About Me

It’s the virtual writing world squared: the mostly virtual National Novel Writing Month extravaganza, pharm
coupled with the totally virtual Second Life NaNoWriMo writers!

As NaNoWriMo winds down, decease
hundreds of thousands of words have risen counters at the NaNoWriMo website and at writers’ gatherings throughout SL.

11-23-10_gypsy-camp I’m one of the slackers, unfortunately.  I’m not going to get even halfway to the 50,000 words written in November that entitles you to claim yourself a “winner” of the NaNoWriMo sprint. But that doesn’t matter, because I’ve been too busy this month sending agents queries, partials, and even a full manuscript of the novel I gave birth to in the 2008 NaNoWriMo.

Still, I’ve joined in several times on the NaNo “write-ins” at the lovely Milk Wood writing community in Second Life, and have spent time at my own writing area at Story Mountain Center for Writers, my home place in SL.  And even though I’ve written very few words of my next novel, I’ve loved the writers’ energy I tap into whenever I do go “inworld” to write.

As I’ve said before, Second Life offers a great NaNo writing community, spread over several locations where writers hang out.  Some of the highlights of this year’s NaNo month in SL:

  • At least six Second Life groups have formed for the sole purpose of writers supporting each other during “WriMo.”
  • The fabulous Kghia Gherardi has hosted write-ins every Monday night at Bookstacks Pub.
  • Harriet Gausman’s Milk Wood writing center has had nearly daily events at their “Gypsy Camp”:  write-ins, “word wars,” and writing dashes to spur writers on to that 50K-word mark.
  • The Written Word group in SL has had at least weekly activities at their “camp” at the London School of Journalism Woodlands to bring writers together for “the quietest event on SL, apart from meditation,” as the group’s leader Jilly Kidd put it.

Just about every writers’ community, center, cafe, and pub in SL offers space to WriMos to come and write.

11-23-10_LSJ

If you haven’t started on those 50,000 words, it’s probably too late to try to get there before midnight December 1, but it’s not too late to log in and get the experience of a virtual write-in. And the best part is that the writers and supporting organizations go full-force all year round!

Are you NaNo-ing this year?  How are you doing and where do you get your best support and motivation? In Second Life?  On the NaNo website?  Another virtual world?  Or the so-called “real world”?  Post a comment and share!

It’s the virtual writing world squared: the mostly virtual National Novel Writing Month extravaganza, try
coupled with the totally virtual Second Life NaNoWriMo writers!

As NaNoWriMo winds down, hundreds of thousands of words have risen counters at the NaNoWriMo website and at writers’ gatherings throughout SL.

11-23-10_gypsy-camp I’m one of the slackers, unfortunately.  I’m not going to get even halfway to the 50,000 words written in November that entitles you to claim yourself a “winner” of the NaNoWriMo sprint. But that doesn’t matter, because I’ve been too busy this month sending agents queries, partials, and even a full manuscript of the novel I gave birth to in the 2008 NaNoWriMo.

Still, I’ve joined in several times on the NaNo “write-ins” at the lovely Milk Wood writing community in Second Life, and have spent time at my own writing area at Story Mountain Center for Writers, my home place in SL.  And even though I’ve written very few words of my next novel, I’ve loved the writers’ energy I tap into whenever I do go “inworld” to write.

As I’ve said before, Second Life offers a great NaNo writing community, spread over several locations where writers hang out.  Some of the highlights of this year’s NaNo month in SL:

  • At least six Second Life groups have formed for the sole purpose of writers supporting each other during “WriMo.”
  • The fabulous Kghia Gherardi has hosted write-ins every Monday night at Bookstacks Pub.
  • Harriet Gausman’s Milk Wood writing center has had nearly daily events at their “Gypsy Camp”:  write-ins, “word wars,” and writing dashes to spur writers on to that 50K-word mark.
  • The Written Word group in SL has had at least weekly activities at their “camp” at the London School of Journalism Woodlands to bring writers together for “the quietest event on SL, apart from meditation,” as the group’s leader Jilly Kidd put it.

Just about every writers’ community, center, cafe, and pub in SL offers space to WriMos to come and write.

11-23-10_LSJ

If you haven’t started on those 50,000 words, it’s probably too late to try to get there before midnight December 1, but it’s not too late to log in and get the experience of a virtual write-in. And the best part is that the writers and supporting organizations go full-force all year round!

Are you NaNo-ing this year?  How are you doing and where do you get your best support and motivation? In Second Life?  On the NaNo website?  Another virtual world?  Or the so-called “real world”?  Post a comment and share!

It’s the virtual writing world squared: the mostly virtual National Novel Writing Month extravaganza, viagra buy
coupled with the totally virtual Second Life NaNoWriMo writers!

As NaNoWriMo winds down, drugs
hundreds of thousands of words have risen counters at the NaNoWriMo website and at writers’ gatherings throughout SL (including the Milk Wood Gypsy Camp for writers, pharm
shown in the photo below).

11-23-10_gypsy-camp I’m one of the slackers, unfortunately.  I’m not going to get even halfway to the 50,000 words written in November that entitles you to claim yourself a “winner” of the NaNoWriMo sprint. But that doesn’t matter, because I’ve been too busy this month sending agents queries, partials, and even a full manuscript of the novel I gave birth to in the 2008 NaNoWriMo.

Still, I’ve joined in several times on the NaNo “write-ins” at the lovely Milk Wood writing community in Second Life, and have spent time at my own writing area at Story Mountain Center for Writers, my home place in SL.  And even though I’ve written very few words of my next novel, I’ve loved the writers’ energy I tap into whenever I do go “inworld” to write.

As I’ve said before, Second Life offers a great NaNo writing community, spread over several locations where writers hang out.  Some of the highlights of this year’s NaNo month in SL:

  • At least six Second Life groups have formed for the sole purpose of writers supporting each other during “WriMo.”
  • The fabulous Kghia Gherardi has hosted write-ins every Monday night at Bookstacks Pub.
  • Harriet Gausman’s Milk Wood writing center has had nearly daily events at their “Gypsy Camp”:  write-ins, “word wars,” and writing dashes to spur writers on to that 50K-word mark.
  • The Written Word group in SL has had at least weekly activities at their “camp” at the London School of Journalism Woodlands to bring writers together for “the quietest event on SL, apart from meditation,” as the group’s leader Jilly Kidd put it.

Just about every writers’ community, center, cafe, and pub in SL offers space to WriMos to come and write.

11-23-10_LSJ

If you haven’t started on those 50,000 words, it’s probably too late to try to get there before midnight December 1, but it’s not too late to log in and get the experience of a virtual write-in. And the best part is that the writers and supporting organizations go full-force all year round!

Are you NaNo-ing this year?  How are you doing and where do you get your best support and motivation? In Second Life?  On the NaNo website?  Another virtual world?  Or the so-called “real world”?  Post a comment and share!

It’s the virtual writing world squared: the mostly virtual National Novel Writing Month extravaganza, view coupled with the totally virtual Second Life NaNoWriMo writers!

As NaNoWriMo winds down, generic
hundreds of thousands of words have risen counters at the NaNoWriMo website and at writers’ gatherings throughout SL (including the Milk Wood Gypsy Camp for writers, shown in the photo below).

11-23-10_gypsy-camp I’m one of the slackers, unfortunately.  I’m not going to get even halfway to the 50,000 words written in November that entitles you to claim yourself a “winner” of the NaNoWriMo sprint. But that doesn’t matter, because I’ve been too busy this month sending agents queries, partials, and even a full manuscript of the novel I gave birth to in the 2008 NaNoWriMo.

Still, I’ve joined in several times on the NaNo “write-ins” at the lovely Milk Wood writing community in Second Life, and have spent time at my own writing area at Story Mountain Center for Writers, my home place in SL.  And even though I’ve written very few words of my next novel, I’ve loved the writers’ energy I tap into whenever I do go “inworld” to write.

As I’ve said before, Second Life offers a great NaNo writing community, spread over several locations where writers hang out.  Some of the highlights of this year’s NaNo month in SL:

  • At least six Second Life groups have formed for the sole purpose of writers supporting each other during “WriMo.”
  • The fabulous Kghia Gherardi has hosted write-ins every Monday night at Bookstacks Pub.
  • Harriet Gausman’s Milk Wood writing center has had nearly daily events at their “Gypsy Camp”:  write-ins, “word wars,” and writing dashes to spur writers on to that 50K-word mark.
  • The Written Word group in SL has had at least weekly activities at their “camp” (see photo below) at the London School of Journalism Woodlands to bring writers together for “the quietest event on SL, apart from meditation,” as the group’s leader Jilly Kidd put it.

Just about every writers’ community, center, cafe, and pub in SL offers space to WriMos to come and write.

11-23-10_LSJ

If you haven’t started on those 50,000 words, it’s probably too late to try to get there before midnight December 1, but it’s not too late to log in and get the experience of a virtual write-in. And the best part is that the writers and supporting organizations go full-force all year round!

Are you NaNo-ing this year?  How are you doing and where do you get your best support and motivation? In Second Life?  On the NaNo website?  Another virtual world?  Or the so-called “real world”?  Post a comment and share!

It’s the virtual writing world squared: the mostly virtual National Novel Writing Month extravaganza, cialis 40mg
coupled with the totally virtual Second Life NaNoWriMo writers!

As NaNoWriMo winds down, case hundreds of thousands of words have risen counters at the NaNoWriMo website and at writers’ gatherings throughout SL (including the Milk Wood Gypsy Camp for writers, neurosurgeon
shown in the photo below).

11-23-10_gypsy-camp

I’m one of the slackers, unfortunately.  I’m not going to get even halfway to the 50,000 words written in November that entitles you to claim yourself a “winner” of the NaNoWriMo sprint. But that doesn’t matter, because I’ve been too busy this month sending agents queries, partials, and even a full manuscript of the novel I gave birth to in the 2008 NaNoWriMo.

Still, I’ve joined in several times on the NaNo “write-ins” at the lovely Milk Wood writing community in Second Life, and have spent time at my own writing area at Story Mountain Center for Writers, my home place in SL.  And even though I’ve written very few words of my next novel, I’ve loved the writers’ energy I tap into whenever I do go “inworld” to write.

As I’ve said before, Second Life offers a great NaNo writing community, spread over several locations where writers hang out.  Some of the highlights of this year’s NaNo month in SL:

  • At least six Second Life groups have formed for the sole purpose of writers supporting each other during “WriMo.”
  • The fabulous Kghia Gherardi has hosted write-ins every Monday night at Bookstacks Pub.
  • Harriet Gausman’s Milk Wood writing center has had nearly daily events at their “Gypsy Camp”:  write-ins, “word wars,” and writing dashes to spur writers on to that 50K-word mark.
  • The Written Word group in SL has had at least weekly activities at their “camp” (see photo below) at the London School of Journalism Woodlands to bring writers together for “the quietest event on SL, apart from meditation,” as the group’s leader Jilly Kidd put it.

Just about every writers’ community, center, cafe, and pub in SL offers space to WriMos to come and write.

11-23-10_LSJ

If you haven’t started on those 50,000 words, it’s probably too late to try to get there before midnight December 1, but it’s not too late to log in and get the experience of a virtual write-in. And the best part is that the writers and supporting organizations go full-force all year round!

Are you NaNo-ing this year?  How are you doing and where do you get your best support and motivation? In Second Life?  On the NaNo website?  Another virtual world?  Or the so-called “real world”?  Post a comment and share!

If you’re a writer of any kind or genre—fiction, tadalafil poetry, information pills journalism, creative nonfiction, etc.—you’ll be happy to hear about the many potential markets for your work in Second Life —way too many to list in a single article, in fact!

In this post, I focus on a periodical market that’s distinctively Second Life and the subject of my last post: magazines you can read like a book while in this 3D virtual world. In that post, I talked about how to read an inworld book.

THiNC printing process

Above, the THiNC headquarters in Second Life displays the two components involved in “printing” a book: a laid-out book and a printing press. Below, another popular printing press is the IntelliBook Factory. This press uses a similar process, but automates a few more of the steps.

Book Factory pressBut how do these books get “published”? Simple: inworld books and magazines (i.e., those manufactured like a book you read virtually) are “printed” on “printing presses” invented by the Gutenbergs of Second Life.

Strange, you may be thinking, given the mass, weight, and size of a first-life press. But not really! I grew up in a print shop (my parents published the local newspaper and did job printing at their shop). I played and worked amidst the letterpresses, Linotype machines, and later, offset presses. When I learned about the SL printing process, it actually reminded me a lot of the presses I grew up with (minus the ink-blackened hands, burnt fingers from hot type, and overpowering chemical smells, of course!)

Most inworld magazines and books I’ve seen in Second Life were printed on one of two presses: the THiNC Printing Press or the IntelliBook Factory. The steps for printing on the THiNC press are amazingly similar to the old letterpress operation. It’s only the method each step uses that’s so different:

Step: THiNC Printing Press: Letterpress:
Set the type and graphics using: computer software metal movable type
Lay out each page via: graphics software placing metal type into a wooden forme
Make a mock-up of the book by: dragging the electronic files into the 3D master book creating a papier mache mold of each page’s forme
Transfer the mock-up to the press by: “rezzing” the master book and placing it on the press clamping the papier mache mold onto the letterpress (one page at a time)
Activate the press and print by: right-clicking your mouse on the press pushing levers and buttons that move the big rollers (while standing clear of moving parts!!

So how “real” are these magazines? As real as the cold, hard cash they usually pay contributors! Here’s a quick look at the inworld magazines I’ve encountered in Second Life, most of which do pay their writers!

Literary Journals

Among my favorite are a couple of awesome literary journals:

AnonLiterary Magazine:

According to their call for submissions, AnonLiterary is a monthly publication that aims:

  • “To celebrate freedom of speech, freedom of anonymity, and the best writing from residents of Second Life
  • “To celebrate our freedom of anonymity in Second Life
  • “To celebrate the best fiction, poetry, essays and plays written by the residents of Second Life”

AnonLiterary Magazine“Material we are interested in publishing includes short fiction, poetry, essays, plays, commentary, experimental forms, and whatever you dream up that we like. Each month will also include a centerfold of the finest erotica SL writers have to offer.”

AnonLiterary also pays for published work. “We pay our writers L$500 a page at this time (we know, it isn’t much, we just want you to know that you are indeed highly valued!). We want new stuff that hasn’t been published before, with rights to publish in-world and online, exclusively for a month.”

sLiterary Magazine:

sLiterary MagazinesLiterary Magazine is another highly regarded literary journal, “a biannual magazine that publishes tasteful and highly selective fictional stories relating to the metaverse of Second Life.”

sLiterary is also paying market, advertising these rates: “For prose, expect payment from L$1 – L$10/word, depending on length and quality. Poetry, from L$100 and up.”

General Interest Magazines

Several other excellent magazines publish a variety of nonfiction articles on many facets of Second Life. Some also publish a small amount of fiction and poetry in each issue. The ones I’ve discovered include:

  • 1st Touch, a quarterly periodical that publishes freelance articles offering “inspiring, original work focused on touching our readers through their own experiences with our content.” To see a copy of 1st Touch, you’ll need to pick it up inworld. 1st Touch has a website, but the magazine is not available online (at least not yet).
  • The Best of SL, a monthly publication “which celebrates and honors those who have excelled in ANY field in Second Life.” Payment for writers is unknown, and their website is still in development. To view a copy of the magazine, you’ll need to go inworld.
  • 1st Touch Magazine The Best of SL Magazine
  • FreeLife Magazine, a twice-monthly general interest publication, is actively looking for “authors, journalists, photographers, and Second Life experts in News, Business, Fashion, Music and Entertainment to write for the magazine.” FreeLife’s website calls it “the new virtual magazine born in and for the most popular metaworld: Second Life. FreeLife is entirely edited by its inhabitants who tell juicy stories about what happens in their second life: news, events, protagonists and much more.” You can view back issues of FreeLife online.

Reveal Magazine

  • Reveal Magazine is a monthly publication of “Stories, News, and Opinions About the Virtual 3D World of Second Life.” Although no payment information is available, it’s a great outlet for publication credits, at least. “Stories, poems, photography, art, fashion, role-play, music, and events are a few of our subjects,” according to the magazine. Reveal Magazine provides an online version of each issue, as well as an inworld one.

Other Inworld Publications

Because Second Life”printing” allows for gorgeous, slick magazines, many of the inworld periodicals focus on style and design. Writers who are interested in freelance or staff writing jobs in Second Life should also take a look at these:

  • inV—the men’s guide to fashion, music, and living in Second Life, available in dispensers throughout Second Life
  • Second Style
  • Runway

The primary rule is the same in both the virtual and real world: Be sure you check submission guidelines and read an issue or two before submitting your work! Some magazines post guidelines on their websites; others in their publications.

Second Life is massive, so I’m assuming there are other inworld publications I know nothing about! Also, SL reflects first life: magazines appear and disappear from the scene on a fairly regular basis. So I’m asking you to let me know if you find other “inworld” magazines and journals, or if you learn any of the ones listed are no longer being published! Please post a comment with that information!

In upcoming posts, I’ll describe other types of SL writing markets, including website-based periodicals, contests, and book publication, so stayed tuned! And if you hear of one you want to know more about, let me know—post a comment here!

Joan Kremer is a professional business/nonfiction writer, recipe novelist, view short story writer, literary journal editor, blogger, and co-owner of the Story Mountain Center for Writers in Second Life®, where she goes by the avatar name Alas Zerbino (shown in picture below — writing on the grounds of Story Mountain!).

More about Alas Zerbino:

Alas Zerbino at Story Mountain Center for Writers in Second Life

  • Official blogger for TLE Educational Network, a vast, colorful, and amazing virtual university/interactive learning world based in Second Life
    –  TLE blog
    –  SLURL for teleporting to TLE Educational Network in Second Life

More about Joan Kremer:

  • Co-founder/editor of Cezanne’s Carrot, an online literary journal that publishes short fiction, creative nonfiction, and visual art that celebrates the universe and the human experience in uplifting, revolutionary ways

“The day is coming when a single carrot, freshly observed, will set off a revolution.” ~ Paul Cezanne

A few samples of my fiction writing online:

Short fiction published under my First Life name (Joan Kremer):

Poetry and fiction published under my Second Life name (Alas Zerbino):

And even more (than you probably ever wanted to know) about me:

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