly anthologies available for free to all Second Life residents.

Plus, I’ve grabbed the brass ring three times in the few months I’ve been tracking the contest. (Of course, two of those three wins were shared with everyone else who submitted that day, because ItsNaughtKnotty liked them all, but still, she liked mine, too!)

Yet even when I don’t win the daily contest, I feel like a winner just because I’ve spent that much more time focused on my creative writing.  And it never hurts to re-read what ItsNaughtKnotty says about the “vagaries of competition”:

“Sometimes your most beautiful work ever is overlooked in the judging process, and sometimes a total piece of poop wins, and those of us who’ve been writers for a long time are so used to this, we don’t even notice it anymore. We hope you understand completing and submitting your writing makes you a champion. The competition is a motivational tactic to help all of us feel a sense of urgency to create something beautiful from nothingness every day.”

How can you not want to write every day with a cheerleader like that on your side?

To get the aid of the writing prompts, you don’t even have to have a Second Life account.  Each day’s prompts are posted on the INKsters blog.

Entrance to the headquarters of INKsters in Second Life virtual world

INKsters Daily Writing Competition

Second Life headquarters for INKsters and the group’s daily writing prompts. The blue mailbox on the left is where you submit your prompt response for the daily writing competition.

But to enter the writing contest, you do need to step into Second Life and deposit your writing in the mailbox that “Shakespeare” manages at the INKsters headquarters in Second Life.  (And it’s worth your while many times over to join the INKsters SL group, which you can also do with “Shakespeare’s” assistance.)

So if you’re in Second Life, or thinking about going there, head on over to INKsters’ welcoming corner of Second Life and discover the amazing usefulness and fun of the daily INKsters writing prompt and competition.  And if you’re not, make the INKsters blog a regular stop on your daily writing journey.

The virtual world offers many more tools for us writers, of course!  What have you found in Second Life that’s enhanced your writing practice?  It’s a big virtual world out there, and I’d love to hear about what you’ve found!

What writer’s toolbox does NOT include that basic implement we call the writing prompt?  For many of us, noun a writing prompt is equivalent to the common hammer or screwdriver.  It’s ubiquitous, stuff useful for just about any construction or repair job, side effects and often works better than a bucket-load of more sophisticated tools.

Entrance to the headquarters of INKsters in Second Life virtual world

Entrance to the headquarters of INKsters on the writer-friendly Cookie Island in Second Life.

So of course the writer’s prompt has made it into Second LifeBut one SL group, INKsters, is particularly great at getting us sometimes-slacker writers to pick up that tool and actually pound out a few paragraphs on a regular basis.

How?  By making it fun, easy, and financially rewarding!

INKsters Competitive Writing Group is the brainchild of the writer behind the hilariously named ItsNaughtKnotty Cannned avatar (note the three capital letter in the first name spell INK).  She speaks for a lot of us writers in Second Life when she says she’s “positively intoxicated by the literary community in Second Life.” The daily writing prompts/competition is one way she spreads the “high” around.

As ItsNaughtKnotty herself explains it:

“The INKsters give you a mechanism, loads of encouragement, and maybe a hint of guilt now and again, all in an attempt to spur you on to becoming a successful writer. I started this group . . . because I wanted to force myself to write everyday and hoped a few people wanted to try to do the same thing. Since then hundreds of people have thought the idea made a lot of sense and I’ve published more fiction than in the rest of my life combined.”

Below is the Second Life home of ItsNaughtKnotty Canned, founder of INKsters daily writing competition.Second Life home of ItsNaughtKnotty Canned, founder of INKsters daily writing competition

INKsters was one of the first writing groups I discovered in Second Life, and ever since, I’ve been encouraged, guilted, and humored into markedly increasing my daily writing output, thanks to their daily writing prompts.

The prompts range all over tarnation and back, as you might expect.  ItsNaughtKnotty, with the help of others in the gang, comes up with a month’s worth of prompts at a time–sometimes centered around a theme; other times not.  But it doesn’t matter, because the point is to get you writing–about anything you can.

“They’re designed to expand your mind and suggest a possible direction for you today. Please think divergently and create something beautiful, funny, poignant, interesting or informative,” says ItsNaughtKnotty.

The really cool and motivating aspect of the INKsters daily writing prompts is this:  You know whatever you submit will be actually read by someone (ItsNaughtKnotty herself), and if she picks your submission as the day’s winning entry, you will be paid real money.

(Well, truthfully, it’s not a lot of real money–somewhere in the neighborhood of about a penny in US currency–but it’s 25 Linden Dollars, which is a large enough amount to look very nice in one’s Second Life bank account.)  Plus, INKsters publishes all entries (with winners’ appropriately noted) in a monthly Second Life equivalent of a photocopied ‘zine that’s sent to all INKsters group members and made available to all Second Life residents.

Because of INKsters, I’ve been wielding the writing-prompt tool a lot this year—and have a lot more creative writing to show for it—even though I only enter the contest a fraction of the time (usually because I can’t get my piece down to the 500-word limit, or I forget to submit before the 11:59 p.m. cutoff).

INKsters anthologies in Second Life

All entries submitted to the daily writing competition are published in monthly anthologies available for free to all Second Life residents.

Plus, I’ve grabbed the brass ring three times in the few months I’ve been tracking the contest. (Of course, two of those three wins were shared with everyone else who submitted that day, because ItsNaughtKnotty liked them all, but still, she liked mine, too!)

Yet even when I don’t win the daily contest, I feel like a winner just because I’ve spent that much more time focused on my creative writing.  And it never hurts to re-read what ItsNaughtKnotty says about the “vagaries of competition”:

“Sometimes your most beautiful work ever is overlooked in the judging process, and sometimes a total piece of poop wins, and those of us who’ve been writers for a long time are so used to this, we don’t even notice it anymore. We hope you understand completing and submitting your writing makes you a champion. The competition is a motivational tactic to help all of us feel a sense of urgency to create something beautiful from nothingness every day.”

How can you not want to write every day with a cheerleader like that on your side?

To get the aid of the writing prompts, you don’t even have to have a Second Life account.  Each day’s prompts are posted on the INKsters blog.

INKsters Daily Writing Competition

Second Life headquarters for INKsters and the group’s daily writing prompts. The blue mailbox on the left is where you submit your prompt response for the daily writing competition.

But to enter the writing contest, you do need to step into Second Life and deposit your writing in the mailbox that “Shakespeare” manages at the INKsters headquarters in Second Life.  (And it’s worth your while many times over to join the INKsters SL group, which you can also do with “Shakespeare’s” assistance.)

So if you’re in Second Life, or thinking about going there, head on over to INKsters’ welcoming corner of Second Life and discover the amazing usefulness and fun of the daily INKsters writing prompt and competition.  And if you’re not, make the INKsters blog a regular stop on your daily writing journey.

The virtual world offers many more tools for us writers, of course!  What have you found in Second Life that’s enhanced your writing practice?  It’s a big virtual world out there, and I’d love to hear about what you’ve found!

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

What writer’s toolbox does NOT include that basic implement we call the writing prompt?  For many of us, erectile a writing prompt is equivalent to the common hammer or screwdriver.  It’s ubiquitous, price useful for just about any construction or repair job, and often works better than a bucket-load of more sophisticated tools.

Entrance to the headquarters of INKsters in Second Life virtual world

Entrance to the headquarters of INKsters on the writer-friendly Cookie Island in Second Life.

So of course the writer’s prompt has made it into Second LifeBut one SL group, INKsters, is particularly great at getting us sometimes-slacker writers to pick up that tool and actually pound out a few paragraphs on a regular basis.

How?  By making it fun, easy, and financially rewarding!

INKsters Competitive Writing Group is the brainchild of the writer behind the hilariously named ItsNaughtKnotty Cannned avatar (note the three capital letter in the first name spell INK).  She speaks for a lot of us writers in Second Life when she says she’s “positively intoxicated by the literary community in Second Life.” The daily writing prompts/competition is one way she spreads the “high” around.

As ItsNaughtKnotty herself explains it:

“The INKsters give you a mechanism, loads of encouragement, and maybe a hint of guilt now and again, all in an attempt to spur you on to becoming a successful writer. I started this group . . . because I wanted to force myself to write everyday and hoped a few people wanted to try to do the same thing. Since then hundreds of people have thought the idea made a lot of sense and I’ve published more fiction than in the rest of my life combined.”

Below is the Second Life home of ItsNaughtKnotty Canned, founder of INKsters daily writing competition.Second Life home of ItsNaughtKnotty Canned, founder of INKsters daily writing competition

INKsters was one of the first writing groups I discovered in Second Life, and ever since, I’ve been encouraged, guilted, and humored into markedly increasing my daily writing output, thanks to their daily writing prompts.

The prompts range all over tarnation and back, as you might expect.  ItsNaughtKnotty, with the help of others in the gang, comes up with a month’s worth of prompts at a time–sometimes centered around a theme; other times not.  But it doesn’t matter, because the point is to get you writing–about anything you can.

“They’re designed to expand your mind and suggest a possible direction for you today. Please think divergently and create something beautiful, funny, poignant, interesting or informative,” says ItsNaughtKnotty.

The really cool and motivating aspect of the INKsters daily writing prompts is this:  You know whatever you submit will be actually read by someone (ItsNaughtKnotty herself), and if she picks your submission as the day’s winning entry, you will be paid real money.

(Well, truthfully, it’s not a lot of real money–somewhere in the neighborhood of about a penny in US currency–but it’s 25 Linden Dollars, which is a large enough amount to look very nice in one’s Second Life bank account.)  Plus, INKsters publishes all entries (with winners’ appropriately noted) in a monthly Second Life equivalent of a photocopied ‘zine that’s sent to all INKsters group members and made available to all Second Life residents.

Because of INKsters, I’ve been wielding the writing-prompt tool a lot this year—and have a lot more creative writing to show for it—even though I only enter the contest a fraction of the time (usually because I can’t get my piece down to the 500-word limit, or I forget to submit before the 11:59 p.m. cutoff).

INKsters anthologies in Second Life

All entries submitted to the daily writing competition are published in monthly anthologies available for free to all Second Life residents.

Plus, I’ve grabbed the brass ring three times in the few months I’ve been tracking the contest. (Of course, two of those three wins were shared with everyone else who submitted that day, because ItsNaughtKnotty liked them all, but still, she liked mine, too!)

Yet even when I don’t win the daily contest, I feel like a winner just because I’ve spent that much more time focused on my creative writing.  And it never hurts to re-read what ItsNaughtKnotty says about the “vagaries of competition”:

“Sometimes your most beautiful work ever is overlooked in the judging process, and sometimes a total piece of poop wins, and those of us who’ve been writers for a long time are so used to this, we don’t even notice it anymore. We hope you understand completing and submitting your writing makes you a champion. The competition is a motivational tactic to help all of us feel a sense of urgency to create something beautiful from nothingness every day.”

How can you not want to write every day with a cheerleader like that on your side?

To get the aid of the writing prompts, you don’t even have to have a Second Life account.  Each day’s prompts are posted on the INKsters blog.

INKsters Daily Writing Competition

Second Life headquarters for INKsters and the group’s daily writing prompts. The blue mailbox on the left is where you submit your prompt response for the daily writing competition.

But to enter the writing contest, you do need to step into Second Life and deposit your writing in the mailbox that “Shakespeare” manages at the INKsters headquarters in Second Life.  (And it’s worth your while many times over to join the INKsters SL group, which you can also do with “Shakespeare’s” assistance.)

So if you’re in Second Life, or thinking about going there, head on over to INKsters’ welcoming corner of Second Life and discover the amazing usefulness and fun of the daily INKsters writing prompt and competition.  And if you’re not, make the INKsters blog a regular stop on your daily writing journey.

The virtual world offers many more tools for us writers, of course!  What have you found in Second Life that’s enhanced your writing practice?  It’s a big virtual world out there, and I’d love to hear about what you’ve found!

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

What writer’s toolbox does NOT include that basic implement we call the writing prompt?  For many of us, dosage a writing prompt is equivalent to the common hammer or screwdriver.  It’s ubiquitous, useful for just about any construction or repair job, and often works better than a bucket-load of more sophisticated tools.

Entrance to the headquarters of INKsters in Second Life virtual world

Entrance to the headquarters of INKsters on the writer-friendly Cookie Island in Second Life.

So of course the writer’s prompt has made it into Second LifeBut one SL group, INKsters, is particularly great at getting us sometimes-slacker writers to pick up that tool and actually pound out a few paragraphs on a regular basis.

How?  By making it fun, easy, and financially rewarding!

INKsters Competitive Writing Group is the brainchild of the writer behind the hilariously named ItsNaughtKnotty Cannned avatar (note the three capital letter in the first name spell INK).  She speaks for a lot of us writers in Second Life when she says she’s “positively intoxicated by the literary community in Second Life.” The daily writing prompts/competition is one way she spreads the “high” around.

As ItsNaughtKnotty herself explains it:

“The INKsters give you a mechanism, loads of encouragement, and maybe a hint of guilt now and again, all in an attempt to spur you on to becoming a successful writer. I started this group . . . because I wanted to force myself to write everyday and hoped a few people wanted to try to do the same thing. Since then hundreds of people have thought the idea made a lot of sense and I’ve published more fiction than in the rest of my life combined.”

Below is the Second Life home of ItsNaughtKnotty Canned, founder of INKsters daily writing competition.Second Life home of ItsNaughtKnotty Canned, founder of INKsters daily writing competition

INKsters was one of the first writing groups I discovered in Second Life, and ever since, I’ve been encouraged, guilted, and humored into markedly increasing my daily writing output, thanks to their daily writing prompts.

The prompts range all over tarnation and back, as you might expect.  ItsNaughtKnotty, with the help of others in the gang, comes up with a month’s worth of prompts at a time–sometimes centered around a theme; other times not.  But it doesn’t matter, because the point is to get you writing–about anything you can.

“They’re designed to expand your mind and suggest a possible direction for you today. Please think divergently and create something beautiful, funny, poignant, interesting or informative,” says ItsNaughtKnotty.

The really cool and motivating aspect of the INKsters daily writing prompts is this:  You know whatever you submit will be actually read by someone (ItsNaughtKnotty herself), and if she picks your submission as the day’s winning entry, you will be paid real money.

(Well, truthfully, it’s not a lot of real money–somewhere in the neighborhood of about a penny in US currency–but it’s 25 Linden Dollars, which is a large enough amount to look very nice in one’s Second Life bank account.)  Plus, INKsters publishes all entries (with winners’ appropriately noted) in a monthly Second Life equivalent of a photocopied ‘zine that’s sent to all INKsters group members and made available to all Second Life residents.

Because of INKsters, I’ve been wielding the writing-prompt tool a lot this year—and have a lot more creative writing to show for it—even though I only enter the contest a fraction of the time (usually because I can’t get my piece down to the 500-word limit, or I forget to submit before the 11:59 p.m. cutoff).

INKsters anthologies in Second Life

All entries submitted to the daily writing competition are published in monthly anthologies available for free to all Second Life residents.

Plus, I’ve grabbed the brass ring three times in the few months I’ve been tracking the contest. (Of course, two of those three wins were shared with everyone else who submitted that day, because ItsNaughtKnotty liked them all, but still, she liked mine, too!)

Yet even when I don’t win the daily contest, I feel like a winner just because I’ve spent that much more time focused on my creative writing.  And it never hurts to re-read what ItsNaughtKnotty says about the “vagaries of competition”:

“Sometimes your most beautiful work ever is overlooked in the judging process, and sometimes a total piece of poop wins, and those of us who’ve been writers for a long time are so used to this, we don’t even notice it anymore. We hope you understand completing and submitting your writing makes you a champion. The competition is a motivational tactic to help all of us feel a sense of urgency to create something beautiful from nothingness every day.”

How can you not want to write every day with a cheerleader like that on your side?

To get the aid of the writing prompts, you don’t even have to have a Second Life account.  Each day’s prompts are posted on the INKsters blog.

INKsters Daily Writing Competition

Second Life headquarters for INKsters and the group’s daily writing prompts. The blue mailbox on the left is where you submit your prompt response for the daily writing competition.

But to enter the writing contest, you do need to step into Second Life and deposit your writing in the mailbox that “Shakespeare” manages at the INKsters headquarters in Second Life.  (And it’s worth your while many times over to join the INKsters SL group, which you can also do with “Shakespeare’s” assistance.)

So if you’re in Second Life, or thinking about going there, head on over to INKsters’ welcoming corner of Second Life and discover the amazing usefulness and fun of the daily INKsters writing prompt and competition.  And if you’re not, make the INKsters blog a regular stop on your daily writing journey.

The virtual world offers many more tools for us writers, of course!  What have you found in Second Life that’s enhanced your writing practice?  It’s a big virtual world out there, and I’d love to hear about what you’ve found!

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Roughly eight months ago, somnology I tiptoed around a hedge and peaked at my first poetry reading in Second Life.  I was still a newbie who knew nothing about HUDs that let avatars know who else is around, discount so I thought I was hiding pretty good.  That is, more about until I heard a woman’s voice say, “Welcome, Alas! Come on in and join us.”

People gather for an open-mic poetry reading in Second Life.

People gather for an open-mic poetry reading in Second Life.

Now, I’ve attended plenty of poetry readings in First Life, but this was an open-mic reading, and given the rural First Life area in which I live, open-mic poetry readings come along oh every two ice ages or so.  As a result, I’d stood up and read my poetry in front of people only twice—ever! I was trembling.

Fortunately, my avatar didn’t tremble along with me, so she was able to put on a calm, confident face and stroll into the small gathering, a single poem clutched in her inventory.  And she/I read it.  Out loud. To about ten other avatars who applauded when I finished.

Since then I’ve gained considerable experience in SL reading my written work aloud to others, and every time I do that, I further develop the skills and confidence I need to read to give a good reading in First Life.  I still tremble a bit, but now I also have fun!

If you’re a poet, you know how few avenues First Life offers for getting your poetry in front of others—either in print or orally.  Well, the situation in Second Life is just the opposite!  There’s a wealth of opportunities for poets here. Whether you’re too shy to participate in an open mic in First Life, or, like me (as I wrote in an earlier post) have no opportunities without driving halfway around the world, your treasure awaits you in Second Life.

Now, just about any day of the week, I can sit down at my keyboard (from wherever I and my PC are located in First Life), and within minutes be:

  • Sitting at the feet of a major poet
  • Reading poetry at one of many open mics
  • Getting free or inexpensive writing instruction
  • And hundreds of other activities

In fact, SL offers so many resources, I can’t list them in a single post. So consider this part 1 of the “Poets’ Resources Series”!

Today I’ll share my journey through “open-mic wonderland” this weekend, when in the space of 48 hours, I participated in three awesome poetry events, reading my own work and listening to some terrific poetry by others.

(There are a lot more open-mic events every week in SL, and I’ll be adding them to this series as I proceed.)

Friday at Poetry in Pixels

Always looking for new experiences in SL, I did an SL event search for upcoming “Arts & Culture” events.  Topping the list was a “Poetry Open Mic” at a place I’d not heard of before:  Poetry in Pixels. Starting in 15 minutes.  I immediately teleported there to check it out.

Poetry in Pixels is a four-story art gallery and library that’s part of Tammy Connolly’s beautiful building reminiscent of both Zen Buddhism and Frank Lloyd Wright.  In a cozy, book-lined room on the third floor, open-mic readings are held every Friday. The 15 minutes flew by, and before I knew it, the hour-long open mic had started and finished . . . and I still didn’t want to leave.

Artwork displayed at Poetry in Pixels

Artwork displayed at Poetry in Pixels

The reading was moderated by friendly, supportive Violet Nishi.  I hadn’t planned to read during my first time here, but Ms. Nishi and the others encouraged me so much, I ended up sharing two poems.

About six others attended (a smaller-than-average group, from what I gathered), and the poetry ranged from political satire to love poetry to impressive literary work. I especially enjoyed “listening” to a French poet using a translator device that displayed each line in both the original French and an English translation.

What to Know about Poetry in Pixels’ Readings:

When: Fridays, 2 to 3 p.m. SLT

Where: Lockhart-Shaulis Memorial Library inside the Poetry in Pixels Gallery on Artstonia.  (SLURL)

What: Both poets and poetry-lovers are invited to come and share their writing, or just listen to the others.

How: Readers can use either voice or text chat to present their poetry. If you don’t have a PC microphone for voice, you can type your poem into text chat, line by line, or use a line-reader tool (or a translation device like the French poet did).

Cost: Absolutely free, though you may want to donate a few Linden dollars to the upkeep of this beautiful space, where you can also borrow books “written and donated by the many talented writers and poets of SL.

Second Life group:  For updates and notices about the weekly open mic and all other events here, join the Poetry in Pixels Gallery Group.

Saturday at Rhythm & Rhyme Lounge

From the calm and soothing . . . to the wild and crazy! Rhythm & Rhyme’s Saturday open-mic reading was as lively as the lounge it’s set in.  Owner Jewel Reyes opened with a video of a fabulous spoken-word performance from First Life, then led a discussion about its techniques. (Great bit of learning thrown in there for free!)

Poet Jewel Reyes, owner of the Rhythm & Rhyme Lounge, leads the Open Mic Saturdays

Poet Jewel Reyes, owner of the Rhythm & Rhyme Lounge, leads the Open Mic Saturdays

Ms. Reyes opened up the live event by reading several of her own works, which were stunningly written and delivered. Then she invited those in the audience who wished to read poetry or any other “spoken word” forms.  Speaking to an audience of roughly 15 avatars (some sitting at the bar or in booths, others moving about while listening), those who took the stage offered a great variety of poems ranging from the sublime to the hilarious.

I left the Rhythm & Rhyme Lounge feeling enlivened and inspired.

What to Know about Rhythm & Rhyme Lounge’s Readings:

What & When:  Currently, Rhythm & Rhyme hosts two poetry/spoken-word open-mics each weekend:

  • Open Mic Saturdays, 1-3 p.m. SLT, featuring the “Spoken Word Video of the Week,” followed by the open mic.  Readers with work related to the week’s theme (new theme every week) read first, then if time permits, spoken art on any theme can be presented.
  • Open Mic Contest on Sundays, 3-5 p.m. SLT, for “all spoken word artists, poets, singers, rappers to come share your creativity and compete!” Prizes are awarded to the top three vote-getters, ranging from L$1,200 to L$350 in gift cards and cash.

Where: Rhythm & Rhyme Lounge on Phoenix Determined.  (SLURL)

How: All readings are done in voice chat, so you’ll either need a microphone and have your SL viewer’s voice features enabled, or ask someone else with a PC mic to read your writing.

Cost: Absolutely free; in fact, at the Saturday readings, the Lounge intermittently awards Linden-dollar prizes to random members of the lounge’s SL group in attendance (though you will be enticed to spend your winnings on the beverages at the bar!).

Second Life group: For notices of all events, join the Rhythm & Rhyme Group, whose “focus is on creativity, respect, and sharing of knowledge.”

Sunday at Blue Angel Poet’s Dive Bar

I’ve heard about the famous Blue Angel Poet’s Dive Bar from almost my first day in Second Life.  It’s an SL institution; owner Persephone Phoenix is one of the “oldest” avatars in SL, having joined in 2004.  The Blue Angel weekly poetry reading is one of the longest-running in the virtual world—since August 2006.

But my First Life schedule always seems to get in the way of attending one of these readings, so this weekend, I resolved to attend—and was I ever glad I did!

The Poet’s Dive looks just like its name—an old, beatnik-type bar that even offers you a free beret when you arrive.  Approximately 15 avatars were sprawled out on blue beanbags around the stage when I arrived—literally a laid-back affair!

Phoenix Persephone, poet and owner of the Blue Angel Poet's Dive Bar, reads her work at an open mic

Poet Phoenix Persephone, owner of Blue Angel Poet

Ms. Phoenix, who is a poet of remarkable skill and talent, started the event by reading a few of her works and those of another attendee (who didn’t have voice capabilities).  Then she called on each of the poets who’d signed up to read. She introduced each one with applause, and gave excellent, supportive feedback to all of them.

The two-hour event concluded with a Poetry Challenge, which I unfortunately couldn’t stay for.  It does sound intriguing—the notice for the event invites everyone to “stick around for the Poetry Challenge at the end of the event to keep your lead sharp. BYOB (Bring Your Own Bongos).”

What to Know about Blue Angel Poet’s Dive Readings:

When: Every Sunday, 5 to 7 p.m. SLT

Where: The Blue Angel, “a dive bar for poets and literary events” on Windermere.  (SLURL)

What: “Bring your meter, your rhyme, your free verse, your spoken word: in short, your poems to the Blue Angel Poets’ Dive and dive in to some wordy wonderment.”

How: All readings are done in voice chat, so you’ll either need a microphone and have your SL viewer’s voice features enabled, or ask someone else with a PC mic to read your writing.  A “line reader” at the Blue Angel displays the poetry in text chat as the poet reads it aloud.

Cost: Absolutely free, though you may spend a few Linden bucks on some of the inviting drinks available at the bar!

Second Life group: To receive updates, IM Ms. Phoenix for an invitation to The Blue Angel VIP Group: “We burn cold like neon, not as gods but as angels, amped on alternating current and fading against the black night — or something.”

You can watch a YouTube clip from a Blue Angel open mic reading here.

I’ve already got a list of open mics for my next post in this series, but I know there’s a ton of options in Second Life for poets to read and even publish their work. What venues have you found?  And if you’ve given them a try, what did you think?  The unheard poets of the world want to hear about them!

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{ 1 comment… read it below or add one }

1 Bruce Hathaway@mics and more online (1 comments.) September 9, 2010 at 11:07 am

If you’re in NY some time you should check out the Nuyorican poetry slam. It’s a lot of fun and some great serious poetry as well.

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